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I have seen the other Questions on SO about the Recursive function and I have read the responses but I still can't get the algorithm to click in my head

var hanoi = function (disc, src, aux, dst) {

  if (disc > 0) {
    hanoi(disc - 1, src, dst, aux);
   document.write('Move disc ' + disc + ' from ' + src + ' to ' + dst);
    hanoi(disc - 1, aux, src, dst);
  }
}

hanoi(3, 'Src', 'Aux', 'Dst');

How does the document.write(...), ever run. My Logic is First time we run the function disc is > 3. then we recursively call the function again skipping everything below so how does the document.write get a chance to run?

I understand recursion (done the basic examples) but i still can't see how you get an output. If there is a way i can run it visually and see it in action, that would help alot.

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marked as duplicate by kapa Sep 4 '14 at 16:29

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1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can think of what will happen as a call tree (time moves from top to bottom):

hanoi(3, ...) =>
 |-> hanoi(2, ...) =>
 |    |-> hanoi(1, ...) =>
 |    |    |-> hanoi(0, ...) =>
 |    |    |    \-> (does nothing)
 |    |    |-> document.write(...)
 |    |    |-> hanoi(0, ...) =>
 |    |    |    \-> (does nothing)
 |    |  <-/ [hanoi(1, ...) finished]
 |    |-> document.write(...)
 |    |-> hanoi(1, ...) =>
 |    |    |-> hanoi(0, ...) =>
 |    |    |    \-> (does nothing)
 |    |    |-> document.write(...)
 |    |    |-> hanoi(0, ...) =>
 |    |    |    \-> (does nothing)
 |    |  <-/ [hanoi(1, ...) finished]
 |  <-/ [hanoi(2, ...) finished]
 |-> document.write(...) [halfway done!]
 |-> hanoi(2, ...) =>
 |    \-> [same pattern as the first time, with different data]
 \-> [hanoi(3, ...) finished]
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+1 I was about to write the same thing, but yours is more readable. The key, I think, is to think about each hanoi() not as a GOTO but rather as a subroutine of the previous hanoi(). In that sense, it does have disc go to 0, but it still has three hanois open, and they would continue to run. "Annie's going to leave after Bob leaves, who leaves after Cindy leaves, who leaves after Doug leaves" or some such. –  brymck Aug 15 '11 at 2:00

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