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I thought that &nbsp was necessary any time you wanted more than one space character to show up in html, but this site is showing me that multiple consecutive spaces are all being rendered... why is that?

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where on that site do you see that? –  DA. Aug 15 '11 at 2:56
    
@DA the 'table' at the bottom is just lined up with spaces –  Damon Aug 15 '11 at 3:01
    
The spaces occur between the dates of the plays and the titles. If you inspect elements you will see that there are just spaces in there, no  . –  Jason Gennaro Aug 15 '11 at 3:05
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you look closely at the source (before it is interpreted by a browser), you'll find that the website does in fact use   very heavily in the site:

Example (before the ONE FOR THE ROAD line)

<span style="line-height: 23px;"class="style_3">
    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
</span>

<span style="line-height: 23px; " class="style_1">
    ONE FOR THE ROAD
</span>

Try saving the page to your computer (with the browser's saving functionality, not copy-paste), and view the source in Notepad or a similar text editor, and you will see the &nbsp; entity everywhere.

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oh! In chrome in both the inspector and the 'view source' it doesn't show the &nbsp; s.. I assumed it would, and I guess that's why I was confused. I guess the question becomes where do you have to go to actually see the non-breaking spaces? –  Damon Aug 15 '11 at 3:07
    
Check out my post, I've updated it. Try saving the page and viewing it in notepad. As a general rule, if you see many spaces that aren't collapsing into one, the &nbsp; entity is being used. –  mopsled Aug 15 '11 at 3:10
    
odd.. I opened it in notepad and in notepad++ and I do not see any &nbsp; characters –  Damon Aug 15 '11 at 3:13
    
Try this: right-click on the page, Click Save As..., click save. Navigate to Production History.htm and open with Notepad++. Do a text search for &nbsp;. I can find hundreds of the things. –  mopsled Aug 15 '11 at 3:16
1  
@Damon - &nbsp; is just a entity reference for a character. When hand coding a page it's a convenient way of entering the non-breaking space character. But it is not the actual character. What the passionfool page is doing is sending the actual character, encoded as UTF-8, which when displayed in view source just looks like a normal space. When you do save as... the save process converts them to &nbsp; entity references so that they are convenient for use in a text editor. If a page sends the entity reference &nbsp;, that's what you'll see in 'view source' –  Alohci Aug 15 '11 at 9:06
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A much cleaner way is to use CSS white-space property.

Having the value set to pre or pre-wrap or pre-line will all display multiple spaces (line break handling will be different with each).

Here's a good post about that: http://www.impressivewebs.com/css-white-space/

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that makes sense and "In (X)HTML, anytime you string together a bunch of spaces in your code, the actual page output in your browser will, by default, trim (or collapse) all those spaces down to a single space." is how I'd always thought things worked.. but in that page there are a bunch of spaces together that are not collapsed, and I don't see a whitespace css property.. there is some javascript going on, though –  Damon Aug 15 '11 at 3:06
    
What I have seen is posts that talk about CSS and stuff, often post the output as images rather than actual code. That seems to be the case here too. I have seen this property work as I'm using it currently in my project. But why take my word, fiddle on your own! :) –  Mrchief Aug 15 '11 at 3:09
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A regular space () wraps to the next line. A non-breaking space &nbsp; prevents wrapping to the next line.

Assume the | | are sides of the div:

This is how a regular space will be rendered:

| |    
| |
| |
| |

A non-breaking space however will continue on the same line. In HTML, this will cause the element that the space is in to stretch beyond it's auto width.

|  |    
| |
| |
| |

This will in turn push out the entire width of that side:

|  |    
|  |
|  |
|  |

Multiple whitespace characters will render, however they do not perform the same way a non-breaking whitespace does.

Take a look at this jsFiddle, it will clear any confusion up.

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@Damon

&nbsp; is the entity used to represent a non-breaking space. It is essentially a space, the primary difference being that a browser should not break (or wrap) a line of text at the point that this entity occupies, it also prevents the collapsing of multiple consecutive whitespace characters into a single space, which is the current browsers standard behaviour.

When you look into the source of the site that you mention, you can see that the site in fact is using the &nbsp; entity to format the text:

<span class="style_3" style="line-height: 23px; ">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>
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