Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I could use some help on this one, given this code:

result1, result2, result3 = do_stuff {
  method_1
  method_2
  method_3
}

I would like to be able to write a method called do_stuff that can call each line of that block individually and return a result for each line/block. Can it be done? Am I going about this the wrong way? Something like this (doesn't work at all) is what I am thinking.

def do_stuff(&block)
  block.each_block do |block|
    block.call
  end
end

EDIT: What I am trying to accomplish is to be able to run each method/block call inside the method "do_stuff" in parallel (in it's own thread) and also add some logging around each method call.

share|improve this question
4  
Maybe you could tell us what you're really trying to accomplish. –  mu is too short Aug 15 '11 at 4:33
    
Indeed, because the short answer is "no" :-) –  Marc-André Lafortune Aug 15 '11 at 5:37
    
I want to be able to run each method/block call inside the method "do_stuff" in parallel (in it's own thread) and also add some logging around each method call. –  efleming Aug 15 '11 at 12:19

2 Answers 2

I agree with mu above, you should explain what you are trying to do, as there is probably a more suitable pattern to use.

BTW, you can do what you ask for with a minor change:

result1, result2 = do_stuff {
  [
    method_1,
    method_2,
    method_3
  ]
}

or, perhaps, more elegantly, without the block:

result1, result2 = [
  method_1,
  method_2,
  method_3
]

:)

share|improve this answer

OK, it looks clearer after the question was updated. You could do something like this, using method_missing, instance_eval and threads:

class Parallelizer
  class << self
    def run(receiver, &block)
      @receiver = receiver
      instance_eval &block
      # wait for all threads to finish
      @threads.each{|t| t.join}
      @results
    end

    def method_missing *args, &block
      @threads ||= []
      @results ||= []
      @threads.push Thread.new{
        # you could add here custom wrappings
        @results.push(@receiver.send(*args, &block))
      }
    end
  end
end

class Test
  def take_a_break name, sec
    puts "#{name} taking a break for #{sec} seconds"
    Kernel.sleep sec
    puts "#{name} done."
    name
  end
end

t = Test.new

results = Parallelizer.run(t) do
  take_a_break 'foo', 3
  take_a_break 'bar', 2
  take_a_break 'baz', 1
end

Be careful, though, that this is not well-tested and I am not sure how threadsafe.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.