Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following query:

set ANSI_NULLS ON
set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
go

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[Validate]
@a varchar(50),
@b varchar(50) output

AS

SET @Password = 
(SELECT Password
FROM dbo.tblUser
WHERE Login = @a)

RETURN @b
GO

This compiles perfectly fine.

In C#, I want to execute this query and get the return value.

My code is as below:

  SqlConnection SqlConn = new SqlConnection(System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MyLocalSQLServer"].ConnectionString.ToString());
        System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand sqlcomm = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand("Validate", SqlConn);

        string returnValue = string.Empty;

        try
        {
            SqlConn.Open();
            sqlcomm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

            SqlParameter param = new SqlParameter("@a", SqlDbType.VarChar);
            param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
            param.Value = Username;
            sqlcomm.Parameters.Add(param);



            SqlParameter retval = sqlcomm.Parameters.Add("@b", SqlDbType.VarChar);
            retval.Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue;


            string retunvalue = (string)sqlcomm.Parameters["@b"].Value;

Note: Exception handling cut to keep the code short. Everytime I get to the last line, null is returned. What's the logic error with this code?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Please accept an answer or start a bounty –  Leandro Aug 30 '12 at 17:47
    
You have some pretty good answers here... –  Yatrix Dec 18 '12 at 15:22
add comment

6 Answers

Mehrdad makes some good points, but the main thing I noticed is that you never run the query...

SqlParameter retval = sqlcomm.Parameters.Add("@b", SqlDbType.VarChar);
retval.Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue;
sqlcomm.ExecuteNonQuery(); // MISSING
string retunvalue = (string)sqlcomm.Parameters["@b"].Value;
share|improve this answer
add comment
retval.Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;

ParameterDirection.ReturnValue should be used for the "return value" of the procedure, not output parameters. It gets the value returned by the SQL RETURN statement (with the parameter named @RETURN_VALUE).

Instead of RETURN @b you should SET @b = something

By the way, return value parameter is always int, not string.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You say your SQL compiles fine, but I get: Must declare the scalar variable "@Password".

Also you are trying to return a varchar (@b) from your stored procedure, but SQL Server stored procedures can only return integers.

When you run the procedure you are going to get the error:

'Conversion failed when converting the varchar value 'x' to data type int.'

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is building on joel and mehrdads answer so in addition really, your never binding the parameter of the retval to the sqlcommand, you need a

sqlcomm.Parameters.Add(retval);

and to make sure your running the command

sqlcomm.ExecuteNonQuery();

Also not really sure why you have 2 strings return value (returnValue and retunvalue)

share|improve this answer
add comment

This SP looks very strange. It does not modify what is passed to @b. And nowhere in the SP you assign anything to @b. And @Password is not defined, so this SP will not work at all.

I would guess you actually want to return @Password, or to have SET @b = (SELECT...)

Much simpler will be if you modify your SP to (note, no OUTPUT parameter):

set ANSI_NULLS ON set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON go

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[Validate] @a varchar(50)

AS

SELECT TOP 1 Password FROM dbo.tblUser WHERE Login = @a

Then, your code can use cmd.ExecuteScalar, and receive the result.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I was having tons of trouble with the return value, so I ended up just selecting stuff at the end.

The solution was just to select the result at the end and return the query result in your functinon.

In my case I was doing an exists check:

IF (EXISTS (SELECT RoleName FROM dbo.Roles WHERE @RoleName = RoleName)) 
	SELECT 1
ELSE
	SELECT 0

Then

using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString))
{
    SqlCommand cmd = cnn.CreateCommand();
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    cmd.CommandText = "RoleExists";
    return (int) cmd.ExecuteScalar()
}

You should be able to do the same thing with a string value instead of an int.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.