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I have the following query:

set ANSI_NULLS ON
set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
go

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[Validate]
@a varchar(50),
@b varchar(50) output

AS

SET @Password = 
(SELECT Password
FROM dbo.tblUser
WHERE Login = @a)

RETURN @b
GO

This compiles perfectly fine.

In C#, I want to execute this query and get the return value.

My code is as below:

  SqlConnection SqlConn = new SqlConnection(System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MyLocalSQLServer"].ConnectionString.ToString());
        System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand sqlcomm = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand("Validate", SqlConn);

        string returnValue = string.Empty;

        try
        {
            SqlConn.Open();
            sqlcomm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

            SqlParameter param = new SqlParameter("@a", SqlDbType.VarChar);
            param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
            param.Value = Username;
            sqlcomm.Parameters.Add(param);



            SqlParameter retval = sqlcomm.Parameters.Add("@b", SqlDbType.VarChar);
            retval.Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue;


            string retunvalue = (string)sqlcomm.Parameters["@b"].Value;

Note: Exception handling cut to keep the code short. Everytime I get to the last line, null is returned. What's the logic error with this code?

Thanks

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8 Answers 8

Mehrdad makes some good points, but the main thing I noticed is that you never run the query...

SqlParameter retval = sqlcomm.Parameters.Add("@b", SqlDbType.VarChar);
retval.Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue;
sqlcomm.ExecuteNonQuery(); // MISSING
string retunvalue = (string)sqlcomm.Parameters["@b"].Value;
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retval.Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;

ParameterDirection.ReturnValue should be used for the "return value" of the procedure, not output parameters. It gets the value returned by the SQL RETURN statement (with the parameter named @RETURN_VALUE).

Instead of RETURN @b you should SET @b = something

By the way, return value parameter is always int, not string.

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You say your SQL compiles fine, but I get: Must declare the scalar variable "@Password".

Also you are trying to return a varchar (@b) from your stored procedure, but SQL Server stored procedures can only return integers.

When you run the procedure you are going to get the error:

'Conversion failed when converting the varchar value 'x' to data type int.'

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This is building on Joel's and Mehrdad's answers: you're never binding the parameter of the retval to the sqlcommand. You need a

sqlcomm.Parameters.Add(retval);

and to make sure you're running the command

sqlcomm.ExecuteNonQuery();

I'm also not sure why you have 2 return value strings (returnValue and retunvalue).

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This SP looks very strange. It does not modify what is passed to @b. And nowhere in the SP you assign anything to @b. And @Password is not defined, so this SP will not work at all.

I would guess you actually want to return @Password, or to have SET @b = (SELECT...)

Much simpler will be if you modify your SP to (note, no OUTPUT parameter):

set ANSI_NULLS ON set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON go

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[Validate] @a varchar(50)

AS

SELECT TOP 1 Password FROM dbo.tblUser WHERE Login = @a

Then, your code can use cmd.ExecuteScalar, and receive the result.

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I was having tons of trouble with the return value, so I ended up just selecting stuff at the end.

The solution was just to select the result at the end and return the query result in your functinon.

In my case I was doing an exists check:

IF (EXISTS (SELECT RoleName FROM dbo.Roles WHERE @RoleName = RoleName)) 
	SELECT 1
ELSE
	SELECT 0

Then

using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString))
{
    SqlCommand cmd = cnn.CreateCommand();
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    cmd.CommandText = "RoleExists";
    return (int) cmd.ExecuteScalar()
}

You should be able to do the same thing with a string value instead of an int.

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You have mixed up the concept of the Return Value and Output variable. 1- Output Variable:

Database----->:
create proc MySP
@a varchar(50),
@b varchar(50) output
AS
SET @Password = 
(SELECT Password
FROM dbo.tblUser
WHERE Login = @a)

C# ----->:

SqlConn.Open();
sqlcomm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

SqlParameter param = new SqlParameter("@a", SqlDbType.VarChar);
param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;//This is optional because Input is the default

param.Value = Username;
sqlcomm.Parameters.Add(param);

SqlParameter outputval = sqlcomm.Parameters.Add("@b", SqlDbType.VarChar);
outputval .Direction = ParameterDirection.Output//NOT ReturnValue;


string outputvalue = sqlcomm.Parameters["@b"].Value.ToString();
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Suppose you need to pass Username and Password to Stored Procedure and know whether login is successful or not and check if any error has occurred in Stored Procedure.

public bool IsLoginSuccess(string userName, string password)
{
    try
    {
        SqlConnection SQLCon = new SqlConnection(WebConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["SqlConnector"].ConnectionString);
        SqlCommand sqlcomm = new SqlCommand();
        SQLCon.Open();
        sqlcomm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        sqlcomm.CommandText = "spLoginCheck"; // Stored Procedure name
        sqlcomm.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Username", userName); // Input parameters
        sqlcomm.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Password", password); // Input parameters

        // Your output parameter in Stored Procedure           
        var returnParam1 = new SqlParameter
        {
            ParameterName = "@LoginStatus",
            Direction = ParameterDirection.Output,
            Size = 1                    
        };
        sqlcomm.Parameters.Add(returnParam1);

        // Your output parameter in Stored Procedure  
        var returnParam2 = new SqlParameter
        {
            ParameterName = "@Error",
            Direction = ParameterDirection.Output,
            Size = 1000                    
        };

        sqlcomm.Parameters.Add(returnParam2);

        sqlcomm.ExecuteNonQuery(); 
        string error = (string)sqlcomm.Parameters["@Error"].Value;
        string retunvalue = (string)sqlcomm.Parameters["@LoginStatus"].Value;                    
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {

    }
    return false;
}

Your connection string in Web.Config

<connectionStrings>
    <add name="SqlConnector"
         connectionString="data source=.\SQLEXPRESS;Integrated Security=SSPI;Initial Catalog=Databasename;User id=yourusername;Password=yourpassword"
         providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
  </connectionStrings>

And here is the Stored Procedure for reference

CREATE PROCEDURE spLoginCheck
    @Username Varchar(100),
    @Password Varchar(100) ,
    @LoginStatus char(1) = null output,
    @Error Varchar(1000) output 
AS
BEGIN

    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    BEGIN TRY
        BEGIN

            SET @Error = 'None'
            SET @LoginStatus = ''

            IF EXISTS(SELECT TOP 1 * FROM EMP_MASTER WHERE EMPNAME=@Username AND EMPPASSWORD=@Password)
            BEGIN
                SET @LoginStatus='Y'
            END

            ELSE
            BEGIN
                SET @LoginStatus='N'
            END

        END
    END TRY

    BEGIN CATCH
        BEGIN           
            SET @Error = ERROR_MESSAGE()
        END
    END CATCH
END
GO
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