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What determines whether an Oracle object (table, view, etc.) is required to be qualified with a schema name (for example, schema.table_name, or schema.view_name, etc.)? At times I am able to access a remote objects (via a DB link) without having to qualify the schema, but other times, I receive an error stating that the "table or view doesn't exist", and to correct this, I must qualify the schema name.

I am aware that it is a best practice to always qualify a schema name, but I am just curious why I am able to access certain remote objects without a qualified schema, and others only with a qualified schema.

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As you point out, it's best practice to qualify with a schema name. Note that if you don't, and someone gets deep database access, they could hijack your work. For example, what if they changed the synonym so that DBMS_UTILITY pointed to MyBadSchema.DBMS_UTILITY instead of SYS.DBMS_UTILITY. You wouldn't know, and they could easily capture your calls or do other problematic things. So qualify. –  Jim Hudson Aug 15 '11 at 13:33
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2 Answers

It depends on what username have you used when you logged in. Or what username was used when the database link was created/configured.

See, for each schema, there is a user. If you logged in as a user "XYZ", then you do not need to qualify object within the "XYZ" schema.

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From the Oracle documentation: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B14117_01/server.101/b10759/sql_elements009.htm

The following example illustrates how Oracle resolves references to objects within SQL statements. Consider this statement that adds a row of data to a table identified by the name departments:

INSERT INTO departments 
VALUES 
(
 280, 
 'ENTERTAINMENT_CLERK', 
 206, 
 1700);

Based on the context of the statement, Oracle determines that departments can be:

  • A table in your own schema
  • A view in your own schema
  • A private synonym for a table or view
  • A public synonym

Oracle always attempts to resolve an object reference within the namespaces in your own schema before considering namespaces outside your schema. In this example, Oracle attempts to resolve the name departments as follows:

  1. First, Oracle attempts to locate the object in the namespace in your own schema containing tables, views, and private synonyms. If the object is a private synonym, then Oracle locates the object for which the synonym stands. This object could be in your own schema, another schema, or on another database. The object could also be another synonym, in which case Oracle locates the object for which this synonym stands.

  2. If the object is in the namespace, then Oracle attempts to perform the statement on the object. In this example, Oracle attempts to add the row of data to departments. If the object is not of the correct type for the statement, then Oracle returns an error. In this example, departments must be a table, view, or a private synonym resolving to a table or view. If departments is a sequence, then Oracle returns an error.

  3. If the object is not in any namespace searched in thus far, then Oracle searches the namespace containing public synonyms. If the object is in that namespace, then Oracle attempts to perform the statement on it. If the object is not of the correct type for the statement, then Oracle returns an error. In this example, if departments is a public synonym for a sequence, then Oracle returns an error.

What it's saying is that Oracle will check locally for objects you call before expanding its search outwards. It may well be that there are public (or your own private) synonyms on some of your remote objects allowing you to reference them directly whereas those without the synonyms you'll have to fully qualify.

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I would say "your current schema" rather than "your own schema". If you log in as TOM do an ALTER SESSION SET current_schema = BOB, for example, Oracle will look for tables and views in the BOB schema, not the TOM schema. –  Justin Cave Aug 15 '11 at 14:01
    
@Justin Cave, I totally agree, that part of the text is Oracle's own documentation verbatim. You'd have thought they might specify it slightly better wouldn't you. –  Ollie Aug 15 '11 at 14:24
    
Agreed. Still, it's worth correcting the oversight here. –  Justin Cave Aug 15 '11 at 14:48
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