Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Once I pass a variable inside a function as a reference, if I later access it, is it still a reference or..?

Example:

function one(){
    $variables = array('zee', 'bee', 'kee');
    $useLater =& $variables;
    two($variables);
}

function two($reference){
    foreach($reference as $variable){
        echo 'reference or variable, that is the question...';
    }
}

In function two(); are the variables here a reference to previously set $variables or a new element is created (in memory, I guess..)?

Plus, one more, is there a way to check if variable is passed by reference or not? (like: is_reference();)

share|improve this question
1  
Whatever the answer is: Pass by reference at call time is deprecated. –  Felix Kling Aug 15 '11 at 12:42
    
@Felix, what is the replacement for "pass by reference" now? –  jolt Aug 15 '11 at 12:44
    
You can test this pretty easily, OP. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 15 '11 at 12:44
    
@Tom: Read the documentation. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 15 '11 at 12:45
1  
@Tom: See yes123's answer. –  Felix Kling Aug 15 '11 at 12:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A variable is only passed by reference (in current versions of PHP), if you explicitly pass it by reference using &$foo.

Equally, when declaring a variable to a new variable, such as $foo = $bar, $foo will be a reference to $bar until the value changes. Then it is a new copy.

There are lots of ways of detecting a reference here, maybe check some of them out. (Why you would need to do this is unknown, but still, it is there).

http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.references.spot.php

share|improve this answer

As defined above the function two will use a new copy of $refernce.

To use the original variable you need to define function two like this:

function two(&$ref) {
  //> Do operation on $ref;
}
share|improve this answer

variable. look:

function one(){
    $variables = array('zee', 'bee', 'kee');
    $useLater =& $variables;
    two($variables);
    var_dump($variables);
}

function two($reference){
    $reference = array();
}

gives

array(3) { [0]=> string(3) "zee" [1]=> string(3) "bee" [2]=> string(3) "kee" }

so changing it in two() diesn't change it in one(), so it's variable.

share|improve this answer

The variable sent to two() is a new element. If you want to access a reference of the variable, use two(&$variable);

In answer to your second query, there is no standard function to test if a variable is a reference, however, the link below should give you some pointers in check if a variable is a reference or not.

PHP: check if object/array is a reference

share|improve this answer

If you want the parameter for the function to be a reference, you have to write an & there, too.

Only exception should be objects.

share|improve this answer

Just try it out for yourself:

<?php

$variables = array('zee', 'bee', 'kee');
one($variables);

foreach($variables as $variable2){
        echo "original: ".$variable2."<br>";
    }


function one(&$variables){

    $useLater =& $variables;
    two($variables);

    foreach($variables as $variable2){
        echo "function one: ".$variable2."<br>";
    }

}

function two(&$reference){
    foreach($reference as $variable){
        echo "function two: ".$variable."<br>";
    }
    $reference[0] = 'lee';
}

?>

Now leave out the &-sign and see what happens. You will need to tell PHP explicitly everytime how you intend to pass on the variable in question.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.