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The following type extension

module Dict =

  open System.Collections.Generic

  type Dictionary<'K, 'V> with
    member this.Difference(that:Dictionary<'K, 'T>) =
      let dict = Dictionary()
      for KeyValue(k, v) in this do
        if not (that.ContainsKey(k)) then
          dict.Add(k, v)
      dict

gives the error:

The signature and implementation are not compatible because the declaration of the type parameter 'TKey' requires a constraint of the form 'TKey : equality

But when I add the constraint it gives the error:

The declared type parameters for this type extension do not match the declared type parameters on the original type 'Dictionary<,>'

This is especially mysterious because the following type extension doesn't have the constraint and works.

type Dictionary<'K, 'V> with
  member this.TryGet(key) =
    match this.TryGetValue(key) with
    | true, v -> Some v
    | _ -> None

Now I'm having weird thoughts: is the constraint required only when certain members are accessed?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
module Dict =

  open System.Collections.Generic

  type Dictionary<'K, 'V> with
    member this.Difference(that:Dictionary<'K, 'T>) =
        let dict = Dictionary(this.Comparer)
        for KeyValue(k, v) in this do
            if not (that.ContainsKey(k)) then
                dict.Add(k, v)
        dict

EDIT:

As per F# spec (14.11 Additional Constraints on CLI Methods)

Some specific CLI methods and types are treated specially by F#, because they are common in F# programming and cause extremely difficult-to-find bugs. For each use of the following constructs, the F# compiler imposes additional ad hoc constraints:

  • x.Equals(yobj) requires type ty : equality for the static type of x
  • x.GetHashCode() requires type ty : equality for the static type of x
  • new Dictionary<A,B>() requires A : equality, for any overload that does not take an IEqualityComparer<T>
share|improve this answer
1  
I would never have arrived at that. Why does initializing the dictionary with the comparer circumvent the equality constraint? –  Daniel Aug 15 '11 at 17:12
    
Thanks, desco. I need to stay up for some late-night spec reading. –  Daniel Aug 15 '11 at 17:20
    
@Daniel, I suspect that reading specs late at night would probably have the opposite effect than staying up - for me anyway ;) –  Benjol Aug 15 '11 at 20:25

as far as I can see the following code does the trick:

module Dict =
open System.Collections.Generic

type Dictionary<'K, 'V> with
    member this.Difference(that: Dictionary<'K,'V2>) = 
        let diff =
            this
            |> Seq.filter (fun x -> not <| that.ContainsKey(x.Key))
            |> Seq.map (fun x -> x.Key, x.Value)
        System.Linq.Enumerable.ToDictionary(diff, fst, snd)
share|improve this answer

The problem is your use of the Add method. If you use this method of Dictionary<TKey, TValue> then F# will enforce that TKey has the equality constraint.

After playing around a bit I'm not sure that it's even possible to write this extension method. The F# type system appears to force the declaration type of the extension method to have no additional constraints than the original type (i get an error whenever I add the equality constraint). Additionally the type listed in the individal extension methods cannot differ than the listed type. I've tried a number of ways and can't get this to function correctly.

The closest I've come is the non-extension method as follows

let Difference (this : Dictionary<'K, 'T>) (that:Dictionary<'K, 'T> when 'K : equality) =
    let dict = Dictionary()
    for KeyValue(k, v) in this do
        if not (that.ContainsKey(k)) then
            dict.Add(k, v)
    dict

Perhaps another F# ninja will be able to prove me wrong

share|improve this answer
    
Yikes...my weird thoughts are confirmed. I've tried it several ways and it's not looking possible to me either. –  Daniel Aug 15 '11 at 14:48

(EDIT: CKoenig has a nice answer.)

Hm, I didn't immediately see a way to do this either.

Here's a non-type-safe solution that might provide some crazy inspiration for others.

open System.Collections.Generic  

module Dict =  
  type Dictionary<'K, 'V> with    
    member this.Difference<'K2, 'T when 'K2 : equality>(that:Dictionary<'K2, 'T>) =      
        let dict = Dictionary<'K2,'V>()      
        for KeyValue(k, v) in this do        
            if not (that.ContainsKey(k |> box |> unbox)) then          
                dict.Add(k |> box |> unbox, v)      
        dict

open Dict

let d1 = Dictionary()
d1.Add(1, "foo")
d1.Add(2, "bar")

let d2 = Dictionary()
d2.Add(1, "cheese")

let show (d:Dictionary<_,_>) =
    for (KeyValue(k,v)) in d do
        printfn "%A: %A" k v

d1.Difference(d2) |> show

let d3 = Dictionary()
d3.Add(1, 42)

d1.Difference(d3) |> show

let d4 = Dictionary()
d4.Add("uh-oh", 42)

d1.Difference(d4) |> show  // blows up at runtime

Overall it seems like there may be no way to unify the types K and K2 without also forcing them to have the same equality constraint though...

(EDIT: seems like calling into .NET which is equality-constraint-agnostic is a good way to create a dictionary in the absence of the extra constraint.)

share|improve this answer
    
Where is the constraint coming from? Is it tied to the use of Add, like Jared pointed out? Is there some other way to know when such constraints are required, other than the compiler telling you? –  Daniel Aug 15 '11 at 16:57
    
    
apparently new Dictionary adds the constraint, which explains why ToDictionary is ok. –  Brian Aug 15 '11 at 17:27

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