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I am using <error-page> element in web.xml to specify the friendly error page when user encounters a certain error such as error with code of 404:

<error-page>
        <error-code>404</error-code>
        <location>/Error404.html</location>
</error-page>

However, I want that if the user does not meet any error code specified in <error-page>, he or she should see a default error page. How can I do that using the element in the web.xml?

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2  
What servletcontainer are you using/targeting and what servlet version is your web.xml declared to? There's only since Servlet 3.0 an easy way. –  BalusC Aug 15 '11 at 14:44
    
I am using Tomcat 6, servlet 2.5 –  ipkiss Aug 15 '11 at 14:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 122 down vote accepted

On Servlet 3.0 or newer you could just specify

<error-page>
    <location>/general-error.html</location>
</error-page>

But as you're still on Servlet 2.5, there's no other way than specifying every common HTTP error individually. You need to figure which HTTP errors the enduser could possibly face. On a barebones webapp with for example the usage of HTTP authentication, having a disabled directory listing, using custom servlets and code which can possibly throw unhandled exceptions or does not have all methods implemented, then you'd like to set it for HTTP errors 401, 403, 500 and 503 respectively.

<error-page>
    <!-- Missing login -->
    <error-code>401</error-code>
    <location>/general-error.html</location>
</error-page>
<error-page>
    <!-- Forbidden directory listing -->
    <error-code>403</error-code>
    <location>/general-error.html</location>
</error-page>
<error-page>
    <!-- Missing resource -->
    <error-code>404</error-code>
    <location>/Error404.html</location>
</error-page>
<error-page>
    <!-- Uncaught exception -->
    <error-code>500</error-code>
    <location>/general-error.html</location>
</error-page>
<error-page>
    <!-- Unsupported servlet method -->
    <error-code>503</error-code>
    <location>/general-error.html</location>
</error-page>

That should cover the most common ones.

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Can you specify a general error page and then override certain error codes with the <error-code> tag? –  Qix Jan 2 '13 at 12:39
5  
@Qix: error page matches are searched in the same order as they're declared in web.xml. So just put the global last. –  BalusC Jan 2 '13 at 12:42
    
@BalcusC nice tip about Servlet 3.0, thanks. But where exactly is that stated in spec? Couldn't find that. –  Tomas R Mar 21 '13 at 7:48
6  
@Tomas: Tomcat guys had the same problem as you. This is nowhere literally mentioned in spec, only figure 14-10 in the spec and the web.xml XSD file proves that <error-code> and <exception-type> became optional instead of required. See issue 52135. –  BalusC Mar 21 '13 at 10:42
    
java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-app_2_5.xsd specifies no <description> child for the <error-page> element, so pasting the above code as-is in a Servlet 2.5 web.xml will cause XSD validation errors. If I comment them, though, it works fine, thanks! –  László van den Hoek Jul 23 '13 at 13:42

You can also do something like that:

<error-page>
    <error-code>403</error-code>
    <location>/403.html</location>
</error-page>

<error-page>
    <location>/error.html</location>
</error-page>

For error code 403 it will return the page 403.html, and for any other error code it will return the page error.html.

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