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Given such a command in bash:

echo -e "a b "{1..3}" d e\n"
a b 1 d e
 a b 2 d e
 a b 3 d e

the output of line 2... starts with a blank. Why is that? Where does it come from? How can I avoid it?

I do know how to get rid of it with sed or something else, but I would prefer to avoid it in the first place.

I've only mentioned it, together with {..}-Syntax. Are there other, similar cases, without it?

update:

A useful workaround is, to remove the first letter with backspace:

echo -e "\ba b "{1..3}" d e\n"

or, as Jared Ng suggests:

echo -e "\ra b "{1..3}" d e\n"

update 2:

We get rid of leading newlines with:

echo -e "\na b "{1..4}" d e" | sed '1d'
echo -e "\na b "{1..4}" d e" | tail -n +2

or trailing:

echo -e "\ba b "{1..3}" d e\n" | sed '$d'
echo -e "\ba b "{1..3}" d e\n" | head -n 3
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Does sh have this problem as well? –  Kit Ho Aug 15 '11 at 17:02
3  
printf gives you better control over your output: printf "%s\n" "a b "{1..3}" d e" –  glenn jackman Aug 15 '11 at 17:13
    
Does sh have {a..n} at all? –  user unknown Aug 15 '11 at 17:17
    
No, I don't think sh does curly brace expansion. –  Jared Ng Aug 15 '11 at 18:14
    
Another workaround: eval "echo 'a b "{1..3}" d e';" –  Pumbaa80 Aug 15 '11 at 18:39
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted
echo -e "\ra b "{1..3}" d e\n"

Fixes it for me. Output:

a b 1 d e
a b 2 d e
a b 3 d e

(\r is the carriage return -- it brings the caret back to the beginning of the line, preventing the space)

Why does bash do this? Run echo "abc"{1..3}. You'll see that bash outputs: abc1 abc2 abc3. Notice the spaces in between? {1..3} expands the expression, delimited by spaces. When you use a newline, as in echo "abc"{1..3}"\n", bash keeps those spaces and simply adds a newline as requested. Those are what show up in the output.

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why caret doesn't start at the beginning? –  Kit Ho Aug 15 '11 at 16:50
    
This does indeed work, but what a wierd solution to a wierd problem. It seems to be part of the way \n is interpretted - if you move it to the beginning of the line you get a random space on the end of the output lines... –  DaveRandom Aug 15 '11 at 16:56
3  
Here, this might illustrate why bash has this oddity. Run echo "abc"{1..3}. You'll see that bash outputs: abc1 abc2 abc3. Notice the spaces in between? When you use a newline `echo "abc"{1..3}"\n", bash keeps those spaces and simply adds a newline as requested. Those are what show up in the output. –  Jared Ng Aug 15 '11 at 16:59
    
Included in answer now, thanks :) –  Jared Ng Aug 15 '11 at 17:36
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The {...} expands to a sequence of space-delimited alternatives, so you have in effect

echo "a b "1" d e\n" "a b "2" d e\n" "a b "3" d e\n"

The spaces after \n are the spaces you're seeing in the output.

You can try to move \n to the beginning of your string, like in

echo -e "\na b "{1..3}" d e"

Update

Another method (untested, sorry)

 printf "%s\n" "a b "{1..3}" d e"
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@nm: that isn't very good since there will be an extra line at the beginning of the output –  Kit Ho Aug 15 '11 at 17:01
    
@Kit Ho: now you have one extra newline at the end (probably avoidable with some extra flags to echo). –  n.m. Aug 15 '11 at 17:16
    
The other solutions have the problem at the last line, and deleting the first line is as easy as deleting the last one, isn't it? –  user unknown Aug 15 '11 at 17:25
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Brace expansion was designed to generate a list of entries to be used as arguments to commands. The generated entries are always space-delimited, hence the extra spaces.

To use the {1..3} syntax as is, you'll need to use a command that can treat each generated entry as an independent arg (echo simply prints them out as it sees it). A good option here is printf (as suggested by @glenn in the comments above).

[me@home]$ printf "%s\n" "a b "{1..3}" d e"
a b 1 d e
a b 2 d e
a b 3 d e
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