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To try to display graphics using C, I am trying to take advantage of C's "inline assembly" feature. I get no errors during compilation, but when I try to run the program, I get this error:

Segmentation Fault: 11

Here is my code:

int main(){
asm("movb 0xc,%ah");
asm("movb $1,%al");
asm("movw $5,%cx");
asm("movw $5,%dx");
asm("int $0xc");
return 0;
}

Constructive criticism appreciated, insults not. Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Well, which line causes the seg-fault? – Oliver Charlesworth Aug 15 '11 at 17:13
2  
which operating system? – Vlad Aug 15 '11 at 17:14
    
1) You should combine the statements into a single asm("...\n\t....") 2) More importantly: I know of no OS under which this will work (That is even assuming you meant int $0x10). – user786653 Aug 15 '11 at 17:16
    
@OilCharlesworth I have no idea. – smilinggoomba Aug 15 '11 at 17:17
2  
I hope you are on DOS, as everything else would not support software interrupts to access graphics hardware... – Yann Ramin Aug 15 '11 at 17:17

First, it looks like you're trying to use BIOS interrupts to do the graphics, but the graphics interrupt is int 10h (0x10), not 0xc, so you want to call int $0x10.

Second, you can't call most BIOS interrupts from within 32-bit or 64-bit Linux or Windows programs, so make sure you're compiling this for DOS. Otherwise, calling the invoke interrupt opcode on a BIOS interrupt will crash your program. And if you run a newer version of Windows, you'll probably still have to run your compiled program inside of an emulator like DOSBox for it to work properly.

Finally, GCC inline assembly has a certain format to it:

   __asm__ __volatile__ ( 
         assembler template 
       : output operands                  /* optional */
       : input operands                   /* optional */
       : list of clobbered registers      /* optional */
       );

So for example:

int main()
{
  /* Set video mode: */
  __asm__ __volatile__ (
    "movb $0x0, %%ah \n\
     movb $0x13, %%al \n\
     int $0x10"
    :
    :
    :"ax"
  );

  /* Draw pixel of color 1 at 5,5: */
  __asm__ __volatile__ (
    "movb $0xC,%%ah \n\
     movb $1, %%al \n\
     movw $5, %%cx \n\
     movw $5, %%dx \n\
     int $0x10"
   :
   :
   :"ax","cx","dx"
  );

  /* Reset video mode: */
  __asm__ __volatile__ (
    "movb $0x0, %%ah \n\
     movb $0x03, %%al \n\
     int $0x10"
    :
    :
    :"ax"
  );

  return 0;
}

But the optional fields are only really useful if you're writing functions in assembly language and want to pass in arguments from your C code.

Also, I don't have DJGPP and a DOS installation handy, so I can't test any of this code to make sure it works with the 32-bit protected mode binaries it generates, but hopefully I've hit the nail close enough on the head that you can handle the rest yourself. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Hi James, your code of draw the pixel is very useful to me right now, do you know how's the code for getting the pixel color? – Simon Oroño Dec 21 '14 at 14:47
    
At such a low level, pixel formats and offset calculations will be defined by the video mode used. VGA Mode 13h (from my example) is an indexed color mode, so you'll have to actually copy the pixel data from video memory and compare the values to the color palette entries to get the actual color data. You can read more about VGA graphics programming here: brackeen.com/vga – James O'Doherty Dec 22 '14 at 18:22

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