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This seems to be a common question on here but for all the ones I read, they seem to deal with different things.

I'm writing a program with a main class that manages an array of objects of a different class, and I'm having difficulty calling a print() method from this second class, from within the main class.

The Main class attempts to call print(), which is in the Unit class. The Unit class looks something like this:

public class Unit{

    static int numOfUnits = 0;
    public Unit[] units = new Unit[8];

    private int unitID;

//constructors are here

    public void print(){
    for (int i = 0; i < units.length; i++)
    System.out.print(units[i].unitID);
    }

    public void add(Unit unit){
    mobs[numbofUnits] = unit;
    numOfUnits++;
    }
}

So what I'd like to happen is, through the Main class, I add new Unit objects to the units array. When I'm done adding them (using the call unitToAdd.add(unitToAdd) in the Main class) I would like to call Unit's print() method from within Main.

What I don't know is, whether or not, and where, to use the static modifier, how to refer to the variables in the print() method itself (that is, do I use this.unitID, units[i].unitID, etc) and so on.

What is confusing me is simply the nature of the print() method. I have setters and getters that work just fine since I completely understand that calling specificUnit.setID() is changing a specific variable for that specific object, but I don't know how to get methods like print() to work.

Thanks!

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1  
can you please post the code from your Main class – Paul Bellora Aug 15 '11 at 17:47
3  
do you really want Unit to have an array of Units? seems like you could be confused on how to group things into classes. – Nathan Hughes Aug 15 '11 at 17:50

Simple answer - you need a Unit instance to invoke print(). I strongly recommend that you go back to the basics - Learning the Java Language.

share|improve this answer
1  
agreed - there is some major design confusion on the whole here – Paul Bellora Aug 15 '11 at 17:52

You should probably avoid implementing a list of Units in Unit. You can avoid static state altogether by creating a UnitList class to store your list of units, maybe in an ArrayList, and then creating a UnitList instance that is local to your main method.

public static void main(String[] argv) {
  UnitList myUnitList = new UnitList();
  myUnitList.add(new Unit(...));
  myUnitList.print();
}

That separates out the concern of tracking a set of units from the units themselves and avoids global mutable state which is hard to debug and unit test.

To answer your question though, below is the minimal set of changes with some explanation as to why they should be static or not.

public class Unit{

  // static here since every unit does not need to have a number of units.
  static int numOfUnits = 0;
  // static here since every unit does not need to contain other units.
  static Unit[] units = new Unit[8];

  // no static here since every unit does need its own ID.
  private int unitID;

  //constructors are here

  // static here since every unit does not need to know how 
  // to print a particular 8 units.
  public static void print(){
    for (int i = 0; i < numOfUnits; i++)
      System.out.print(units[i].unitID);
  }

  // static here since every unit does not need to know how
  // to add to a global list.
  public static void add(Unit unit){
    mobs[numbofUnits] = unit;
    numOfUnits++;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Consider what will happen if you want to have more than one Units. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 15 '11 at 17:51
    
@Thorbjørn, I addressed that in an edit. – Mike Samuel Aug 15 '11 at 17:53
    
The "list" is still shared by all instances of Units. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 15 '11 at 18:07
    
@Thorbjørn, how so? If the list is stored in a UnitList instance, then it is entirely separable from Unit and involves no mutable static state. – Mike Samuel Aug 15 '11 at 18:09
    
in your revised source. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 15 '11 at 18:27

Here's what I'd do:

  • Remove the units array and numOfUnits from Unit.

  • Give Unit a toString method that lists its unit ID, like:

    public String toString() {
        return "" + unitID;
    }
    
  • Have the program store its units in an ArrayList. Use System.out.println(yourArrayList.toString()) to print it out. Use yourArrayList.add(aUnit); to add things to it.

  • Remove the add and print methods from Unit because you don't need them.

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