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I want to be able to declare an abstract function in an parent class, with an unknown number of arguments:

abstract function doStuff(...);

and then define an implementation with a set of hinted arguments:

 /**
 * @param int $userID
 * @param int $serviceproviderID
 */
static function doStuff($userID, $serviceproviderID) {}

The best approach I've got so far is this,

abstract function doStuff();

 /**
 * @param int $userID
 * @param int $serviceproviderID
 */
static function doStuff() {
    $args = func_get_args();
    ...
}

But every time the function is called, I get a bunch of 'missing argument' warnings because of the hints. Is there a better way?

Edit: The question's wrong, please don't waste your time answering. The following is what I was looking for, and it seems to work without warnings.

abstract class Parent {
    abstract function doStuff();
}

/**
* @param type $arg1
* @param type $arg2
*/
class Child extends Parent {
    function doStuff($arg1, $arg2) {
        ...
    }
}
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Have you considered taking your arguments in the form of array? –  w0bni Aug 15 '11 at 18:17
2  
Why would you define a function as abstract in an interface? Then again, an interface function must have the same declaration as its implementation. That's the whole idea of interfaces. I don't know what your goal is, but I think you must be trying to make your code as unclear and unusable as possible. –  GolezTrol Aug 15 '11 at 18:21
    
Huh, sorry, I may have screwed this question up. I'm not getting any warnings, so I guess this approach is OK. I specifically want multiple, named arguments as it makes the code more readable. –  user668660 Aug 15 '11 at 18:21
    
When you really want to provide an abstract method with an unknown number of arguments, you probably didn't really thought about it. You usually define abstracts methods, so everyone can extends the class and everyone else can use any implementation without knowing their concrete details, but with an unknown number of arguments the users must know the details. –  KingCrunch Aug 15 '11 at 18:22
    
@GolezTrol - No, I miss-spoke. It's an abstract method in a parent class. –  user668660 Aug 15 '11 at 18:23

1 Answer 1

According the comment

I specifically want multiple, named arguments as it makes the code more readable.

abstract public function foo ($a, $b=null, $c=null);

If you want to pass an arbitrary number of values, use arrays

abstract public function foo ($args);

You should avoid "unknown number of arguments", because it makes things more difficult, then necessary: method signatures in interfaces as well as abstract methods should give the user a hint, how the method will work with any implementation. Its an important part, that the user shouldn't need to know anything about the implementation details. But when the number of arguments changes with every implementation, he must know, how the concrete methods are implemented.

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Well, you must avoid having an unknown number of arguments in PHP because the language doesn't allow for it. But as a general coding technique it's perfectly acceptable in certain cases. –  J.Steve Mar 13 '13 at 4:27
2  
@J.Steve I don't know, if I get your point, but PHP allows it ^^ codepad.viper-7.com/UW1ghx –  KingCrunch Mar 13 '13 at 8:34
    
I think the point is the only way you can deal with an "unknown" number of arguments is by stating that you expect exactly one argument (so that PHP knows it expects one argument)...it just happens that one argument can have any number of properties and values within it. Not technically true to say PHP allows for an unknown number of arguments. –  niaccurshi Feb 24 at 20:37

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