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I'm creating a DOM element (a div), adding it to the DOM, then changing its width all in one quick hit in javascript. This in theory should trigger a CSS3 transition, but the result is straight from A to B, without the transition in between.

If I make the width change through a separate test click event everything works as expected.

Here's my JS and CSS:

JS (jQuery):

var div = $('<div />').addClass('trans').css('width', '20px');
$('#container').append(div);
div.css('width', '200px');

CSS (just mozilla for the minute):

.trans {
    -moz-transition-property: all;
    -moz-transition-duration: 5s;
    height: 20px;
    background-color: cyan;
}

Am I messing up here, or is the "all in one quick hit" not the way things should be done?

All help is really appreciated.

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I'm confused - do you want to animate the height or the width? or both? Also, is using jquery's .animate() method out of the question? Because if it's not, that's the way I'd recommend to do it. Let me know, and I'll write you up a simple way to do it with jQuery (or fix the CSS). –  Connor Aug 15 '11 at 19:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Instead of using setTimeout as MikeM suggests, you may also just read the css property before setting it:

var div = $('<div />').addClass('trans');
$('#container').append(div);
div.css('width');//add this line
div.css('width', '200px');

Working here:

http://jsfiddle.net/FYPpt/144/

Anyone knows why these hacks are necessary?

Edit: My follow-up question is answered in the comment by Lucero

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8  
+1 - Depending on the existing values (such as "none"), the browser needs to first process the new layout to recognize the change that triggers the transition (e.g. numeric to numeric). Reading a CSS property forces the layout to be computed. –  Lucero Jan 7 at 15:39
    
Saved me some time of research, exactly what I needed. Such a fool requirement... –  BernaMariano Mar 17 at 21:07
    
God, the hack works like a charm! –  Isilmë O. Jun 10 at 13:06

here are two ways to do this.

1 - CSS transitions

by using setTimeout the addClass method will run after instead of along with the preceding script so that the transition event will fire

example jsfiddle

jQuery:

var div = $('<div class="trans" />');
$('#container').append(div);
// set the class change to run 1ms after adding the div
setTimeout(function() {div.addClass('wide')}, 1); 

CSS:

.trans {
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    background-color: cyan;
    -webkit-transition: all 5s ease;
       -moz-transition: all 5s ease;
        -ie-transition: all 5s ease;
         -o-transition: all 5s ease;
            transition: all 5s ease;
}
.wide {
    width: 200px;
}

2 - jQuery's .animate() function

example jsfiddle

jQuery:

var div = $('<div class="trans" />');
$('#container').append(div);
div.animate({'width': '200px'}, 5000); // 5 sec animation

CSS:

.trans {
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    background-color: cyan;
}
share|improve this answer

jsfiddle is really helpful for testing. Are you looking for something like this?

http://jsfiddle.net/ShaggyDude11/A8atU/

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