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I'm now working in a small optimisation of a basic dot product function, by using SSE instructions in visual studio.

Here is my code : (function call convention is cdecl) :

float SSEDP4(const vect & vec1, const vect & vec2)
{
    __asm
    {
        // get addresses
        mov ecx, dword ptr[vec1]
        mov edx, dword ptr[vec2]
        // get the first vector
        movups xmm1, xmmword ptr[ecx]
        // get the second vector (must use movups, because data is not assured to be aligned to 16 bytes => TODO align data)
        movups xmm1, xmmword ptr[edx]
        // OP by OP multiply with second vector (by address)
        mulps xmm1, xmm2
        // add everything with horizontal add func (SSE3)
        haddps xmm1, xmm1
        // is one addition enough ?
        // try to extract, we'll see
        pextrd eax, xmm1, 03h
    }
}

vect is a simple struct that contains 4 single precision floats, non aligned to 16 bytes (that is why I use movups and not movaps)

vec1 is initialized with (1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.0) and vec2 with (2.0, 1.8, 1.6, 1.0)

Everything compiles well, but at execution, I got 0 in both XMM registers, and so as result while debugging, visual studio shows me 2 registers (MMX1 and MMX2, or sometimes MMX2 and MMX3) which are 64 bits registers, but no XMM and everything to 0.

Does someone has an idea of what's happening ?

Thank you in advance :)

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Note that Visual Studio is not the compiler; Visual C++ is the actual compiler; Visual Studio is the IDE. (I have therefore edited the question) –  Billy ONeal Aug 15 '11 at 19:32
1  
Debug + Windows + Registers. Right-click the window and tick SSE2 –  Hans Passant Aug 15 '11 at 19:47
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2 Answers 2

There are a couple of ways to get at SSE instructions on MSVC++:

  1. Compiler Intrinsics -> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t467de55.aspx
  2. External MASM file.

Inline assembly (as in your example code) is no longer a reasonable option because it will not compile when building for non 32 bit, x86, systems. (E.g. building a 64 bit binary will fail)

Moreover, assembly blocks inhibit most optimizations. This is bad for you because even simple things like inlining won't happen for your function. Intrinsics work in a manner that does not defeat optimizers.

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2  
I would echo Billy's comments above and strongly recommend that you use intrinsics wherever possible. Note that Win8 will be available on ARM chips so if you want your code to be able to run on ARM with a simple recompile, then avoid assembly wherever you can. –  Rich Turner Aug 15 '11 at 19:40
    
Hi, thank you for your quick answer ! I still have a small question : is it possible to use MASM files directly in functions ? Or do they define a function to call from the code ? –  Grégoire Aug 15 '11 at 19:48
    
@Gregoire You define the function in the assembly file and call it from code. Of course you would need to declare the function before calling it. –  Billy ONeal Aug 15 '11 at 20:14
    
@Richard intrinsics are definitely not guaranteed to work across different CPUs. –  Jasper Bekkers Aug 16 '11 at 8:26
    
@Jasper: Well, SSE as a whole doesn't work across different CPUs. That's not a rip on the intrinsics, that's a rip on SSE period. You'll at least be able to do things like build for x64 using the intrinsics. Won't help you much for ARM of course, unless MSVC++ emulates them with the serial version of the same. (Don't know; can't really test because no public version of MSVC++ can build for ARM) –  Billy ONeal Aug 16 '11 at 8:28
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You compiled and ran correctly, so you are at least able to use SSE.

In order to view SSE registers in the Registers window, right click on the Registers window and select SSE. That should let you see the XMM registers.

You can also use @xmm<register><component> (e.g., @xmm00 to view xmm0[0]) in the watch window to look at individual components of the XMM registers.

Now, as for your actual problem, you are overwriting xmm1 with [edx] instead of stuffing that into xmm2.

Also, scalar floating point values are returned on the x87 stack in st(0). Instead of trying to remember how to do that, I simply store the result in a stack variable and let the compiler do it for me:

float SSEDP4(const vect & vec1, const vect & vec2)
{
    float result;
    __asm
    {
        // get addresses
        mov ecx, dword ptr[vec1]
        mov edx, dword ptr[vec2]
        // get the first vector
        movups xmm1, xmmword ptr[ecx]
        // get the second vector (must use movups, because data is not assured to be aligned to 16 bytes => TODO align data)
        movups xmm2, xmmword ptr[edx] // xmm2, not xmm1
        // OP by OP multiply with second vector (by address)
        mulps xmm1, xmm2
        // add everything with horizontal add func (SSE3)
        haddps xmm1, xmm1
        // is one addition enough ?
        // try to extract, we'll see
        pextrd [result], xmm1, 03h
    }

    return result;
}
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This works better now ! I also managed to save one instruction by aligning data to 16 bytes (using __declspec(align 16) ), and then by melting the second movups and the mulps together (mulps can use addresses only in aligned mode). By doing some test however (in debug mode, with no compiler optimizations), I discovered that running 100 000 000 times a dot product is faster using basic instructions than using SSE instruction set. Does anyone knows what happened there ? –  Grégoire Aug 21 '11 at 8:08
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