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I have an auto generated class file whit many partial classes (auto generated from an xsd schema). I use VS2010 and VB.NET. I want to create objects of all of the partial classes like this

Dim schema_obj As Schema
schema_obj = New Schema
schema_obj.Info = New Info
schema_obj.Info.Number = New Number
schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3

For all the properties in the different classes (like ex.

schema_obj.Info.Number.Value
schema_obj.Info.Birthday.Value
schema_obj.Info.Colour

I have to write

schema_obj.Info.Number = New Number
schema_obj.Info.Birthday = New Birtday
schema_obj.Info.Colourr = New Colour

I have one function that creates all of these objects and this way I fill the schema object with data.

What is the best way to organize my code? And what about dependency injection? Where should I put my function? In the business layer?

Thanks in advance

UPDATE:

Thanks for all comments and your complementary answer! I appreciate it very much! I’m developing a part of and business application. The application is used for registration of persons data, invoicing, accounting, and so on. The part I’m developing is a reporting system to the authority via wcf services. In my part I will use VB.NET but the other parts of the system are developed in VB6. We use an SQL server and nearly all the business logic is located at the server side. Because I’m used to use VB6 its difficult to grasp all the OOP things I need to remember to write the code as it should be. In my part of the application I get an xsd schema from the authority and auto generate my schema class file from the xsd file with xsd.exe. I see that it’s a much better solution that you suggest, but when I looked at my auto generated class file after reading your answer I see that every partial class has a MyBase = New line in the constructor. I can use this in a way, like you suggest? Sorry for not understanding this earlier! If I understand the behavior of MyBase correct, I can write

Dim Number = New Number
Number.value = 3

and the Number constructor will call the Info constructor an the Info constructor will call the Schema constructor. And I can write

Dim PersonName = New PersonName
PersonName.Value = Bob

Dim PersonAdress = New PersonAdress
PersonAdress.Value = New York

Instead of

schema_obj.Info.Person.PersonName = New PersonName
schema_obj.Info.Person.PersonName.value = Bob

But still I have to create many objects in my function. How can I do this in a better way?

And in the end of my function I want to parse the schema object to a memory stream. I do that like this: Dim memorystream As New System.IO.MemoryStream Dim ser As New XmlSerializer(GetType(Schema))

ser.Serialize(memorystream, Schema_obj)

But now I do not have a Schema_obj that holds the information, how can I parse the scehema_obj (all the information) to a memorystream?

UPDATE 2

Sorry, now I understand (I think) and I have done as you said and I can write

Schema_obj = New Schema
Schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3
Schema_obj.Info.Person.PersonName = New PersonName
Schema_obj.Info.Person.PersonName.value = Bob

And I do not have to create the objects in my function. But instead of adding my own constructors the MyBase takes care of the job? And now I also can serialize my schema_obj.

But is it possible for you to say anything more about how I can solve the problem with Schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3 The project I doing is a fest step against vb.net and OOP for my business. I can use entity framework for my data layer, and I can have my business logic in a Business layer. My front end will be in vb6.

UPDATE 3

Now I’m back to being a little bit confused. I thought I got it but I do not… when I try to run my application I get the error: Object reference not set to an instance of an object. It seems like I have to write

Dim schema_obj As Schema
schema_obj = New Schema
schema_obj.Info = New Info
schema_obj.Info.Number = New Number
schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3

The MyBase did not do what I thought it did? Can you please explain some more? Thank you!

UPDATE 4

Thanks for your reply.

  1. Take an XML Schema and have VB.NET classes generated from it.
  2. Build objects and fill in some data (property values).
  3. Serialise everything back to XML.

This is exactly what I do. But I thought I had to convert the xsd to a class, build objects and fill the objects with data and then serialize it back to xml. Why is it a better solution to go for what you suggest? I’m new to this so I appreciate your answers. Do you have an example of when it it a good solution to convert the xsd to objects, like I have done? The xsd I use will change once a year, is it easier to adapt my code to the changes in the way you suggest? The xsd schema is more complex than I showed in my example, I do not know if that have anything to say regarding what method I have to choose?

UPDATE 5:

I’m developing an application where I use wcf services . I use the web service the organization offer to:

1.Send an xml schema populated with data 2.Get a list of available web services 3.Get a specific xsd schema

What I have to do is:

1.Get a xsd schema form the authority and use this xsd to generate a xml populated with data 2.Call the webservice where I can specify a number for a specific xsd schema , and get the xsd schema in return. Then I can validat my xml schema against it before I send it to the authority

3.Use a web service where my xml string is in a string property of a method of the wcf service and I send the xml file to the authority

My xsd looks (almost) like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?>
<xs:schema attributeFormDefault="unqualified" elementFormDefault="qualified" xmlns:br="http://www.br.se/or" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <!--title='Tittle' lang='E'-->
  <xs:element name="Schema">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="LEDE">
          <p>Some text</p>
        </br:txt>
      </xs:documentation>
      <xs:documentation>


…………………………


<xs:complexType>
      <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="Information"/>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="Payer"/>
      </xs:sequence>
      <xs:attribute fixed="105" name="numberr" type="xs:integer" use="required"/>
      <xs:attribute fixed="10360" name="externalnumberr" type="xs:integer" use="required"/>
            <xs:attribute fixed="Title" name="title" type="xs:string" use="optional"/>
      <xs:attribute fixed="4895" name="groupid" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="optional"/>
      <xs:attribute name="id" use="optional">
        <xs:simpleType>
          <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
            <xs:enumeration value="761065">
              <xs:annotation>
                <xs:documentation>Text</xs:documentation>
              </xs:annotation>
            </xs:enumeration>
          </xs:restriction>
        </xs:simpleType>
      </xs:attribute>
      <xs:anyAttribute/>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
<xs:element name="Info">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="LEDE">
          <p>Some Text</p>
        </br:txt>
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element ref="Task">
          <xs:annotation>
            <xs:documentation>
              <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="LEDE">
                <p>Some text</p>
              </br:txt>
            </xs:documentation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element ref="Year">
          <xs:annotation>
            <xs:documentation>
              <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="LEDE">
                <p>Some Text</p>
              </br:txt>
            </xs:documentation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="Taskowner"/>
      </xs:sequence>
      <xs:attribute fixed="4877" name="id" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
<xs:element name="TaskSpesialTask">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:info br:type="some txt">1</br:info>
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="List1">
          <xs:attribute fixed="212" name="schemaid" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
  <xs:simpleType name="List2">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:info br:type="id">2</br:info>
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
      <xs:length value="1"/>
      <xs:enumeration value="1">
        <xs:annotation>
          <xs:documentation>
            <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="LEDE">
              <p>Some text</p>
            </br:txt>
          </xs:documentation>
        </xs:annotation>
      </xs:enumeration>
      <xs:enumeration value="2">
        <xs:annotation>
          <xs:documentation>
            <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="LEDE">
              <p>Some text</p>
            </br:txt>
          </xs:documentation>
        </xs:annotation>
      </xs:enumeration>
    </xs:restriction>
  </xs:simpleType>
<xs:element name="Year">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:info br:type="pl">2</br:info>
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="Format">
          <xs:attribute fixed="692" name="schemaid" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
  <xs:simpleType name="Format">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:info br:type="id">6</br:info>
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:restriction base="xs:gYear"/>
  </xs:simpleType>
<xs:element name="TaskOwner">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="LEDE">
          <p>Some Text</p>
        </br:txt>
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element ref="TaskoOwnerNumber">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="TaskOwnerName">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="TaskOwnerAdress
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="TaskOwnerPhone">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="TaskOwnerEmail">
          <xs:annotation>  
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
      </xs:sequence>
      <xs:attribute fixed="48" name="id" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
<xs:element name="TaskOwnerNumber">
    <xs:annotation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="TextFormat">
          <xs:attribute fixed="21" name="id" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
  <xs:simpleType name="TextFormat">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:info br:type="id">1</br:info>
      </xs:documentation>
      <xs:documentation>
        <br:txt br:lang="E" br:txttype="F">
          <p>Wrong number</p>
        </brreg:tekst>
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
      <xs:length value="9"/>
    </xs:restriction>
  </xs:simpleType>
  <xs:element name="TaskOwner name">
    <xs:annotation> 
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="TextFormat">
          <xs:attribute fixed="2" name="id" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
  <xs:element name="TaskOwner Adress">
    <xs:annotation>
    </xs:annotation>
  </xs:element>

And so on for phone and email

 <xs:element name="Payers">
    <xs:annotation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element maxOccurs="20000" minOccurs="0" ref="PayersInfo"/>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PaymentTotal">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="NumberOfPayers">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
      </xs:sequence>
      <xs:attribute fixed="410" name="id" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
  <xs:element name="PayersInfo">
    <xs:annotation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerBirthNumber">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerNumber">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerBirthDay">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerName">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerAdress">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerPhone">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerEmail">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
        <xs:element minOccurs="0" ref="PayerSum">
          <xs:annotation>
          </xs:annotation>
        </xs:element>
      </xs:sequence>
      <xs:attribute fixed="48" name="id" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
  <xs:element name="PayerBirthNumber">
    <xs:annotation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="TextFormat">
          <xs:attribute fixed="2305" name="id" type="xs:positiveInteger" use="required"/>
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
  <xs:simpleType name="TextFormat">
    <xs:annotation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
      <xs:length value="11"/>
    </xs:restriction>
  </xs:simpleType>


And som on for PayerNumber, PayerBirthDay, PAYerNAMe, PayerAdress, PayerPhone, PayerEmail…..

</xs:schema>

The elements in the xsd are structured as this:

Schema 
  Info
   Year
   TaskOwner
    TaskOwnerName
    TaskOwnerAdress
    TaskOwnerPhone
    TaskOwnerEmail
    TaskOwnerNumber
 Task
    TaskSpecialTask
    TaskOrdinaryTask
    Payers
        PaymentTotal
        NumberOfPayers
        PayersInfo (list of payers)
          PayerBirtNumber
          PayerBirthDay
          PayerName
          PayerAdress
          PayerPhone
          PayerEmail

(Pleas ignore if something is left out in the xsd - it is there just so I can explain my problem better)

My question is, how should I generate the xml based on the xsd? I want to do this for multiple xsd schemas. Isn't it the a good solution to deserialize the xsd (with xsd.exe) to a class, create object of that class and populate it with data, and then serialize the object back to xml? Or is it still better the way you suggest. I really want to learn and do it the best way, and not do it the easiest way for me.. I hope this makes it easyer for you to give me an answer.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Basically, your question as it is is far too broad to get reasonable answers. I don't think anyone can advise you on a) the "business layer" question, based solely on the three code snippets shown; we would need more "higher-level" information, e.g.: 1. What kind of application are you creating? 2. What kind of structure does your solution currently have? 3. Have you already decided on any known architecture style? Have you already defined any tiers or layers? etc. b) It's also not clear which "function" you speak of, so how can we advise you on where to put it? –  stakx Aug 15 '11 at 20:16
    
Sorry, but now you're asking so very many questions that it's become almost impossible to formulate a reasonable answer. :-( I'm going to post one more answer with an alternative approach; I'll suggest that in the future, you ask only about one single thing at a time. –  stakx Aug 16 '11 at 12:37
    
"Why is it a better solution to go for what you suggest?" It might be the better solution if it turns out to make your code a lot simpler and solve your problem much quicker than your current approach. -- "The xsd I use will change once a year, is it easier to adapt my code to the changes in the way you suggest?" Yes, because you can use the XSD to validate the inline XML literal, ie. you will quickly see what needs to be changed in your VB.NET code because if the schema changes, the XML literal might cause warnings or even errors at compile time until you've fixed your code around it. –  stakx Aug 16 '11 at 20:27
    
I have updatet my question with a lot mor info about my xsd. Thanks a lot for all your time! –  Liss Aug 18 '11 at 7:41

2 Answers 2

If I may say so, organising your solution should not be your most immediate concern, because it appears that your code suffers from a much more important issue right now, which might result in many hard-to-find bugs; namely this:

schema_obj = New Schema
schema_obj.Info = New Info
schema_obj.Info.Number = New Number
schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3

You mentioned Dependency Injection, so I will write a little bit about something in that general direction.

Dependency Injection is very useful because it builds "object graphs" for you. That is, if an object has references to other objects which it requires for proper functioning, these other objects are essentially "dependencies". (As you can see, your Schema objects each have a Info "dependency", and your Info objects each have a Number "dependency".) DI containers (such as Autofac, Unity, NInject, StructureMap, or Castle) can automatically initialise references to dependencies for you.

Now contrast this again to your own code:

schema_obj = New Schema
schema_obj.Info = New Info
schema_obj.Info.Number = New Number
schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3

Sidenote: This type of code — that is, accessing a property by traversing a chain of objects — is usually referred to as "train wreck" coding. I encourage you to google for the "Law of Demeter" (LoD), a.k.a. the "Principle of Least Knowledge", to learn why this is bad practice.

Basically, you're manually initialising a Schema object's (schema_obj's) dependencies "from the outside". If you have to do this each time that you need a Schema object instance, it's easy to forget something, resulting in an incomplete dependency object graph, and thus in bugs (e.g. NullReferenceExceptions).

Moving initialization code to your classes' constructors

The first step to correct this would be to let Schema do this work itself. Now, the generator declared the generated classes Partial for a good reason, namely that you can easily add your own code to them. I'm assuming that Schema, Info, and Number are such auto-generated classes. So you could add your own additional initialization code for these classes:

Public Partial Class Schema
    Public Sub New()
        Me.Info = New Info()
    End Sub
End Class

Public Partial Class Info
    Public Sub New()
        Me.Number = New Number()
    End Sub
End Class

Which means you can now change your above code to:

schema_obj = New Schema()  ' this will trigger the above constructors
schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3

(The second line is still not good, but I would have to know your program and domain model better to give advice on how to improve that; I'm leaving that out of here for now.)

Why is this code better? Because your Schema object will now make sure itself that it is properly initialized. Now, unlike before, the "user" of the Schema class no longer has to know how a Schema object must be constructed so that it will work properly. That "knowledge" about Schema's internal functioning has been moved into the Schema class itself, where it really belongs; the Schema "user" no longer has to worry how a Schema object has to look like on the inside.

(It's exactly for this reason that the second line: schema_obj.Info.Number.Value = 3 is still evil. This line of code makes a lot of assumptions about the internal structure of your objects. It should probably look more like schema_obj.SetNumber(3).)

Towards Dependency Injection

If you wanted to use a DI container, one method of making your code ready for it would be to change your constructors as follows:

Public Partial Class Schema
    Public Sub New(ByVal info As Info)
        Me.Info = info
    End Sub
End Class

Public Partial Class Info
    Public Sub New(ByVal number As Number)
        Me.Number = number
    End Sub
End Class

At first glance, this seems to contradict what I wrote above: Your constructors now declare that they "need" an Info object, or a Number object respectively.

However, with dependency injection — more specifically, a technique called "constructor injection" — you won't actually have to call these constructors yourself; the DI container will do that for you:

schema_obj = dependencyInjectionContainer.Resolve(Of Schema)()

The DI container's Resolve method will then automatically "inject" the dependencies which have been specified as parameters to your constructors into the constructors. This requires, however, that you have previously made all relevant types known to the DI container by "registering" them.

That's just to give you an idea of where you might be heading. You probably won't need DI for now, but I strongly advise you to at least add your own constructors to your auto-generated classes as shown.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated my question, and I would very much appreciate it if you could help me a little bit further. Thank you! –  Liss Aug 16 '11 at 10:41

Based on the recent updates to your question, you seem to be doing the following:

  1. Take an XML Schema and have VB.NET classes generated from it.
  2. Build objects and fill in some data (property values).
  3. Serialise everything back to XML.

If that is it, I do wonder if this is the right approach, or if you'd not be better off keeping everything in the form of an in-memory XML document; e.g.:

Imports System.Xml
Imports <xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
…

Dim personName = "Bob"
Dim personAddress = "New York"

Dim xmlDocument = 
    <Schema xsi:noSchemaNamespaceLocation="./relativePathTo/yourSchema.xsd">
        <Info>
            <Number>3</Number>
            <Person>
                <PersonName><%= personName %></PersonName>
                <PersonAddress><%= personAddress %></PersonAddress>
            </Person>
        </Info>
    </Schema>

This way, it's easy to build a complete XML document, and it should be really easy to serialise to a file.

  • You can import namespaces with an Imports directive.
  • You can have "placeholders" <%=a VB.NET expression=>in your XML tree.
  • You can have your inline XML validated by your schema file.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I have updatet my question again if you have the time to take a look?! I will try to improve my questions, and just ask on question, but it is hard when I have so many questions. Sorry for that! –  Liss Aug 16 '11 at 13:21

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