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I know that I can easily get positioned parameters like this in bash:

$0 or $1

I want to be able to use flag options like this to specify for what each parameter is used:

mysql -u user -h host

What is the best way to get -u param value and -h param value by flag instead of by position?

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1  
It might be a good idea to ask/check over at unix.stackexchange.com as well –  MRR0GERS Aug 15 '11 at 19:30
4  
google for "bash getopts" -- lots of tutorials. –  glenn jackman Aug 15 '11 at 19:33
22  
@glenn-jackman: I will definately google it now that I know the name. The thing about google is - to ask a question - you should already know 50% of the answer. –  Stann Aug 15 '11 at 19:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 101 down vote accepted

This is the idiom I usually use:

while test $# -gt 0; do
        case "$1" in
                -h|--help)
                        echo "$package - attempt to capture frames"
                        echo " "
                        echo "$package [options] application [arguments]"
                        echo " "
                        echo "options:"
                        echo "-h, --help                show brief help"
                        echo "-a, --action=ACTION       specify an action to use"
                        echo "-o, --output-dir=DIR      specify a directory to store output in"
                        exit 0
                        ;;
                -a)
                        shift
                        if test $# -gt 0; then
                                export PROCESS=$1
                        else
                                echo "no process specified"
                                exit 1
                        fi
                        shift
                        ;;
                --action*)
                        export PROCESS=`echo $1 | sed -e 's/^[^=]*=//g'`
                        shift
                        ;;
                -o)
                        shift
                        if test $# -gt 0; then
                                export OUTPUT=$1
                        else
                                echo "no output dir specified"
                                exit 1
                        fi
                        shift
                        ;;
                --output-dir*)
                        export OUTPUT=`echo $1 | sed -e 's/^[^=]*=//g'`
                        shift
                        ;;
                *)
                        break
                        ;;
        esac
done

Key points are:

  • $# is the number of arguments
  • while loop looks at all of the arguments supplied, matching on their values inside a case statement
  • shift takes the first one away. You can shift multiple times inside of a case statement to take multiple values.
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1  
What does the --action* and --output-dir* cases do? –  Lucio Jul 23 '14 at 0:22
1  
They just save the values they get into the environment. –  Flexo Jul 23 '14 at 5:27
    
I guess @Lucio meant what is the * for... –  arod Jul 27 at 17:46

This example uses Bash's built-in getopts command and is from the Google Shell Style Guide:

verbose='false'
aflag=''
bflag=''
files=''

while getopts 'abf:v' flag; do
  case "${flag}" in
    a) aflag='true' ;;
    b) bflag='true' ;;
    f) files="${OPTARG}" ;;
    v) verbose='true' ;;
    *) error "Unexpected option ${flag}" ;;
  esac
done

Example usage: ./script -v -a -b -f filename

Using getopts has several advantages over the accepted answer:

  • the while condition is a lot more readable and shows what the accepted options are
  • cleaner code; no counting the number of parameters and shifting
  • you can join options (e.g. -a -b -c-abc)

However, a big disadvantage is that it doesn't support long options, only single-character options.

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getopt is your friend.. a simple example:

function f () {
TEMP=`getopt --long -o "u:h:" "$@"`
eval set -- "$TEMP"
while true ; do
    case "$1" in
        -u )
            user=$2
            shift 2
        ;;
        -h )
            host=$2
            shift 2
        ;;
        *)
            break
        ;;
    esac 
done;

echo "user = $user, host = $host"
}

f -u myself -h some_host

There should be various examples in your /usr/bin directory.

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A more extensive example can be found in the directory /usr/share/doc/util-linux/examples, at the very least on Ubuntu machines. –  Serge Stroobandt Jan 22 at 22:36

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