Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to convert an Integer 35634646 to have the thousand "," so it should be 35,634,646.

What would be the quickest way to doing that?

share|improve this question
1  
Thanks for the question. I always have a problem with that –  Val Sep 12 '12 at 15:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 92 down vote accepted
System.out.println(NumberFormat.getNumberInstance(Locale.US).format(35634646));
Output: 35,634,646
share|improve this answer
    
I had to add import java.text.NumberFormat;. –  Mike Slutsky May 11 at 21:09

You ask for quickest, but perhaps you mean "best" or "correct" or "typical"?

You also as for commas to indicate thousands, but perhaps you mean "in normal human readable form according to the local custom of your user"?

You do it as so:

    int i = 35634646;
    String s = NumberFormat.getIntegerInstance().format(i);

Americans will get "35,634,646"

Germans will get "35.634.64"

Swiss Germans will get "35'634'646"

share|improve this answer
int bigNumber = 1234567;
String formattedNumber = String.format("%,d", bigNumber);
share|improve this answer
    
Note: This implements the locale-specific grouping. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Formatter.html#dnum –  adam.r Jan 28 '14 at 21:08
 int value = 35634646;
 DecimalFormat myFormatter = new DecimalFormat("#,###");
 String output = myFormatter.format(value);
 System.out.println(output);

OUTPUT: 35,634,646

share|improve this answer
1  
Your pattern need not be more than #,###, if you want european style formatting then you can use #,##,###. –  Ali Aug 15 '11 at 20:25
    
@Ali! Thanks. I did not know that. Updated. –  Bala R Aug 15 '11 at 20:28
5  
@Ali: The format you describe is only used in India, and I'm at least 90% sure India isn't in Europe. –  Cairnarvon Jun 2 '13 at 7:34
    
I get it... fine, if you need indian formatting then that's how you do it. –  Ali Jun 14 '13 at 3:42

The other answers are correct, however double-check your locale before using "%,d":

Locale.setDefault(Locale.US);
int bigNumber = 35634646;
String formattedNumber = String.format("%,d", bigNumber);
System.out.println(formattedNumber);

Locale.setDefault(new Locale("pl", "PL"));
formattedNumber = String.format("%,d", bigNumber);
System.out.println(formattedNumber);

Result:

35,634,646
35 634 646
share|improve this answer

First you need to include the JSTL tags :-

<%@ taglib prefix="c" uri="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/core" %>
<%@ taglib prefix="fmt" uri="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/fmt" %> 

at the start of the page

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.