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Following the steps detailed in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zt39148a.aspx#Y684, I have created a Windows service which I have successfully installed and tested. But I am puzzled by something in the components used to install the service.

Installation of the service is accomplished by a designer-generated ProjectInstaller class, shown below. This class is used by installutil.exe (in .NET Framework) to install the service and its associated service process. The designer-generated code creates two installer objects: MyServiceInstaller for the service, and MyServiceProcessInstaller for the service process, to be used by installutil.exe at installation time. However, it inserts only the latter into the Installers collection.

So how does the service itself get installed? Is there a "default service" for the service process, if no services are explicitly installed along with the service process?

CODE:

(If you experiment with this, you will find that the Designer actually creates this class using two partial-classes. I have consolidated these into a single class for simplicity.)

namespace MyService
{
    [RunInstaller(true)]
    public class ProjectInstaller : System.Configuration.Install.Installer
    {
        public ProjectInstaller()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify
         /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.MyServiceProcessInstaller = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceProcessInstaller();
            this.MyServiceInstaller = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceInstaller();
            // 
            // MyServiceProcessInstaller
            // 
            this.MyServiceProcessInstaller.Account = System.ServiceProcess.ServiceAccount.LocalSystem;
            this.MyServiceProcessInstaller.Password = null;
            this.MyServiceProcessInstaller.Username = null;
            // 
            // MyServiceInstaller
            // 
            this.MyServiceInstaller.ServiceName = "MyService";
            // 
            // ProjectInstaller
            // 
            this.Installers.AddRange(new System.Configuration.Install.Installer[] {
            // *** Expected here:  this.MyServiceInstaller,
            this.MyServiceProcessInstaller});
        }

        private System.ServiceProcess.ServiceProcessInstaller MyServiceProcessInstaller;
        private System.ServiceProcess.ServiceInstaller MyServiceInstaller;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I vaguely recall reading that one of these is used by installutil and the other is used if you build a Windows Installer. I could be wrong, though. –  Joe White Aug 15 '11 at 20:39
    
@Joe - Thanks, I'll have a look at that as a possiblity. –  Joel Lee Aug 15 '11 at 20:52
    
Does this explain? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Jacob Seleznev Aug 15 '11 at 22:52
    
@Jacob - Thanks. Unfortunately, the article leaves me even more puzzled because it says (see Remarks section): "set the installation properties for the service using the ServiceProcessInstaller and ServiceInstaller instances, and add the instances to the Installers collection." This is exactly what I would expect. However, the designer-generated code adds only the ServiceProcessInstaller to the Installers collection. Hence my question. –  Joel Lee Aug 16 '11 at 6:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The ServiceInstaller does need to be added to the collection of Installers. I followed the same steps described in the article and it came out correctly:

private void InitializeComponent()
{
   this.serviceProcessInstaller1 = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceProcessInstaller();
   this.serviceInstaller1 = new System.ServiceProcess.ServiceInstaller();
   // 
   // serviceProcessInstaller1
   // 
   this.serviceProcessInstaller1.Password = null;
   this.serviceProcessInstaller1.Username = null;
   // 
   // serviceInstaller1
   // 
   this.serviceInstaller1.ServiceName = "Service1";
   // 
   // ProjectInstaller
   // 
   this.Installers.AddRange(new System.Configuration.Install.Installer[] {
      this.serviceProcessInstaller1,
      this.serviceInstaller1});

}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for slow reply. Very busy. As an exercise, I repeated the prescribed steps for creating a service, and got the expected result (i.e. same as yours). However, I know that when I did this originally, I definitely only got an installer for the service process, not the service itself, and I did not hack on the designer-generated code. I then installed it, and the service ran just fine. So I think there are cases where the designer behaves as I described in my question, but it isn't worth spending any any more time on it at this point. Thanks for looking into this. –  Joel Lee Aug 19 '11 at 22:04

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