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Trying to use a query like this:

var checkName = from nn in xdoc.Root.Elements("string")
                        where nn.Attribute("id").Value.Equals(newTag)
                        select thisbool = true;

To see if, in my XML, there exists a node string where the value of attribute id equals this string variable newTag. If there does NOT exist such a string node, I would like to return null, or something that I can check using an if statement directly below so that I may disallow a particular change to be made, i.e.

 if (thisbool)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("The string ID you entered is already in use. Please enter a different string ID.");
            tagBox.Text = undoTag;
            return;
        }

This is my current setup. I also tried just selecting nn and using if(nn != null) but nothing seems to work. I'm sorry if this is a newb question -- I'm entering a bit of a time crunch, and I did indeed try to find an answer and test things out for 45min-1 hour.

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This query will just all the elements that match your condition:

var checkName = from nn in xdoc.Root.Elements("string")
                        where nn.Attribute("id").Value.Equals(newTag)
                        select nn;

And then your if statement is as simple as checking if any such elements exist:

if (checkName.Any())
{
    // Code if condition is met by any tag here
}

If you really need a bool instead, you can combine the query like so:

bool anyMatches = xdoc.Root.Elements("string")
                   .Where(x => x.Attributes("id").Value.Equals(newTag)).Any();

Finally, for completeness sake, you can move the predicate from the Where() into Any():

bool anyMatches = xdoc.Root.Elements("string")
                       .Any(x => x.Attributes("id").Value.Equals(newTag));

I pesonally prefer one of the former two methods, since I think they spell out more clearly what's going on. Up to you which you prefer, of course.

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No need for the Where, Any has an overload that takes a predicate. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Aug 15 '11 at 20:41
    
@Yuriy I know; I actually find it more readable with the Where() method, since it states in words what the Any() overload is actually doing. The performance impact is pretty minimal, since actual elements yielded and tested are identical. In fact, I prefer my first suggestion ever more, since now it's abundantly clear that my sequence is "elements that match some condition" and my if condition is "Do any such elements exist?" –  dlev Aug 15 '11 at 20:42
    
I can see that, I personally prefer the the wording of myEnumerable.Any(e matches this). –  Yuriy Faktorovich Aug 15 '11 at 20:44
    
thanks for all the replies, this worked just fine for me :) –  Sean Glover Aug 15 '11 at 21:53
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bool thisbool = xdoc.Root.Elements("string")
    .Any(e => e.Attribute("id").Value == newTag);
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Just off the top of my head

from n in source 
let x = n.Prop1
let y = n.Prop2
select (x == y) ? value : null;
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bool anySuchElementExists 
    = xdoc.Root.Elements("string")
      .Any(e => e.Attribute("id").Value == newTag);
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