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I have a list which is like,

tlist = [0.0, 0.07, 0.13, 0.15, 0.2, 0.22] (which is sorted)

I have another list which is,

newlist = [0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.16, 0.2] (numbers with a difference of 0.04)

I have to go through each item of the second list and check in which boundary (between which two numbers from the tlist) the number lies.

Like if I am checking for first item which is '0.0' from the second list then it falls between '0.0' and '0.07' in the first list.

Similarly, the next item in the second list which is '0.04' falls between '0.0' and '0.07' again in the first file.

So, for every item checked from the second list it should know its boundary. And it should set the boundaries. The result could be like, the range for '0.0' is x to y where x = 0.0 and y = 0.07.

If there is a number in tlist which is exactly the same as one of the numbers from the newlist then the program should neglect it or it can print a statement like "no boundary possible" and continue with the next number.

How do I put this into code. Thank you.

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1  
Which range does 0.07 fall into? –  Jim Garrison Aug 15 '11 at 20:38

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using the code you posted from your question Unexpected output from Newton's method, here a time function which correctly matches the boundary:

def time() :
    t_u = 0
    i = 0
    while i < len(tlist) - 1:
        # if the number is in the range
        # do the calculations and move to the next number
        if t_u > tlist[i] and t_u < tlist[i + 1] :
            print "\n The t_u value:", t_u, 'is between',
            print "start:", tlist[i], " and end: ", tlist[i+1]
            poly = poly_coeff(tlist[i], tlist[i + 1], t_u)
            Newton(poly)
            t_u = t_u + 0.04 # regular time interval
        # if the number is at the boundary of the range
        # go to the next number without doing the calculation
        elif t_u == tlist[i] or t_u == tlist[i + 1] :
            print "\n The t_u value:", t_u, 'is on the boundary of',
            print "start:", tlist[i], " and end: ", tlist[i+1]
            t_u = t_u + 0.04 # regular time interval
        # if the number isn't in the range, move to the next range
        else :
            i += 1
share|improve this answer
    
You might want to remove lines 10 and 11. –  zeekay Aug 17 '11 at 7:54
    
It appears quite out of place since there is no mention of the other question anywhere in your answer or the question. But, hey, nice answer besides that :D –  zeekay Aug 17 '11 at 8:04

If your First Array is Sorted, this should be pretty simple. for every number in the array 2 (call it 'z'), iterate once through array one and find the value with highest index which is smaller than z. This is your x. then find the smallest index of the value in array 1 which is greater or equal to 'z'. This is your y.

Hope that helps.Let me know if you need more explanation. Coding this should not be a big deal. If you get stuck while coding post the code and I can help you with it.

Thanks Shaunak

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tlist = [0.0, 0.07, 0.13, 0.15, 0.2, 0.22]
newlist = [0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.16, 0.2]

for n in newlist:
    print n
    for i in xrange(len(tlist) - 1):
        if tlist[i] <= n < tlist[i + 1]:
            print tlist[i], tlist[i + 1]
            break
    else:
        print "Not found"
    print ""

This prints out the following:

0.0
0.0 0.07

0.04
0.0 0.07

0.08
0.07 0.13

0.12
0.07 0.13

0.16
0.15 0.2

0.2
0.2 0.22

Assumptions: I assume you want inclusive on the lower bound, and not on the upper bound, and I assume your tlist is sorted.

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Somewhat plain and assuming tlist is sorted

def find_interval(tlist, item):
    for lower, upper in zip(tlist[:-1], tlist[1:]):
        if lower <= item < upper:
            return (lower, upper)
    return None # Or raise some "IntervalNotFoudException"

print((find_interval(tlist, item) for item in newlist))

Edit : Made it shorter using zip

share|improve this answer
    
But as you progress through the list, previous is not being updated. –  Brent Newey Aug 15 '11 at 20:48
    
Indeed, fixed it. –  Evpok Aug 15 '11 at 20:50
    
+1 for sussinctness, I would also assume that the method itself would be included in some for loop to handle all of the values in the second list, ie: for item in newlist: print find_interval(tlist, item) or whatever that may be. –  Jeff Langemeier Aug 15 '11 at 20:51
    
@Jeff Langemeier I'd rather use a generator expression or a list comprehension. –  Evpok Aug 15 '11 at 20:52
    
@Evpok, yeah, as would I, I was just going with, there's something that's being left out, and I went with the lowest common denominator for how it could be handled. –  Jeff Langemeier Aug 15 '11 at 20:56
>>> tlist = [0.0, 0.07, 0.13, 0.15, 0.2, 0.22]
>>> newlist = [0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.16, 0.2]
>>> def getrange(x):
...     for i in range(len(tlist)):
...         if tlist[i] > x:
...             return tlist[max(0, i-1)], tlist[i]
>>> [getrange(x) for x in newlist]
8: [(0.0, 0.07),
 (0.0, 0.07),
 (0.07, 0.13),
 (0.07, 0.13),
 (0.15, 0.2),
 (0.2, 0.22)]

Does this help?

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Many solutions... here's one using iterators:

tlist = [0.0, 0.07, 0.13, 0.15, 0.2, 0.22]
newlist = [0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.16, 0.2]

def range_finder(a,b):
  iter_a = iter(a)
  lower_a, upper_a = iter_a.next(), iter_a.next()
  for item in b:
    while True:
      if lower_a <= item < upper_a:
        print "%s is %s to %s" % (item,lower_a,upper_a)
        break
      else:
        lower_a = upper_a
        upper_a = iter_a.next()

range_finder(tlist,newlist)

Producing:

0.0 is 0.0 to 0.07
0.04 is 0.0 to 0.07
0.08 is 0.07 to 0.13
0.12 is 0.07 to 0.13
0.16 is 0.15 to 0.2
0.2 is 0.2 to 0.22
share|improve this answer

Simple approach using enumerate:

for n in newlist:
    for i, t in enumerate(tlist):
        if t > n:
            # found upper boundry, previous must be equal or lower
            upper, lower = t, tlist[i-1]
            break
    print lower, n, upper
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for extreme succinctness and clever thought of enumerate. –  Evpok Aug 15 '11 at 21:17
2  
This solution is O(n^2) –  jterrace Aug 16 '11 at 12:57
    
See my answer for an O(n*log(n)) solution. –  jterrace Aug 16 '11 at 13:52

You can use the bisect module for this:

import bisect
def bisect_range(sortedlist, tofind):
    for t in tofind:
        loc = bisect.bisect_right(sortedlist, t)
        yield (sortedlist[loc-1], sortedlist[loc])

tlist = [0.0, 0.07, 0.13, 0.15, 0.2, 0.22]
newlist = [0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.16, 0.2]
print list(bisect_range(sorted(tlist), newlist))

This is O(N * log(M)) where M is the length of the sorted list and N is the length of the items being searched, because the bisect_right function is O(log(M)) and we are calling it once for each item in the search list of length N. Sorting the initial list (if it's not already sorted) is O(M * log(M)).

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2  
Standard library, clever use of generators. The best answer so far. –  Evpok Aug 16 '11 at 21:38

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