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I am trying to match a single upper case char but none of the following are working. This is one and only one, not zero, not two or more.

[A-Z]
[A-Z]{1}
([A-Z]){1}

This works, but it matches 0 chars also

/^[A-Z]$/
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closed as too localized by Jeremy Banks, InfantPro'Aravind', palaѕн, Lev Levitsky, birryree Dec 31 '12 at 14:38

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6  
Weird, why would that match 0 chars...? – BoltClock Aug 15 '11 at 21:21
    
both of these regexes match exactly one uppercase letter – arnaud576875 Aug 15 '11 at 21:22

This works, but it matches 0 chars also

/^[A-Z]$/

I think you're incorrect. That pattern is right. Testing it in Chrome and Firefox's developer consoles, it has the behaviour you want.

/^[A-Z]$/.test("");   // false
/^[A-Z]$/.test(" ");  // false
/^[A-Z]$/.test("f");  // false
/^[A-Z]$/.test("F");  // true
/^[A-Z]$/.test("FF"); // false

How are you using it?

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