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So I will call a repository to retrieve the root object of a complex object graph, using FluentNHibernate. But for some sub-level objects I don't want to retrieve all elements, but only those where a date parameter equals certain condition. In below code, I want the lower level Order object to be filtered in this way by the OrderTime field.

Meaning I want to retrieve all UserGroups, with all Users, but the Orders object of each User shall only contain orders from a specific date or date range.

So what are my options on how to retrieve this object graph? I don't want lazy loading, I just want to specify a handful of different retrieval conditions, which will never change. So they can be separate functions of the repository, like suggested at the end. But how would I go about coding those methods, how to specify these conditions?

Objects:

public class UserGroup
{
    public int Id;
    public IList<User> Users;
}

public class User
{
    public int Id;
    public string Name;
    public IList<Order> Orders;
}

public class Order
{
    public int Id;
    public decimal Price;
    public System.DateTime OrderTime;
}

Repository:

public class UserGroupRepository
{    
    public List<UserGroup> GetAll()
    {
        using (ISession session = FNH_Manager.OpenSession()) {
            dynamic obj = session.CreateCriteria(typeof(UserGroup)).List<UserGroup>();
            return obj;
        }
    }
}

Potential new Repository methods: ?

public List<UserGroup> GetAll_FilterOrderDate(System.DateTime _date)
{
}

public List<UserGroup> GetAll_FilterOrderDate(List<System.DateTime> _dates)
{
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It really depends on what you want to do with the orders.

Is there a reason you need to query on the aggregate root? Would it make sense to query over the actual orders by date instead? So you'd end up with:

session.QueryOver<Order>().Where(t => t.OrderDate > ...);

If your associations are set up correctly you'll still be able to navigate to the user.

Personally I find the repository pattern to be a bit restrictive and would rather use query objects, so you'd end up with something like:

queryService.FindAll<UserGroup>(new GetAllByFilterOrderDate(DateTime.Now));

However if the concept of a repository works for you then by all means stick to it, but it means you'll try to force your object model into this 'UserGroup' centric view.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'm not sure if I need root query. But I'm loading the full object graph needed for the entire runtime, at startup. My purpose of retrieving the orders is for them to be loaded to the runtime objects, and then a range of logic will depend on them. Perhaps I could build the object graph more incrementally instead, by calling various services by query. Of course then I must learn how to code these services. But it's not exactly clear to me; Is it possible to put some type of drill-down condition in a repository method similar to what I'm using now? –  bretddog Aug 15 '11 at 22:57
    
@jonnii - That's an interesting implementation. Can you provide some more details on the implementation of the FindAll method/query class that you're using? –  csano Aug 15 '11 at 23:43

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