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I'm building a CMS blog with MVC and want users to leave comments on posts.

There are two types of users, users with accounts, and guest users that are not registered.

I am laying out the comment table that looks like this:

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`comment` (
  `id` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  `post_id` INT NOT NULL ,
  `user_id` INT NULL ,
  `username` VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL ,
  `email` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL ,
  `content` TEXT NOT NULL ,
  `createtime` DATETIME NOT NULL ,
  `approved` TINYINT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0 ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`) ,
  INDEX `FK_comment_user` (`user_id` ASC) ,
  INDEX `FK_comment_post` (`post_id` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `FK_comment_user`
    FOREIGN KEY (`user_id` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`user` (`id` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `FK_comment_post`
    FOREIGN KEY (`post_id` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`post` (`id` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE CASCADE)
ENGINE = InnoDB;

You can see user_id FK is not required because it could be a guest, before saving/validating, I can check to see if the model has a user_id, if so, I can grab the required data: username, email from the user table and inject into this comment model to validate the model.

My question is this: username and email will be redundant data if the user is registered. Also, if they update their email, I'd have to write custom code to cascade this change to this field in the comment. Therefore, would it be better to not require (drop NOT NULL) username and email?

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1 Answer 1

You could have just username, with the implicit understanding that it is an email address, or vice-versa. It's a common thing nowadays to use the two interchangeably.

Theoretically, you could also make a "stub" user for everyone who comments, with an autoincrement id and an email address... then you could keep the comments table only referencing a user id.

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I'm going to leave out database constraints and put the logic in the code. therefore, user_id, username, email can all be null. But my business logic should prevent them from all being null. –  Jay Aug 16 '11 at 17:31
    
I do like the stub idea as well, but I may look back into at a future date. –  Jay Aug 16 '11 at 17:31

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