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A View normally expects an object with these attributes before it can render:

{ el: '#someelement', model: someModel }

A View also allows us to bind the model's events to functions in the view:

initialize: function() {
    this.model.bind('change', this.renderFromModel, this);
},

render: function() {
    $(this.el).html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
    return this;
},

renderFromModel: function() {
    var t = _.template($('#some-template').html());
    $('item-' + this.cid).html(t(this.toJSON()));
    return this;
},

The problem is that the first time we instantiate a View for rendering, it is expecting an object with a Model in it; and the second time we render the view when it is called from within the Model, it is not. Because of this, I end up creating two render() functions.

Is there a better way of achieving single item render that can also respond to model.change() events?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

i think you need to ensure your render method is always bound the view by calling underscore.js' bindAll method.

SomeView = Backbone.View.extend({
  initialize: function(){
    _.bindAll(this, "render");
    this.model.bind('change', this.render);
  },

  render: function(){
    $(this.el).html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
    return this;
  }
});
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oh geeze, thanks! I guess I really need to read up on underscore.js –  rkw Aug 16 '11 at 4:45
4  
you can use this.$el instead of $(this.el): backbonejs.org/#View-$el (documentation) –  Fabdrol Dec 28 '12 at 11:52

A better solution is to use the listenTo function:

SomeView = Backbone.View.extend({
  initialize: function(){
    this.listenTo(this.model, 'change', this.render);
  },

  render: function(){
    this.$el.html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
    return this;
  }
});

This way the view object is aware of the bindings it made, and all of them can be removed with the stopListening function and doesn't need to call bind or bindAll explicitly. Last but not least the code is cleaner in my opinion.

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Shouldn't it be this.$el.html as mentioned in another comment ? –  Jeremie Parker Jan 1 at 16:45
    
updated, thanks –  Blacksonic Jan 2 at 11:25

create model instance in the view

var myapp.myView  = new View({
        model: new Model
    });

and when you initialize the Backbone.View inside add this .. which render will be called any time there is change is model attributes from it's defaults

this.model.bind('change', this.render,this)
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As of Backbone 0.9.2 (and possibly earlier), the on() or bind() function (as well as its counterpart off() or unbind()) takes an optional context parameter to use for this when called.

So,

SomeView = Backbone.View.extend({
  initialize: function(){
    _.bindAll(this, "render");
    this.model.bind('change', this.render);
  },

  render: function(){
    this.$el.html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
    return this;
  }
});

can become

SomeView = Backbone.View.extend({
  initialize: function(){
    this.model.bind('change', this.render, this);
  },

  render: function(){
    this.$el.html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
    return this;
  }
});

See the documentation for on().

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@muistooshort Yep! Good catch. I copied and pasted from the answer above (which is obviously a little old). –  mybuddymichael Sep 11 '12 at 2:17

Use _.bind() method to set scope

 this.model.bind('change', _.bind(this.render, this));
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1  
thanks ant_Ti. I read the documentation over and over, but it still escapes my understanding. How come that works? –  rkw Aug 16 '11 at 9:16
3  
try read this link –  ant_Ti Aug 16 '11 at 10:58
    
I think the behavior of this.model.bind("change" , this.render , this); and this.model.bind('change', _.bind(this.render, this)); are different, though the first one also defines the scope on this, but in my case what ant_Ti had suggested worked –  Varand pezeshk Feb 22 '12 at 20:03

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