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I want to alter the following Java script to make it more efficient

for(var i = 0; i < 1000; i += 1){
                var el = document.createElement('div');
                el.appendChild(document.createTextNode('Node ' + (i + 1)));
                document.getElementById('nodeHolder').appendChild(el);
}

Ideally it would be grateful if the reason behind it could be provided.

Any idea would be very much appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
You can also create a single div and clone it instead of using createElement numerous times. It's usually much faster. –  RobG Aug 16 '11 at 3:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Create a document fragment and append to that, then do a single append for the entire set.

var frag = document.createDocumentFragment();

for(var i = 0; i < 1000; i += 1){
    var el = document.createElement('div');
    el.appendChild(document.createTextNode('Node ' + (i + 1)));
    frag.appendChild(el);
}

document.getElementById('nodeHolder').appendChild( frag );

Now your getElementById only needs to run once, and the DOM only needs to update once.

The document fragment is a generic container. When appending it to the DOM, the container just disappears, and only its content is appended.


You can condense the code a bit if you like:

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/7hagb/

var frag = document.createDocumentFragment();

for(var i = 0; i < 1000; i += 1){
    frag.appendChild(document.createElement('div'))
        .appendChild(document.createTextNode('Node ' + (i + 1)));
}

document.getElementById('nodeHolder').appendChild( frag );

Additionally, a very minor optimization would be to get rid of the i + 1, and modify the for loop to provide the values you want.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/7hagb/1/

var frag = document.createDocumentFragment();

for(var i = 1; i <= 1000; i += 1){
    frag.appendChild(document.createElement('div'))
        .appendChild(document.createTextNode('Node ' + i));
}

document.getElementById('nodeHolder').appendChild( frag );
share|improve this answer

You can use DocumentFragment, a lightweight node container which prevents DOM from refreshing and reflowing when you append nodes on it.

var nodeHolder = document.createElement('div'),
    fragment = document.createDocumentFragment();
for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i ++ ) {
    var el = document.createElement('div');
    el.innerHTML = 'Node ' + (i + 1);
    fragment.appendChild(el);
}
nodeHolder.appendChild(fragment);
share|improve this answer

do not use DOM, just use html instead. for example instead of createElement use

  abc = ""
  for(...){
  abc += "<div>Text " + i + "</div>";
  }

and then append to the target. It is ugly, I agree, but should run much faster

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2  
Depends on your definition of "should". Actually, in some hugely abstract sense it "shouldn't" because the parser "should" have to parse the HTML and then call createElement and appendChild itself. In another sense, yes, many browsers, mysteriously, can parse text faster than Javascript can execute createElement calls. In yet another sense, other (newer) browsers act differently. In yet another sense, writing ugly code that runs faster in non-extreme situations is something you "shouldn't" really do ("extreme" meaning graphics, simulations, and other CPU-hogs). Just MHO. –  Malvolio Aug 16 '11 at 2:00
1  
I believe some versions of IE have memory issues with this sort of string concatenation. According to this article from Google: "String concatenation causes major problems with Internet Explorer 6 and 7 garbage collection performance.". –  user113716 Aug 16 '11 at 2:06
    
well, you can simple add string content after X iteration. but nice point though! –  mkk Aug 16 '11 at 2:11

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