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How to alter the JavaScript code below so that it can avoid exposing the variables and functions to the global scope?

var nMax = 10;
var i = 0;
var step = function(){
                //do stuff
                i += 1;
                if(i < nMax){
                                step();
                }else{
                                alert('finished');
                }
}
step();

Ideally it would be grateful if the reason behind it could be provided.

Any idea would be very much appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just wrap it in an anonymous function, and call that function immediately:

(function(){
    var nMax = 10;
    var i = 0;
    var step = function(){
                    //do stuff
                    i += 1;
                    if(i < nMax){
                                    step();
                    }else{
                                    alert('finished');
                    }
    }
    step();
})();

Another Example: http://jsfiddle.net/n5Srd/

share|improve this answer
    
D'oh. Beat me by six seconds. Actually, my way exposes the function name step, which I thought was what the OP wanted. YMMV. –  Malvolio Aug 16 '11 at 1:55
    
This way I cannot use step function outside of the anonymous function. –  ShankarSangoli Aug 16 '11 at 1:58
    
Haha yeah I was quick on this one :) He asked for how to not expose the function as well. –  Paulpro Aug 16 '11 at 1:58
    
@Shankar That's right, That's what the OP wants. For step, nMax and i to not be exposed to the outer scope. –  Paulpro Aug 16 '11 at 1:59
    
Either way, it's better to use a function declaration (as in my answer) than a function expression (as in the OP, this answer, and Malvolio's answer). Why? stackoverflow.com/questions/1013385 –  Matt Ball Aug 16 '11 at 2:00

The standard way would be

var step = function(){
  var nMax = 10;
  var i = 0;
  return function() {
                //do stuff
                i += 1;
                if(i < nMax){
                                step();
                }else{
                                alert('finished');
                }
  };
}();
step();
share|improve this answer
    
This also doesn't hide the function from the outer scope. –  Paulpro Aug 16 '11 at 2:06

An alternative to using a closure: functions are objects, so you can attach values to them just like any other object:

function step()
{
    step.i++;

    if (step.i < step.nMax) step();
    else alert('finished');
}

step();

Or, use an object to namespace the function and variables:

var stepper = 
{
    i: 0,
    nMax: 10,
    step: function ()
    {
        this.i++;

        if (this.i < this.nMax) this.step();
        else alert('finished');
    }
};

stepper.step();

And here's a cleaner version of @PaulPRO's answer which uses a function declaration rather than a function expression:

(function ()
{
    var i = 0,
        nMax = 10;

    function step()
    {
        i++;

        if (i < nMax) step();
        else alert('finished');
    }

    step();
})();
share|improve this answer
    
True (+1). However, there is only one "step" function-object. Thus, the behavior may or may not be as desired... also can use arguments.callee to avoid specifying step... –  user166390 Aug 16 '11 at 1:58
    
You're right (and probably already know what I'm about to say) but arguments.callee should be avoided since there is a better, more efficient, simple alternative. –  Matt Ball Aug 16 '11 at 2:03
    
This doesn't solve the OP's problem of hiding the function from the outer scope. If he already has a function called step, or a variable named stepper it will conflict –  Paulpro Aug 16 '11 at 2:05
    
@Matt In which browser won't my code work, and why? –  Paulpro Aug 16 '11 at 2:15
1  
@Matt Ah, I see. No worries :) –  Paulpro Aug 16 '11 at 2:21

Put in an object so fn gets called via that:-

 var stepHolder = {};
 stepHolder.step = (function(nMax){
 var i = 0;
 return function step(){
            //do stuff
             i += 1;
            if(i < nMax){
                            step();
            }else{
                            alert('finished');
            }
  };}
  )(10);

    stepHolder.step();
share|improve this answer
    
That 3 is nMax and should be 10 –  QuentinUK Aug 16 '11 at 2:39
    
Stack Exchange sites have this fantastic feature called edit. Check it out. –  Matt Ball Aug 16 '11 at 3:15

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