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I want to dynamically create multiple Processes, where each instance has a queue for incoming messages from other instances, and each instance can also create new instances. So we end up with a network of processes all sending to each other. Every instance is allowed to send to every other.

The code below would do what I want: it uses a Manager.dict() to store the queues, making sure updates are propagated, and a Lock() to protect write-access to the queues. However when adding a new queue it throws "RuntimeError: Queue objects should only be shared between processes through inheritance".

The problem is that when starting-up, we don't know how many queues will eventually be needed, so we have to create them dynamically. But since we can't share queues except at construction time, I don't know how to do that.

I know that one possibility would be to make queues a global variable instead of a managed one passed-in to __init__: the problem then, as I understand it, is that additions to the queues variable wouldn't be propagated to other processes.

EDIT I'm working on evolutionary algorithms. EAs are a type of machine learning technique. An EA simulates a "population", which evolves by survival of the fittest, crossover, and mutation. In parallel EAs, as here, we also have migration between populations, corresponding to interprocess communication. Islands can also spawn new islands, and so we need a way to send messages between dynamically-created processes.

import random, time
from multiprocessing import Process, Queue, Lock, Manager, current_process
try:
    from queue import Empty as EmptyQueueException
except ImportError:
    from Queue import Empty as EmptyQueueException

class MyProcess(Process):
    def __init__(self, queues, lock):
        super(MyProcess, self).__init__(target=lambda x: self.run(x),
                                     args=tuple())
        self.queues = queues
        self.lock = lock
        # acquire lock and add a new queue for this process
        with self.lock:
            self.id = len(list(self.queues.keys()))
            self.queues[self.id] = Queue()

    def run(self):
        while len(list(self.queues.keys())) < 10:

            # make a new process
            new = MyProcess(self.lock)
            new.start()

            # send a message to a random process
            dest_key = random.choice(list(self.queues.keys()))
            dest = self.queues[dest_key]
            dest.put("hello to %s from %s" % (dest_key, self.id))

            # receive messages
            message = True
            while message:
                try:
                    message = self.queues[self.id].get(False) # don't block
                    print("%s received: %s" % (self.id, message))
                except EmptyQueueException:
                    break

            # what queues does this process know about?
            print("%d: I know of %s" %
                  (self.id, " ".join([str(id) for id in self.queues.keys()])))

            time.sleep(1)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # Construct MyProcess with a Manager.dict for storing the queues
    # and a lock to protect write access. Start.
    MyProcess(Manager().dict(), Lock()).start()
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not entirely sure what your use case actually is here. Perhaps if you elaborate a bit more on why you want to have each process dynamically spawn a child with a connected queue it'll be a bit more clear what the right solution would be in this situation.

Anyway, with the question as is it seems that there is not really a good way to dynamically create pipes or queues with Multiprocessing right now.

I think that if you're willing to spawn threads within each of your processes you may be able to use multiprocessing.connection.Listener/Client to communicate back and forth. Rather than spawning threads I took an approach using network sockets and select to communicate between threads.

Dynamic process spawning and network sockets may still be flaky depending on how multiprocessing cleans up your file descriptors when spawning/forking a new process and your solution will most likely work more easily on *nix derivatives. If you're concerned about socket overhead you could use unix domain sockets to be a little more lightweight at the cost of added complexity running nodes on multiple worker machines.

Anyway, here's an example using network sockets and a global process list to accomplish this since I was unable to find a good way to make multiprocessing do it.

import collections
import multiprocessing
import random
import select
import socket
import time


class MessagePassingProcess(multiprocessing.Process):
    def __init__(self, id_, processes):
        self.id = id_
        self.processes = processes
        self.queue = collections.deque()
        super(MessagePassingProcess, self).__init__()

    def run(self):
        print "Running"
        inputs = []
        outputs = []
        server = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        address = self.processes[self.id]["address"]
        print "Process %s binding to %s"%(self.id, address)
        server.bind(address)
        server.listen(5)
        inputs.append(server)
        process = self.processes[self.id]
        process["listening"] = True
        self.processes[self.id] = process
        print "Process %s now listening!(%s)"%(self.id, process)
        while inputs:
            readable, writable, exceptional = select.select(inputs,
                                                           outputs,
                                                           inputs,
                                                           0.1)
            for sock in readable:
                print "Process %s has a readable scoket: %s"%(self.id,
                                                              sock)
                if sock is server:
                    print "Process %s has a readable server scoket: %s"%(self.id,
                                                              sock)
                    conn, addr = sock.accept()
                    conn.setblocking(0)
                    inputs.append(conn)
                else:
                    data = sock.recv(1024)
                    if data:
                        self.queue.append(data)
                        print "non server readable socket with data"
                    else:
                        inputs.remove(sock)
                        sock.close()
                        print "non server readable socket with no data"

            for sock in exceptional:
                print "exception occured on socket %s"%(sock)
                inputs.remove(sock)
                sock.close()

            while len(self.queue) >= 1:
                print "Received:", self.queue.pop()

            # send a message to a random process:
            random_id = random.choice(list(self.processes.keys()))
            print "%s Attempting to send message to %s"%(self.id, random_id)
            random_process = self.processes[random_id]
            print "random_process:", random_process
            if random_process["listening"]:
                random_address = random_process["address"]
                s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
                try:
                    s.connect(random_address)
                except socket.error:
                    print "%s failed to send to %s"%(self.id, random_id)
                else:
                    s.send("Hello World!")                    
                finally:
                    s.close()

            time.sleep(1)

if __name__=="__main__":
    print "hostname:", socket.getfqdn()
    print dir(multiprocessing)
    manager = multiprocessing.Manager()
    processes = manager.dict()
    joinable = []
    for n in xrange(multiprocessing.cpu_count()):
        mpp = MessagePassingProcess(n, processes)
        processes[n] = {"id":n,
                        "address":("127.0.0.1",7000+n),
                        "listening":False,
                        }
        print "processes[%s] = %s"%(n, processes[n])
        mpp.start()
        joinable.append(mpp)
    for process in joinable:
        process.join()

With a lot of polish and testing love this might be a logical extension to multiprocessing.Process and/or multiprocessing.Pool as this does seem like something people would use if it were available in the standard lib. It may also be reasonable to create a DynamicQueue class that uses sockets to be discoverable to other queues.

Anyway, hope it helps. Please update if you figure out a better way to make this work.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is really useful, thanks. I've added a little info on the use-case to the original question. The advantage of queues is not having to think about buffers, pickling, incomplete recvs, and so on. But I can see now that a connected queue wasn't necessary: sockets will work fine with a little extra work. I took your code and changed it: can now send objects via pickle, can create new processes, and each new process now adds itself to the dictionary. I'll add my code as a separate answer. –  jmmcd Aug 16 '11 at 21:02
    
I'm really glad I could help. –  stderr Aug 16 '11 at 23:21

This code is based on Mike Steder's above. It's in Python 3 since OSX Snow Leopard segfaults on some uses of multiprocessing stuff.

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import collections
from multiprocessing import Process, Manager, Lock, cpu_count
import random
import select
import socket
import time
import pickle

class Message:
    def __init__(self, origin):
        self.type = "long_msg"
        self.data = "X" * 3000
        self.origin = origin
    def __str__(self):
        return "%s %d" % (self.type, self.origin)

class MessagePassingProcess(Process):
    def __init__(self, processes, lock):
        self.lock = lock
        self.processes = processes
        with self.lock:
            self.id = len(list(processes.keys()))
            process_dict = {"id": self.id,
                            "address": ("127.0.0.1", 7000 + self.id),
                            "listening": False
                            }
            self.processes[self.id] = process_dict
        print("new process: processes[%s] = %s" % (self.id, processes[self.id]))
        self.queue = collections.deque()
        super(MessagePassingProcess, self).__init__()

    def run(self):
        print("Running")
        self.processes[self.id]["joinable"] = True
        inputs = []
        outputs = []
        server = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        address = self.processes[self.id]["address"]
        print("Process %s binding to %s" % (self.id, address))
        server.bind(address)
        server.listen(5)
        inputs.append(server)
        process = self.processes[self.id]
        process["listening"] = True
        self.processes[self.id] = process
        print("Process %s now listening!(%s)" % (self.id, process))
        while inputs and len(list(self.processes.keys())) < 10:
            readable, writable, exceptional = select.select(inputs,
                                                           outputs,
                                                           inputs,
                                                           0.1)
            # read incoming messages
            for sock in readable:
                print("Process %s has a readable socket: %s" % (self.id, sock))
                if sock is server:
                    print("Process %s has a readable server socket: %s" %
                          (self.id, sock))
                    conn, addr = sock.accept()
                    conn.setblocking(0)
                    inputs.append(conn)
                else:
                    data = True
                    item = bytes() # empty bytes object, to be added to
                    recvs = 0
                    while data:
                        data = sock.recv(1024)
                        item += data
                        recvs += 1
                    if len(item):
                        self.queue.append(item)
                        print("non server readable socket: recvd %d bytes in %d parts"
                              % (len(item), recvs))
                    else:
                        inputs.remove(sock)
                        sock.close()
                        print("non server readable socket: nothing to read")

            for sock in exceptional:
                print("exception occured on socket %s" % (sock))
                inputs.remove(sock)
                sock.close()

            while len(self.queue):
                msg = pickle.loads(self.queue.pop())
                print("received:" + str(msg))

            # send a message to a random process:
            random_id = random.choice(list(self.processes.keys()))
            print("%s attempting to send message to %s" % (self.id, random_id))
            random_process = self.processes[random_id]
            if random_process["listening"]:
                random_address = random_process["address"]
                s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
                try:
                    s.connect(random_address)
                except socket.error:
                    print("%s failed to send to %s"%(self.id, random_id))
                else:
                    item = pickle.dumps(Message(self.id))
                    print("sending a total of %d bytes" % len(item))
                    s.sendall(item)
                finally:
                    s.close()

            # make a new process
            if random.random() < 0.1:
                mpp = MessagePassingProcess(self.processes, self.lock)
                mpp.start()
            else:
                time.sleep(1.0)
        print("process %d finished looping" % self.id)


if __name__=="__main__":
    manager = Manager()
    processes = manager.dict()
    lock = Lock()
    # make just one process: it will make more
    mpp = MessagePassingProcess(processes, lock)
    mpp.start()
    # this doesn't join on all the other processes created
    # subsequently
    mpp.join()
share|improve this answer

The standard library socketserver is provided to help avoid programming select() manually. In this version, we start a socketserver in a separate thread so that each Process can do (well, pretend to do) computation in its main loop.

#!/usr/bin/env python3

# Each Node is an mp.Process. It opens a client-side socket to send a
# message to another Node. Each Node listens using a separate thread
# running a socketserver (so avoiding manual programming of select()),
# which itself starts a new thread to handle each incoming connection.
# The socketserver puts received messages on an mp.Queue, where they
# are picked up by the Node for processing once per loop. This setup
# allows the Node to do computation in its main loop.

import multiprocessing as mp
import threading, random, socket, socketserver, time, pickle, queue

class Message:
    def __init__(self, origin):
        self.type = "long_message"
        self.data = "X" * random.randint(0, 2000)
        self.origin = origin
    def __str__(self):
        return "Message of type %s, length %d from %d" % (
            self.type, len(self.data), self.origin)

class Node(mp.Process):
    def __init__(self, nodes, lock):
        super().__init__()

        # Add this node to the Manager.dict of node descriptors.
        # Write-access is protected by a Lock.
        self.nodes = nodes
        self.lock = lock
        with self.lock:
            self.id = len(list(nodes.keys()))
            host = "127.0.0.1"
            port = 7022 + self.id
            node = {"id": self.id, "address": (host, port), "listening": False}
            self.nodes[self.id] = node
        print("new node: nodes[%s] = %s" % (self.id, nodes[self.id]))

        # Set up socketserver.

        # don't know why collections.deque or queue.Queue don't work here.
        self.queue = mp.Queue()

        # This MixIn usage is directly from the python.org
        # socketserver docs
        class ThreadedTCPServer(socketserver.ThreadingMixIn,
                                socketserver.TCPServer):
            pass
        class HandlerWithQueue(socketserver.BaseRequestHandler):
            # Something of a hack: using class variables to give the
            # Handler access to this Node-specific data
            handler_queue = self.queue
            handler_id = self.id
            def handle(self):
                # could receive data in multiple chunks, so loop and
                # concatenate
                item = bytes()
                recvs = 0
                data = True
                if data:
                    data = self.request.recv(4096)
                    item += data
                    recvs += 1
                if len(item):
                    # Receive a pickle here and put it straight on
                    # queue. Will be unpickled when taken off queue.
                    print("%d: socketserver received %d bytes in %d recv()s"
                          % (self.handler_id, len(item), recvs))
                    self.handler_queue.put(item)

        self.server = ThreadedTCPServer((host, port), HandlerWithQueue)
        self.server_thread = threading.Thread(target=self.server.serve_forever)
        self.server_thread.setDaemon(True) # Tell it to exit when Node exits.
        self.server_thread.start()
        print("%d: server loop running in thread %s" %
              (self.id, self.server_thread.getName()))

        # Now ready to receive
        with self.lock:
            # Careful: if we assign directly to
            # self.nodes[self.id]["listening"], the new value *won't*
            # be propagated to other Nodes by the Manager.dict. Have
            # to use this hack to re-assign the Manager.dict key.
            node = self.nodes[self.id]
            node["listening"] = True
            self.nodes[self.id] = node

    def send(self):
        # Find a destination. All listening nodes are eligible except self.
        dests = [node for node in self.nodes.values()
                 if node["id"] != self.id and node["listening"]]
        if len(dests) < 1:
            print("%d: no node to send to" % self.id)
            return
        dest = random.choice(dests)
        print("%d: sending to %s" % (self.id, dest["id"]))

        # send
        s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        try:
            s.connect(dest["address"])
        except socket.error:
            print("%s: failed to send to %s" % (self.id, dest["id"]))
        else:
            item = pickle.dumps(Message(self.id))
            s.sendall(item)
        finally:
            s.close()

    # Check our queue for incoming messages.
    def receive(self):
        while True:
            try:
                message = pickle.loads(self.queue.get(False))
                print("%d: received %s" % (self.id, str(message)))
            except queue.Empty:
                break

    def run(self):
        print("%d: in run()" % self.id)
        # Main loop. Loop until at least 10 Nodes exist. Because of
        # parallel processing we might get a few more
        while len(list(self.nodes.keys())) < 10:
            time.sleep(random.random() * 0.5) # simulate heavy computation
            self.send()
            time.sleep(random.random() * 0.5) # simulate heavy computation
            self.receive()
            # maybe make a new node
            if random.random() < 0.1:
                new = Node(self.nodes, self.lock)
                new.start()
        # Seems natural to call server_thread.shutdown() here, but it
        # hangs. But since we've set the thread to be a daemon, it
        # will exit when this process does.
        print("%d: finished" % self.id)

if __name__=="__main__":
    manager = mp.Manager()
    nodes = manager.dict()
    lock = mp.Lock()
    # make just one node: it will make more
    node0 = Node(nodes, lock)
    node0.start()
    # This doesn't join on all the other nodes created subsequently.
    # But everything seems to work out ok.
    node0.join()
share|improve this answer
    
It's important to note that select / socketserver are both very different models: socketserver uses threading/forking and blocking sockets while select uses a single process with non-blocking sockets. –  stderr Aug 19 '11 at 14:18
    
@Mike Good point, thanks. I hope I understand right: from the listener's point of view, having non-blocking sockets in-process has much the same effect as having blocking sockets in a dedicated process/thread: in both cases the messages end up being processed once per iteration. However from the sender's point of view, it is easier to do a "fire-and-forget" send to a blocking socket, since it is "guaranteed" (in reality, there are no guarantees) to be listening rather than computing in some other part of its loop. –  jmmcd Aug 20 '11 at 1:34

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