Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There're plenty of different CSS shapes over at http://css-tricks.com/examples/ShapesOfCSS/ and I'm particularly puzzled with a triangle:

Triangle

#triangle-up {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 100px solid red;
}

So, how and why does it work?

share|improve this question
36  
You can: jsfiddle.net/wbZet –  mskfisher Aug 16 '11 at 12:40
90  
Holy reputation batman! If I'd known something as simple as CSS triangles would get a bajillion upvotes, I'd have asked the question months ago. –  zzzzBov Aug 16 '11 at 13:26
29  
How about the square that's not there? jsfiddle.net/minitech/sZgaa –  minitech Aug 16 '11 at 16:31
14  
I can't triforce either :-( ▲ ▲ ▲ –  ESultanik Aug 16 '11 at 19:08
11  
A buddy of mine has a page with an explanation and an application using it to build 3d objects: uselesspickles.com/triangles –  Juan Mendes Aug 17 '11 at 0:37

11 Answers 11

up vote 1235 down vote accepted

CSS Triangles: A Tragedy in Five Acts

As alex said, borders of equal width butt up against each other at 45 degree angles:

borders meet at 45 degree angles, content in middle

When you have no top border, it looks like this:

no top border

Then you give it a width of 0...

no width

...and a height of 0...

no height either

...and finally, you make the two side borders transparent:

transparent side borders

That results in a triangle.

The End

share|improve this answer
343  
Quality answers, such as "CSS Triangles: A Tragedy in Five Acts," is made possible by the generous upvotes of readers like you. –  sdleihssirhc Aug 16 '11 at 4:18
27  
+1 If only I'd had drawn a picture... :D –  alex Aug 16 '11 at 6:20
12  
@alex If you have scissors strong enough to cut through your monitor, you can make a flip book! –  sdleihssirhc Aug 16 '11 at 6:22
3  
@Jauzsika, you can add these triangles into a page without adding additional elements simply by using :before or :after pseudo classes. –  zzzzBov Aug 16 '11 at 13:24
23  
Act with animations: jsfiddle.net/pimvdb/mA4Cu/104. Just for those of us who need even more visual proof like me... –  pimvdb Aug 18 '11 at 20:26

The borders use an angled edge where they intersect (45° angle with equal width borders, but changing the border widths can skew the angle).

Border example

jsFiddle.

By hiding certain borders, you can get the triangle effect (as you can see above by making the different portions different colours). transparent is often used as an edge colour to achieve the triangle shape.

share|improve this answer

Start with a basic square and borders. Each border will be given a different color so we can tell them apart:

.triangle {
    border-color: yellow blue red green;
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 200px 200px 200px 200px;
    height: 0px;
    width: 0px;
}

which gives you this:

square with four borders

But there's no need for the top border, so set its width to 0px. Now our border-bottom of 200px will make our triangle 200px tall.

.triangle {
    border-color: yellow blue red green;
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 0px 200px 200px 200px;
    height: 0px;
    width: 0px;
}

and we will get this:

bottom half of square with four borders

Then to hide the two side triangles, set the border-color to transparent. Since the top-border has been effectively deleted, we can set the border-top-color to transparent as well.

.triangle {
    border-color: transparent transparent red transparent;
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 0px 200px 200px 200px;
    height: 0px;
    width: 0px;
}

finally we get this:

triangular bottom border

share|improve this answer
14  
Cool, but isn't this the same way? :-) –  Stanislav Shabalin Aug 17 '11 at 11:33
3  
There's another way to draw .., which turns out to be the same way :) Nice explanation though –  Nick Aug 17 '11 at 19:21
9  
-1 for using JPEGs with massive artifacts. But +1 for creating a great example of when not to use JPEGs that I can link to in the future for deterrance. ;) –  hheimbuerger Aug 18 '11 at 8:24
2  
why isn't a gif used instead here? –  prusswan Dec 7 '11 at 8:37
2  
Sorry @hheimbuerger, I messed up your example by fixing the images. You’ll have to link to revision 2 of this answer in the future. –  Rory O'Kane Aug 15 '12 at 20:05

Here is an animation in JSFiddle I created for demonstration:

CSS triangle animation

HTML

<div class="border"></div>

CSS

.border {
    margin: 50px;
    width: 50px;
    height: 50px;
    border-width: 50px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-top-color: green;
    border-right-color: yellow;
    border-bottom-color: red;
    border-left-color: blue;
    cursor: pointer
}

JavaScript

$('#a').click(function() {$('.border').trigger("click");});
(function($) {
    var duration = 1000
    $('.border').click(function() {
        $(this)
            .animate({
                'border-top-width': 0
            }, duration)
            .animate({
                'border-left-width': 30
            }, duration)
            .animate({
                'border-right-width': 30
            }, duration)
            .animate({
                'border-bottom-width': 80
            }, duration)
            .animate({
                'width': 0
            }, duration)
            .animate({
                'height': 0
            }, duration)
            .animate({
                'borderRightColor': 'transparent'
            }, duration)
            .animate({
                'borderLeftColor': 'transparent'
            }, duration)
    }).end()
}(jQuery))
share|improve this answer

We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed.

1  
@totymedli Thanks a lot for the animation capture –  HerrSerker Aug 4 at 9:07
    
You're welcome;) –  totymedli Aug 4 at 10:42

Taking it one step further, using css based on this I added arrows to my back and next buttons (yes I know its not 100% cross-browser, but slick none the less).

Here's the HTML:

<div class="triangle"></div>
<div class="triangle triangle-down"></div>
<div class="triangle triangle-left"></div>
<div class="triangle triangle-right"></div>

<a class="triangle-before triangle-before-left" href="#">Back</a>
<a class="triangle-after triangle-after-right" href="#">Next</a>

And here's the CSS:

.triangle {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 100px solid red;
    margin:20px auto;
}

.triangle-down {
    border-bottom:none;
    border-top: 100px solid red;
}

.triangle-left {
    border-left:none;
    border-right: 100px solid red;
    border-bottom: 50px solid transparent;
    border-top: 50px solid transparent;
}

.triangle-right {
    border-right:none;
    border-left: 100px solid red;
    border-bottom: 50px solid transparent;
    border-top: 50px solid transparent;
}

.triangle-after:after {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border-left: 5px solid transparent;
    border-right: 5px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 5px solid red;
    margin:0 5px;
    content:"";
    display:inline-block;
}

.triangle-after-right:after {
    border-right:none;
    border-left: 5px solid blue;
    border-bottom: 5px solid transparent;
    border-top: 5px solid transparent;

}

.triangle-before:before {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border-left: 5px solid transparent;
    border-right: 5px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 5px solid blue;
    margin:0 5px;
    content:"";
    display:inline-block;
}

.triangle-before-left:before {
    border-left:none;
    border-right: 5px solid blue;
    border-bottom: 5px solid transparent;
    border-top: 5px solid transparent;

}

Here is the jsFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
how is this not cross browser? triangles should work back to IE6. –  dustynachos Dec 30 '11 at 19:58
3  
the use of :before and :after are not 100% supported. –  PseudoNinja Dec 30 '11 at 20:47
1  
Psuedo-elements are not supported < IE8. –  alex Feb 14 '12 at 22:49

Consider the below triangle

.triangle {
    border-bottom:15px solid #000;
    border-left:10px solid transparent;
    border-right:10px solid transparent;
    width:0;
    height:0;
}

This is what we are given:

Small triangle output

Why it came out in this shape? The below diagram explains the dimensions, note that 15px was used for the bottom border and 10px was used for left and right.

Large triangle

It's pretty easy to make a right-angle triangle also by removing the right border.

Right angle triangle

share|improve this answer

Lets say we have the following div:

<div id="triangle" />

Now Edit the CSS step-by-step, so you will get clear idea what is happening around

STEP 1: JSfiddle Link:

 #triangle {
        background: purple;
        width :150px;
        height:150PX;
        border-left: 50px solid black ;
        border-right: 50px solid black;
        border-bottom: 50px solid black;
        border-top: 50px solid black;
    }

This is a simple div. With a very simple CSS. So a layman can understand. Div has dimensions 150 x 150 pixels with the border 50 pixels. The image is attached:

enter image description here

STEP 2: JSfiddle Link:

#triangle {
    background: purple;
    width :150px;
    height:150PX;
    border-left: 50px solid yellow ;
    border-right: 50px solid green;
    border-bottom: 50px solid red;
    border-top: 50px solid blue;
}

Now I just changed the border-color of all 4 sides. The image is attached.

enter image description here

STEP:3 JSfiddle Link:

#triangle {
    background: purple;
    width :0;
    height:0;
    border-left: 50px solid yellow ;
    border-right: 50px solid green;
    border-bottom: 50px solid red;
    border-top: 50px solid blue;
}

Now I just changed the height & width of div from 150 pixels to zero. The image is attached

enter image description here

STEP 4: JSfiddle:

#triangle {
    background: purple;
    width :0px;
    height:0px;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 50px solid red;
    border-top: 50px solid transparent;
}

Now I have made all the borders transparent apart from the bottom border. The image is attached below.

enter image description here

STEP 5: JSfiddle Link:

#triangle {
    background: white;
    width :0px;
    height:0px;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 50px solid red;
    border-top: 50px solid transparent;
}

Now I just changed the background color to white. The image is attached.

enter image description here

Hence we got the triangle we needed. Thank you !!

share|improve this answer

Different approach using transform rotate

Triangular shape is pretty easy to make using this technique. For people who prefer to see an animation explaining how this technique works, you can follow this link : Animation, how to make a CSS triangle with transform rotate

DEMO : triangles made with transform rotate

Otherwise, here is a more detailed explanation 4 acts (this is not a tragedy) of how to make a isosceles right-angled triangle with one element (note: for non isosceles triangles, you can see step 4):

HTML :

<div class="tr"></div>

STEP 1 : Make a div

Easy, just make shure that width = 1.41 x height. You may use any techinque (see here) including the use of percentages and padding-bottom to maintain the aspect ratio and make a responsive triangle. In the following image, the div has a golden yellow border.

In that div, insert a pseudo element (I would suggest the :before pseudo element so that you can add content over it without playing with z-index) and give it 100% width and height of parent. The pseudo element has a blue background in the following image.

Making a CSS triangle with transform roate step1

At this point, we have this CSS :

.tr{
    width:30%;
    padding-bottom:21.27%; /* = width / 1.41 */
    position:relative;
}

.tr:before{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    top:0; left:0;
    width:100%; height:100%;
    background : #0079C6;
}

STEP 2 : Let's rotate

First, most important : define a transform origin. The default origin is in the center of the pseudo element and we need it at the bottom left. by adding this CSS to the pseudo element :
transform-origin:0 100%; or transform-origin: left bottom;

Now we can rotate the pseudo element 45 degrees clockwise with transform : rotate(45deg);

Creating a triangle with CSS3 step 2

At this point, we have this CSS :

.tr{
    width:30%;
    padding-bottom:21.27%; /* = width / 1.41 */
    position:relative;
}
.tr:before{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    top:0; left:0;
    width:100%; height:100%;
    background : #0079C6;

    -webkit-transform-origin:0 100%;
    -ms-transform-origin:0 100%;
    transform-origin:0 100%;

    -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
    transform: rotate(45deg);
}

STEP 3 : hide it

To hide the unwanted parts of the pseudo element (everything that overflows the div with the yellow border) you just need to set overflow:hidden; on the container. after reomving the yellow border, you get... a TRIANGLE! :

DEMO

CSS triangle

CSS :

.tr{
    width:30%;
    padding-bottom:21.27%; /* = width / 1.41 */
    position:relative;
    overflow:hidden;
}
.tr:before{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    top:0; left:0;
    width:100%; height:100%;

    background-color : #0079C6;

    -webkit-transform-origin:0 100%;
    -ms-transform-origin:0 100%;
    transform-origin:0 100%;

    -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
    transform: rotate(45deg);
}

STEP 4 go further

As shown in the demo, you can customize the triangles :

  1. Make them thinner or flatter by playing with skewX().
  2. Make them point left, right or any other direction by playing with the transform orign and rotation direction.
  3. Make some reflexion with 3D transform property.
  4. Give the triangle borders
  5. Much more...

Why use this technique?

  1. Triangle can easily be responsive
  2. You can make a triangle with border
  3. You can maintain the boundaries of the triangle, this means that you can allow a click only inside the triangle or like in the following example, trigger the hover state only when the cursor is inside the triangle DEMO this can become very handy in some situations like this one.
  4. You can make some fancy effects like reflections
  5. It will help you understand 2d and 3d transform properties

Why not use this technique?

  1. The main drawback is the browser compatibility, the 2d transform properties are supported by IE9+ and therefore you can't use this technique if you plan on supporting IE8. See CanIuse for more info. For some fancy effects using 3d transform like the reflection browser support is IE10+ (see canIuse for more info).
  2. You don't need anything responsive and a plain triangle is fine for you then you should go for the border technique explained here : better browser compatibility and easier to understand thanks to the amaizing posts here.
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm loving it. Nice job. –  Hashem Qolami Aug 18 at 11:06

Different approach. With linear gradient (for IE, only IE 10+). You can use any angle:

.triangle {
    margin: 50px auto;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
/* linear gradient */
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(-45deg,  rgba(255,0,0,0) 0%, rgba(255,0,0,0) 50%, rgba(255,0,0,1) 50%, rgba(255,0,0,1) 100%);
 /* FF3.6+ */
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right bottom, color-stop(0%,rgba(255,0,0,0)), color-stop(50%,rgba(255,0,0,0)), color-stop(50%,rgba(255,0,0,1)), color-stop(100%,rgba(255,0,0,1)));
 /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(-45deg,  rgba(255,0,0,0) 0%,rgba(255,0,0,0) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 100%);
 /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
    background: -o-linear-gradient(-45deg,  rgba(255,0,0,0) 0%,rgba(255,0,0,0) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 100%);
 /* Opera 11.10+ */
    background: -ms-linear-gradient(-45deg,  rgba(255,0,0,0) 0%,rgba(255,0,0,0) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 100%);
 /* IE10+ */
    background: linear-gradient(135deg,  rgba(255,0,0,0) 0%,rgba(255,0,0,0) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 50%,rgba(255,0,0,1) 100%);
 /* W3C */;
}

Here is jsfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
This is a beautiful solution, but it should be noted that it's IE 10+ only. –  Eric Hu Oct 4 '13 at 0:33

I made a sample in enjoycss

http://enjoycss.com/5p#border

you can play with it and see how the thing changes ;)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

The best explanation of CSS Triangles I've seen is this HTML/CSS animation: http://codepen.io/chriscoyier/full/lotjh/

share|improve this answer

protected by NullPoiиteя Jun 10 '13 at 5:10

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.