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In C#, what is the difference between String and string? (note the case)

Example:

string s = "Hello, World";

String S = "Hello, World";

Also, what are the guidelines for the use of each?

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138  
In effect, all it is is using string = System.String; –  Dominic Zukiewicz Mar 8 '13 at 21:17
61  
It isn't quite using string = System.String;, as string is a key word in the C# language specification and is recognized by the compiler itself, yeah? Which also means that string is ECMA compatible (with the C# spec) while System.String really isn't. The using blah = Type stuff is basically syntactical sugar to allow mere mortals to ask the compiler to do substitutions during pre-parsing so you don't have to use 47 characters of dot-separated type specification for every variable in cases where you have name collisions. Using it in other situations is probably undesirable. –  Craig May 23 '13 at 23:21
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Jegan, they are not different. They are exactly the same. String.GetType() == string.GetType() –  enorl76 Aug 15 '13 at 14:40
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@Jegan: you're executing an instance method on a type. It's typeof(string) == typeof(System.String). String only works if you have a using System; –  Snake Oct 31 '13 at 14:23
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Just another way of looking at this. string is a primitive defined by the language while System.String is a class defined by the BCL. They map to one another in .NET and the MS C# compiler. But... C# the language might get implemented by somebody else on a different runtime/BCL where there is no System.String. same argument for int/Int32 –  AZ. Dec 3 '13 at 14:52

42 Answers 42

up vote 1779 down vote accepted

string is an alias for System.String. So technically, there is no difference. It's like int vs. System.Int32.

As far as guidelines, I think it's generally recommended to use string any time you're referring to an object.

e.g.

string place = "world";

Likewise, I think it's generally recommended to use String if you need to refer specifically to the class.

e.g.

string greet = String.Format("Hello {0}!", place);

This is the style that Microsoft tends to use in their examples.


It appears that the guidance in this area may have changed, as StyleCop now enforces the use of the C#-specific aliases.

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367  
+1: string.Format() always looks strange to me. –  Dan Feb 11 '10 at 0:15
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I don't remember seeing that "general recommendation" anywhere, to be honest. Personally I tend to use string everywhere... –  Jon Skeet Feb 12 '12 at 16:34
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@JonSkeet, I've seen this general guideline a few places. e.g. en.csharp-online.net/CSharp_String_Theory—string_versus_String. And as I mentioned, many of Microsoft's code samples follow this style. It's defintely not universally agreed-upon, though. –  Derek Park Feb 12 '12 at 18:00
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If you decide to use StyleCop and follow that, that will say to use the types specific to the language. So for C# you'll have string (instead of String), int (instead of Int32), float (instead of Single) - stylecop.soyuz5.com/SA1121.html –  Dominic Zukiewicz May 22 '12 at 22:36
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String.Format() actually looks really odd to me. I never understood why people use the alias one place and the class name in another. Be consistent. –  cdhowie Oct 2 '12 at 22:47

Just for the sake of completeness, here's a brain dump of related information...

As others have noted, string is an alias for System.String. They compile to the same code, so at execution time there is no difference whatsoever. This is just one of the aliases in C#. The complete list is:

object:  System.Object
string:  System.String
bool:    System.Boolean
byte:    System.Byte
sbyte:   System.SByte
short:   System.Int16
ushort:  System.UInt16
int:     System.Int32
uint:    System.UInt32
long:    System.Int64
ulong:   System.UInt64
float:   System.Single
double:  System.Double
decimal: System.Decimal
char:    System.Char

Apart from string, object, the aliases are all to value types. decimal is a value type, but not a primitive type in the CLR. The only primitive type which doesn't have an alias is System.IntPtr.

In the spec, the value type aliases are known as "simple types". Literals can be used for constant values of every simple type; no other value types have literal forms available. (Compare this with VB, which allows DateTime literals, and has an alias for it too.)

There is one circumstance in which you have to use the aliases: when explicitly specifying an enum's underlying type. For instance:

public enum Foo : UInt32 {} // Invalid
public enum Bar : uint   {} // Valid

Finally, when it comes to which to use: personally I use the aliases everywhere for the implementation, but the CLR type for any APIs. It really doesn't matter too much which you use in terms of implementation - consistency among your team is nice, but no-one else is going to care. On the other hand, it's genuinely important that if you refer to a type in an API, you do so in a language neutral way. A method called ReadInt32 is unambiguous, whereas a method called ReadInt requires interpretation. The caller could be using a language which defines an int alias for Int16, for example. The .NET framework designers have followed this pattern, good examples being in the BitConverter, BinaryReader and Convert classes.

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19  
The inheritance situation with enum is interesting. Can you point to documentation onto why alias must be used for enumerations? Or is this a known bug? –  JaredPar Oct 19 '08 at 2:00
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It's in section 14.1 of the spec (I can't quote here easily as it's too long). It doesn't explicitly say that you've got to use the alias, but the aliases are sort of treated as their own types. It's all a bit weird. –  Jon Skeet Oct 19 '08 at 6:34
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@PiPeep what's more astounding than the large amount of upvotes is the staggering low amount of downvotes (consider the top 5 posts have a total of over 2000 upvotes, and yet only 1 downvote amongst them all). Especially when you factor in the notion that there's always "haters" in any community, I really find that simply incredible. –  corsiKa Sep 9 '11 at 21:27
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@JonSkeet I'm very late to the party, but sec 14.1 of C# version 4 spec does explicitly say you must use the alias: "enum-base" is defined as "integral-type", which is in turn (Appendix B, Grammar) is defined as the alias keywords. –  phoog Dec 29 '11 at 19:48
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Another even-later-to-the-party thought: If you use the BCL type name (String), the compiler has to resolve it in the context of your using statements, to see whether you indeed meant System.String or perhaps AdvancedPhysics.String or RememberToBuyButter.TieAroundFinger.String. Lower-case string, on the other hand, is a keyword, and can only ever refer to System.String. Presumably this affects the compilation time, though I doubt the difference is observable. –  phoog Aug 30 '12 at 14:24

String stands for System.String and it is a .NET Framework type. string is an alias in the C# language for System.String. Both of them are compiled to System.String in IL (Intermediate Language), so there is no difference. Choose what you like and use that. If you code in C#, I'd prefer string as it's a C# type alias and well-known by C# programmers.

I can say the same about (int, System.Int32) etc..

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The best answer I have ever heard about using the provided type aliases in C# comes from Jeffrey Richter in his book CLR Via C#. Here are his 3 reasons:

  • I've seen a number of developers confused, not knowing whether to use string or String in their code. Because in C# the string (a keyword) maps exactly to System.String (an FCL type), there is no difference and either can be used.
  • In C#, long maps to System.Int64, but in a different programming language, long could map to an Int16 or Int32. In fact, C++/CLI does in fact treat long as an Int32. Someone reading source code in one language could easily misinterpret the code's intention if he or she were used to programming in a different programming language. In fact, most languages won't even treat long as a keyword and won't compile code that uses it.
  • The FCL has many methods that have type names as part of their method names. For example, the BinaryReader type offers methods such as ReadBoolean, ReadInt32, ReadSingle, and so on, and the System.Convert type offers methods such as ToBoolean, ToInt32, ToSingle, and so on. Although it's legal to write the following code, the line with float feels very unnatural to me, and it's not obvious that the line is correct:
BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(...);
float val  = br.ReadSingle(); // Ok, but feels unnatural
Single val = br.ReadSingle(); // OK and feels good

So there you have it. I think these are all really good points. I however, don't find myself using Jeffrey's advice in my own code. Maybe I am too stuck in my C# world but I end up trying to make my code look like the framework code.

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6  
var val = br.ReadSingle();? –  dalle Jan 19 at 16:57
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"Someone reading source code in one language could easily misinterpret the code's intention if he or she were used to programming in a different programming language." - If someone is reading C# source code they should interpret long according to the language spec, not another languages spec. Both C# and JavaScript use the var keyword, but I don't treat it like-for-like in both languages, because the languages are different. –  series0ne May 29 at 13:59

string is a reserved word, but String is just a class name. This means that 'string' cannot be used as a variable name by itself.

If for some reason you wanted a variable called string, you'd see only the first of these compiles:

StringBuilder String = new StringBuilder();  // compiles
StringBuilder string = new StringBuilder();  // doesn't compile 

If you really want a variable name called 'string' you can use @ as a prefix :

StringBuilder @string = new StringBuilder();

Another critical difference : Stackoverflow highlights them differently.

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Keep in mind that calling a local @string is really rather pointless, since the names of locals are only present in PDBs. Might as well call it _string or something. It makes more sense for things that have names accessible via reflection, where the name of an @string member would be "string". –  romkyns Aug 19 '13 at 10:30

It's been covered above; however, you can't use string in reflection; you must use String.

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There IS one difference - you can't use String without using System; beforehand.

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you can if you drop a "using System;" at the top of your file. –  Kevlar Dec 19 '08 at 19:04
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by default most people do add this in any ways at the top of the file. VS does this by default in most cases of not all! –  IbrarMumtaz Apr 6 '10 at 16:10

Valters, you cannot establish global aliases in the style of string, int, etc. so far as I know. However, you can do more localized aliasing for types and namespaces with the using keyword.

e.g.

using str = System.String;
//...
str s = "Now you've got another alias for string!";

See here: using Directive (C# Reference)

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Oh please don't do this in real code. I once worked with a dev that did a similar thing in C with #defines. He basically created his own language cos he grew tired or typing "int", "char" etc. –  nashwan Jan 28 '13 at 10:43
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It can be useful for interop. For instance: using HWND = System.IntPtr; –  P Daddy Apr 23 '13 at 21:17
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Yes M.Mimpen that is correct; however I only use var if the type is obviously deductible for someone reading the code, as opposed to just knowing that the compiler will infer the type and leaving it at that. At some point in time, some poor sap is going to have to maintain yours (and my) code and I like to make it readable. After all, we've all been on the receiving end of other people's crazyness.. no need to generate more :) –  sh1rts Dec 24 '13 at 0:30

string and String are identical in all ways (except the uppercase "S"). There are no performance implications either way.

Lowercase string is preferred in most projects due to the syntax highlighting

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Richter is certainly a legend, and CLR via C# is wonderful - but that doesn't mean his opinions should be seen as ultimate truth :) (For an example, see msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2008/10/08/…) –  Jon Skeet Oct 18 '08 at 19:34
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@kirk.burleson: Not at all. I have a lot of respect for Richter - but why should that mean we have to agree with him on every point? –  Jon Skeet Sep 16 '11 at 5:24
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"string" is not the same as "String". Is means "System.String". So if you use "String" you have to put "using System" to include the namespace –  ThiagoAlves Dec 3 '11 at 16:41

System.String is THE .net string class - in C# string is an alias for System.String - so in use they are the same.

As for guidelines I wouldn't get too bogged down and just use whichever you feel like - there are more important things in life and the code is going to be the same anyway.

If you find yourselves building systems where it is necessary to specify the size of the integers you are using and so tend to use Int16, Int32, UInt16, UInt32 etc. then it might look more natural to use String - and when moving around between different .net languages it might make things more understandable - otherwise I would use string and int.

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I prefer the capitalized .NET types (rather than the aliases) for formatting reasons. The .NET types are colored the same as other object types (the value types are proper objects, after all).

Conditional and control keywords (like if, switch, and return) are lowercase and colored dark blue (by default). And I would rather not have the disagreement in use and format.

Consider:

String someString; 
string anotherString; 
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7  
This is why I always use String and not string. –  Otiel Sep 28 '11 at 15:13
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Do you also write code like: Int32 i = 1; Rather than int i = 1; ? Seems inconsistent to not use the string alias when it's availble. –  nashwan Jan 28 '13 at 10:49
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@nashwan: actually, yes, I do use Int32 i=1; intstead of int i = 1; I find the former to be more readable as to my intent: namely that I want a 32 bit signed integer. –  Chris Lively Feb 15 '13 at 17:30

string is just an alias for System.String. The compiler will treat them identically.

The only practical difference is the syntax highlighting as you mention, and that you have to write using System if you use String.

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You do have to include a using System when using String, otherwise you get the following error: The type or namespace name 'String' could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  Ronald Oct 16 '09 at 17:53

C# is a language which is used together with the CLR.

string is a type in C#.

System.String is a type in the CLR.

When you use C# together with the CLR string will be mapped to System.String.

Theoretically, you could implement a C#-compiler that generated Java bytecode. A sensible implementation of this compiler would probably map string to java.lang.String in order to interoperate with the Java runtime library.

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According to ECMA-334, section 9.4.3, "string" is a keyword. :-) I agree with you that "string" is a type if you focus on the semantics, but I'd say it's a keyword (i.e. a reserved word) if you focus on the syntax. The standard backs both points of view (perhaps too ambiguously!). To me, the OP is about syntax, so I tend to focus on syntax when I look at answers, but I see your point too. Furthermore, your answer, as it stands, may be interpreted as to mean that two different types exist: string and String, when that is not the case. One is a maping to the other. –  CesarGon Jul 31 '11 at 19:30

Both are same. But from coding guidelines perspective it's better to use string instead of String. This is what generally developers use. e.g. instead of using Int32 we use int as int is alias to Int32 FYI “The keyword string is simply an alias for the predefined class System.String.” - C# Language Specification 4.2.3 http://msdn2.microsoft.com/En-US/library/aa691153.aspx

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As the others are saying, they're the same. StyleCop rules, by default, will enforce you to use string as a C# code style best practice, except when referencing System.String static functions, such as String.Format, String.Join, String.Concat, etc...

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I wasn't aware that StyleCop would flag String use - except for static methods. I think that is great as that is how I always use it: string for type declarations and String when I access the static members. –  Goyuix May 5 '11 at 18:41

Lower case string is an alias for System.String. They are the same in C#.

There's a debate over whether you should use the System types (System.Int32, System.String, etc.) types or the C# aliases (int, string, etc). I personally believe you should use the C# aliases, but that's just my personal preference.

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Against what seems to be common practice among other programmers, I prefer String over string, just to highlight the fact that String is a reference type, as Jon Skeet mentioned.

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Using System types makes it easier to port between C# and VB.Net, if you are into that sort of thing.

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Converting between C# and VB.NET is easy enough as it is. developerfusion.com/tools/convert/vb-to-csharp –  Grant Jul 1 '11 at 20:35

‘string’ is an alias (or shorthand) of System.String. That means, by typing ‘string’ we meant System.String. You can read more in think link: 'string' is an alias/shorthand of System.String.

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String (System.String) is a class in the base class library. string (lower case) is a reserved work in C# that is an alias for System.String. Int32 vs int is a similar situation as is Boolean vs. bool. These C# language specific keywords enable you to declare primitives in a style similar to C.

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String is not a keyword and it can be used as Identifier whereas string is a keyword and cannot be used as Identifier. And in function point of view both are same.

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I'd just like to add this to lfousts answer, from Ritchers book:

The C# language specification states, “As a matter of style, use of the keyword is favored over use of the complete system type name.” I disagree with the language specification; I prefer to use the FCL type names and completely avoid the primitive type names. In fact, I wish that compilers didn’t even offer the primitive type names and forced developers to use the FCL type names instead. Here are my reasons:

I didn't get his opinion before I read the complete paragraph.

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Coming late to the party: I use the CLR types 100% of the time (well, except if forced to use the C# type, but I don't remember when the last time that was).

I originally started doing this years ago, as per the CLR books by Ritchie. It made sense to me that all CLR languages ultimately have to be able to support the set of CLR types, so using the CLR types yourself provided clearer, and possibly more "reusable" code.

Now that I've been doing it for years, it's a habit and I like the coloration that VS shows for the CLR types.

The only real downer is that auto-complete uses the C# type, so I end up re-typing automatically generated types to specify the CLR type instead.

Also, now, when I see "int" or "string", it just looks really wrong to me, like I'm looking at 1970's C code.

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There is no difference.

The C# keyword string maps to the .NET type System.String - it is an alias that keeps to the naming conventions of the language.

Similarly, int maps to System.Int32.

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It's a matter of convention, really. "string" just looks more like C/C++ style. The general convention is to use whatever shortcuts your chosen language has provided (int/Int for Int32). This goes for "object" and "decimal" as well.

Theoretically this could help to port code into some future 64-bit standard in which "int" might mean Int64, but that's not the point, and I would expect any upgrade wizard to change any "int" references to "Int32" anyway just to be safe.

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There is no difference between the two - string, however, appears to be the preferred option when considering other developers' source code.

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This youtube video demonstrates practically how they differ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikqUUIg8gmk

But now for a long textual answer.

When we talk about .NET there are two different things one there is .NET framework and the other there are languages ( C# , VB.NET etc) which use that framework.

enter image description here

"System.String" a.k.a "String" ( capital "S") is a .NET framework data type while "string" is a C# data type.

enter image description here

In short "String" is an alias ( the same thing called with different names) of "string". So technically both the below code statements will give the same output.

String s = "I am String";

or

string s = "I am String";

In the same way there are aliases for other c# data type as shown below:-

object: System.Object,string: System.String,bool: System.Boolean,byte: System.Byte,sbyte:,System.SByte,short: System.Int16 and so on

Now the million dollar question from programmer's point of view So when to use "String" and "string"?

First thing to avoid confusion use one of them consistently. But from best practices perspective when you do variable declaration it's good to use "string" ( small "s") and when you are using it as a class name then "String" ( capital "S") is preferred.

In the below code the left hand side is a variable declaration and it declared using "string". At the right hand side we are calling a method so "String" is more sensible.

string s = String.ToUpper() ;
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Yes, that's no difference between them, just like the bool and Boolean.

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One argument not mentioned elsewhere to prefer the pascal case String:

System.String is a reference type, and reference types names are pascal case by convention.

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The casing conventions don't differ between reference types and value types, as evidenced by the Int32 type you yourself mentioned. It doesn't make sense to eschew the keyword in favor of the class name to abide by some imagined restriction that reference types follow different naming conventions than value types. –  P Daddy Apr 24 '13 at 15:34

String refers to a string object which comes with various functions for manipulating the contained string.

string refers to a primitive type

In C# they both compile to String but in other languages they do not so you should use String if you want to deal with String objects and string if you want to deal with literals.

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