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Here is code sample which reproduces my problem:

template <typename myType>
class Base {
public:
    Base() {}
    virtual ~Base() {}
protected:
    int myOption;
    virtual void set() = 0;
};

template <typename InterfaceType>
class ChildClass : public Base < std::vector<InterfaceType> >
{
public:
    ChildClass() {}
    virtual ~ChildClass() {}
 protected:
    virtual void set();
};

template <typename InterfaceType>
void ChildClass<InterfaceType>::set()
{
     myOption = 10;
}

My usage in main():

ChildClass<int> myObject;

I get the following error (gcc 4.4.3 on ubuntu):

‘myOption’ was not declared in this scope

If my ChildClass would be without new template parameter this would work fine, i.e.:

class ChildClass : public Base < std::vector<SomeConcreteType> >

Edit

I've managed to solve it, if my set method looks like:

Base<std::vector<InterfaceType> >::myOption = 10;

It works fine. Still though not sure why I need to specify all template parameters.

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marked as duplicate by BЈовић Oct 20 at 15:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
myOption is a dependent name, it will work with this-> –  iammilind Aug 16 '11 at 9:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

myOption is not a dependent name, i.e. it doesn't depend on the template arguments explicitly so the compiler tries to look it up early. You must make it a dependent name:

template <typename InterfaceType>
void ChildClass<InterfaceType>::set()
{
     this->myOption = 10;
}

Now it depends on the type of this and thus on the template arguments. Therefore the compiler will bind it at the time of instantiation.

This is called Two-phase name lookup.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I knew it but still missed it. :) –  iammilind Aug 16 '11 at 9:49
    
Might require another question, but is there a way to avoid having to refer to every base class variable by this->myVar? It makes the code ugly. –  Joey Dumont Feb 28 at 17:44
    
@JoeyDumont: I can't think of any. Defining a function named myOption() returning a reference to this->myOption will shorten this (no pun intended), but IMO will be even more ugly. Besides, I don't think this-> is ugly at all. This is how you would write it in C, say. –  ybungalobill Feb 28 at 18:07
    
@ybungalobill Fair enough, but my code mostly consists of equations, so having tons of this-> makes it a little less readable. It's not that big of an issue, though, so I won't search any further. –  Joey Dumont Mar 1 at 20:37
    
It works without this in Visual Studio 2008, just myOption = 10; is OK. –  qub1n Apr 7 at 12:10

C++03 14.6.2 Dependent names

In the definition of a class template or a member of a class template, if a base class of the class template depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during unqualified name lookup either at the point of definition of the class template or member or during an instantiation of the class template or member.

The following code should work.

template <typename InterfaceType>
void ChildClass<InterfaceType>::set()
{
   Base<std::vector<InterfaceType> >::myOption = 10;
}
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4  
(Rhetorical question) Great, but why? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 9:48
    
Thanks for the reminder. I updated my answer. –  Eric Z Aug 16 '11 at 10:01
    
+1 for the quote from the standard! –  ybungalobill Aug 16 '11 at 10:03
    
@Eric: Better ;) A combination of your answer and ybungalobill's would be the perfect answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 10:03

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