Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I try do implement a user dynamic filter, where used selects some properties, selects some operators and selects also the values.

As I didn't find yet an answer to this question, I tried to use LINQ expressions.
Mainly I need to identify all houses which main rooms are kitchens(any sens, I know).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
//using System.Linq.Dynamic;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Room aRoom = new Room() { Name = "a Room" };
            Room bRoom = new Room() { Name = "b Room" };
            Room cRoom = new Room() { Name = "c Room" };

            House myHouse = new House
            {
                Rooms = new List<Room>(new Room[] { aRoom }),
                MainRoom = aRoom
            };
            House yourHouse = new House()
            {
                Rooms = new List<Room>(new Room[] { bRoom, cRoom }),
                MainRoom = bRoom
            };
            House donaldsHouse = new House()
            {
                Rooms = new List<Room>(new Room[] { aRoom, bRoom, cRoom }),
                MainRoom = aRoom
            };

            var houses = new List<House>(new House[] { myHouse, yourHouse, donaldsHouse });

            //var kitchens = houses.AsQueryable<House>().Where("MainRoom.Type = RoomType.Kitchen");
            //Console.WriteLine("kitchens count = {0}", kitchens.Count());

            var houseParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(House), "house");
            var houseMainRoomParam = Expression.Property(houseParam, "MainRoom");
            var houseMainRoomTypeParam = Expression.Property(houseMainRoomParam, "Type");

            var roomTypeParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(RoomType), "roomType");

            var comparison = Expression.Lambda(
                Expression.Equal(houseMainRoomTypeParam,
                Expression.Constant("Kitchen", typeof(RoomType)))
                );

            // ???????????????????????? DOES NOT WORK
            var kitchens = houses.AsQueryable().Where(comparison);

            Console.WriteLine("kitchens count = {0}", kitchens.Count());
            Console.ReadKey();

        }
    }

    public class House
    {
        public string Address { get; set; }
        public double Area { get; set; }
        public Room MainRoom { get; set; }
        public List<Room> Rooms { get; set; }
    }

    public class Room
    {
        public double Area { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public RoomType Type { get; set; }
    }

    public enum RoomType
    {
        Kitchen,
        Bedroom,
        Library,
        Office
    }
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
var kitchens = from h in houses
               where h.MainRoom.Type == RoomType.Kitchen
               select h;

But you must set the RoomType property on the rooms before.

Ok, edit:

so you must redefine:

var comparison = Expression.Lambda<Func<House, bool>>(...

Then, when you use it:

var kitchens = houses.AsQueryable().Where(comparison.Compile());

Edit #2:

Ok, here you go:

var roomTypeParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof(RoomType), "roomType");



// ???????????????????????? DOES NOT WORK
var comparison = Expression.Lambda<Func<House, bool>>(
    Expression.Equal(houseMainRoomTypeParam,
    Expression.Constant(Enum.Parse(typeof(RoomType), "Kitchen"), typeof(RoomType))), houseParam);



// ???????????????????????? DOES NOT WORK
var kitchens = houses.AsQueryable().Where(comparison);

Edit #3: Of, for your needs, I am out of ideas for now. I give you one last one:

Declare an extension method on the String type:

internal static object Prepare(this string value, Type type)
{
    if (type.IsEnum)
        return Enum.Parse(type, value);

    return value;
}

Then use it in that expression like:

Expression.Constant("Kitchen".Prepare(typeof(RoomType)), typeof(RoomType))

That's because apparently enums are treated differently. That extension will leave the string unaltered for other types. Drawback: you have to add another typeof() there.

share|improve this answer
    
I need a dynamic query. This query is a static one. If the user will select other property instead of "Type" of room, your method should be updated... the RoomType is Kitchen (0) by default. –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 11:15
    
good remark. Now the runtime exception is "Argument types do not match" when building the "comparison". PS. No need to "Compile" a priori... –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 11:24
    
@serhio Check if this suits you. –  Vladimir Aug 16 '11 at 12:07
    
Pasib, the solution works. I doubt, however, using it in the real project, because of unclear implementation if we deal with heterogenous and initially unknow filter (list of properties(like Name), operators(like >=) and property values( like "test"))... –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 12:35
    
errata: "RoomType.Kitchen" is not good for me. I need a string instead of a hardcoded value. –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 14:56

To add a new Enum type to dynamic Linq, you must add the following code :

typeof(Enum),
typeof(T)

T : Enum type

in predefined types of dynamic. That works for me.

share|improve this answer
    
be more clear what did you mean.. –  nawfal Apr 26 '13 at 13:53

I wouldn't build the where clause in that way - I think it's more complex than it needs to be for your needs. Instead, you can combine where clauses like this:

var houses = new List<House>(new House[] { myHouse, yourHouse, donaldsHouse });

// A basic predicate which always returns true:
Func<House, bool> housePredicate = h => 1 == 1;

// A room name which you got from user input:
string userEnteredName = "a Room";

// Add the room name predicate if appropriate:
if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(userEnteredName))
{
    housePredicate += h => h.MainRoom.Name == userEnteredName;
}

// A room type which you got from user input:
RoomType? userSelectedRoomType = RoomType.Kitchen;

// Add the room type predicate if appropriate:
if (userSelectedRoomType.HasValue)
{
    housePredicate += h => h.MainRoom.Type == userSelectedRoomType.Value;
}

// MainRoom.Name = \"a Room\" and Rooms.Count = 3 or 
// ?????????????????????????
var aRoomsHouses = houses.AsQueryable<House>().Where(housePredicate);

I tested this one, honest :)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, I will test it. To be more clear, I try to do something like here: stackoverflow.com/q/7026855/185593 –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 11:18
    
Unless you need to include user-specified ordering of results, I'd recommend using predicates like this. If you need to allow users to order results, I'd recommend dynamic linq. –  Steve Wilkes Aug 16 '11 at 11:27
    
as you can see in the GUI from the link of first comment, I can't know a priori the property(es) to apply to the filter. So variables like "userEnteredName" have no sens in my code, as far I don't deal with the property "Name", but with a initially unknown (list of) property(ies) and unknown operator(s). –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 11:42
    
I assume you know what property each piece of filter data a user posts to your page relates to - even if they're posted like "property1Name:property1Value,property2Name:property2Value" - so you should be able to parse the input to find out which properties have filters(?) Once you know that, you can apply the filters conditionally. –  Steve Wilkes Aug 16 '11 at 11:51
    
in fact from the filter grid I can obtain a list of properties, then a list of operators, and a list of values. So I need to compare the first property using the first operator to the first value, then the second property using the second operator to the second value, etc... As your code "hardcodes" the operators, si in order to use this code I will need to have 2 switches for each filer grid line (one for select case property, other for select case operator), and also a third one to link that filters (with OR or AND)... –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 12:12
// ???????????????????????? DOES NOT WORK
var kitchens = houses.AsQueryable().Where(comparison);

The Where method takes a Func<House, bool> or a Expression<Func<House, bool>> as the parameter, but the variable comparison is of type LambdaExpression, which doesn't match. You need to use another overload of the method:

var comparison = Expression.Lambda<Func<House, bool>>(
                Expression.Equal(houseMainRoomTypeParam,
                Expression.Constant("Kitchen", typeof(RoomType))));
//now the type of comparison is Expression<Func<House, bool>>

//the overload in Expression.cs
public static Expression<TDelegate> Lambda<TDelegate>(Expression body, params ParameterExpression[] parameters);
share|improve this answer
    
I already understood this from Visual Studio. Thank you. However, I don't know how to proceed. –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 11:11

what about this

var kitchens = houses
                .SelectMany(h => h.Rooms, (h, r) => new {House = h, Room = r})
                .Where(hr => hr.Room.Type == RoomType.Kitchen)
                .Select(hr => hr.House);
share|improve this answer
2  
I need a dynamic query. This query is a static one. If the user will select other property instead of "Type" of room, your method should be updated... –  serhio Aug 16 '11 at 11:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.