Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Wikipedia says:

The statement "f(x) is O(g(x))" as defined above is usually written as f(x) = O(g(x)). Some consider this to be an abuse of notation, since the use of the equals sign could be misleading as it suggests a symmetry that this statement does not have. As de Bruijn says, O(x) = O(x^2) is true but O(x^2) = O(x) is not

I understand the formal definition but not what de Bruin says. Im puzzeled by trying to understand what O(x) = O(x^2) or even O(x) is O(x^2) really means.

Intuitively I would read it as "The class of functions with complexity x is the same as the class of functions with complexity x^2". But that does not make sense.

The wikipedia talk page does not help much either.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Intuitively I would read it as "The class of functions with complexity x is the same as the class of functions with complexity x^2". But that does not make sense.

Yes, and that is why people don't like the notation with the equals sign.

It should read as "The class of functions with complexity x is included in the class of functions with complexity x^2" or "A function with a linear upper bound for complexity is also a function with a quadratic upper complexity bound" (where of course the quadratic bound is not very tight).

share|improve this answer
3  
yepp, ∈ or ⊆ would be probably better. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 16 '11 at 11:24
    
Re: ∈ or ⊆ It says as much on the Wikipedia page, too (+1 for being able to type that...) –  Thilo Aug 16 '11 at 11:26

In math, '=' is usually expected represent "equality", and should be an equivalence relation. This means it should be reflexive, symmetric and transitive.

As de Bruijn says, O(x) = O(x^2) is true but O(x^2) = O(x) is not

means the relation is not symmetric.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.