Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this code for solving Newton's method and in the last iteration, the output values have come wrong. Those values should not be negative as I checked it manually on paper. As far as I know the code is right but I cannot figure out why is it displaying negative values and also the final u value should ideally be a positive value in between 0 and 1. Here is the code:

import copy
import math

tlist = [0.0, 0.07, 0.13, 0.15, 0.2, 0.22] # list of start time for the phonemes

w = 1.0

def time() :
    t_u = 0.0
    for i in range(len(tlist)- 1) :
        t_u = t_u + 0.04 # regular time interval
        print t_u
        print tlist[i], ' ' , tlist[i+1], ' ', tlist[i -1]
        if t_u >= tlist[i] and t_u <= tlist[i + 1] :
            poly = poly_coeff(tlist[i], tlist[i + 1], t_u)
            Newton(poly) 
        else :
            poly = poly_coeff(tlist[i - 1], tlist[i], t_u)
            Newton(poly) 

def poly_coeff(start_time, end_time, t_u) :
    """The equation is k6 * u^3 + k5 * u^2 + k4 * u + k0 = 0. Computing the coefficients for this polynomial."""
    """Substituting the required values we get the coefficients."""
    t0 = start_time
    t3 = end_time
    t1 = t2 = (t0 + t3) / 2
    w0 = w1 = w2 = w3 = w
    k0 = w0 * (t_u - t0)
    k1 = w1 * (t_u - t1)
    k2 = w2 * (t_u - t2)
    k3 = w3 * (t_u - t3)
    k4 = 3 * (k1 - k0)
    k5 = 3 * (k2 - 2 * k1 + k0)
    k6 = k3 - 3 * k2 + 3 * k1 -k0 

    print k0, k1, k2, k3, k4, k5, k6
    return [[k6,3], [k5,2], [k4,1], [k0,0]]

def poly_differentiate(poly):
    """ Differentiate polynomial. """
    newlist = copy.deepcopy(poly)

    for term in newlist:
        term[0] *= term[1]
        term[1] -= 1

    return newlist

def poly_substitute(poly, x):
    """ Apply value to polynomial. """
    sum = 0.0 

    for term in poly:
        sum += term[0] * (x ** term[1])
    return sum

def Newton(poly):
    """ Returns a root of the polynomial"""
    x = 0.5  # initial guess value 
    epsilon = 0.000000000001
    poly_diff = poly_differentiate(poly) 

    while True:
        x_n = x - (float(poly_substitute(poly, x)) / float(poly_substitute(poly_diff, x)))

        if abs(x_n - x) < epsilon :
            break
        x = x_n
        print x_n
    print "u: ", x_n
    return x_n

if __name__ == "__main__" :
    time()

The output for the last iteration is the following,

where k6 = -0.02, k5 = 0.03, k4 = -0.03 and k0 = 0.0

0.2
0.2   0.22   0.15
0.0 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.03 0.03 -0.02
-0.166666666667
-0.0244444444444
-0.000587577730193
-3.45112269878e-07
-1.19102451449e-13
u: -1.42121180685e-26

The initial guess value is 0.5 so if it is substituted in the polynomial then the output is -0.005.

Then again the same initial value is substituted in the differentiated polynomial. The result of that is -0.015.

Now these values are substituted in the Newton's equation then the answer should come as 0.166666667. But the actual answer is a negative value.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
1: Can your explain poly_coeff? Where did that algorithm come from? All of the rest of your math is correct as far as I can tell, and I'm getting the answers that you've posted. 2: You say that you've checked it manually on paper - can you post those calculations, so we can see what the difference is between the expected and actual? – Nate Aug 16 '11 at 13:13
    
@Nate the poly_coeff() calculates the coefficients for a polynomial which is given in the comments. Then the root for that polynomial is calculated using Newton's method. I will edit the question showing my manual calculation. Thanks – zingy Aug 16 '11 at 13:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ah, I see now.

Just as you say,

float(poly_substitute(poly, x))

evaluates to -0.015. Then,

float(poly_substitute(poly_diff, x))

evaluates to -0.01. Thus, substituting for these values and for x,

x_n = 0.5 - ( (-0.015) / (-0.01) )
x_n = 0.5 - 0.6666666...
x_n = -0.166666...

Your manual math was what was at fault, not the code.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I found out that the code is fine. Also its python floating point issues that gave the unexpected result. Thanks – zingy Aug 16 '11 at 16:04

The polynomial as given has a single solution at x = 0. The code is working fine.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.