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I want to develop a soft keyboard for Android and already got a autocorrect algorithm which makes suggestions based on the fact if the input character and the character of a word from the dictionary are neighbours on the keyboard. This works in combination with the levenshtein-algorithm (if a character has to be replaced with a different character it is checked if they are neighbours). That's why this check is called very frequently. Currently, it consumes 50% of the time spent on autocorrection.

My current approach is a seperate trie with 3 layers. First layer: first character. Second layer: second character: Third layer: boolean holding the information if the characters are neighbours. But I'm afraid a trie is overkill? The intern hashmaps for every children may slow it down, as well? Should I build a hashmap with an own charToNumber-function?

How would you do this? Which bottlenecks can be avoided? Character.toLowerCase() seems to be inefficient as well when it's called everytime a check is performed.

I hope you can help me speeding up the task :)

share|improve this question
    
50% time in autocorrection seems to be a huge number, but it doesn't tell us how it affects the user experience. How long does it take to correct a word, and how long shall it take? – user unknown Aug 16 '11 at 14:04
1  
Currently, it's a normal java application since I want to develop the engine first (Android emulator speed would slow the development down ;)). A average "search" takes 80 ms whereas 40 ms are spent on checking if the keys are adjacant. But my Desktop PC got 4x4 GHz, so I guess the user experience on a 1 GHZ smartphone would be affected considerably, but I still have to test this ;) – Otts Aug 16 '11 at 14:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about assigning numbers to each key and use that to determine proximity.

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    double[] d = new double[26];
    d['q'-97] = 100d;
    d['w'-97] = 101d;
    d['e'-97] = 102d;
    d['r'-97] = 103d;
    d['t'-97] = 104d;
    //(optionally, put a space of 5 between right hand and left hand for each row)
    d['y'-97] = 105d;
    d['u'-97] = 106d;
    d['i'-97] = 107d;
    d['o'-97] = 108d;
    d['p'-97] = 109d;


    //my keyboard middle row is about 20% indented from first row
    d['a'-97] = 200.2;
    d['s'-97] = 201.2;
    d['d'-97] = 202.2;
    d['f'-97] = 203.2;
    d['g'-97] = 204.2;
    d['h'-97] = 205.2;
    d['j'-97] = 206.2;
    d['k'-97] = 207.2;
    d['l'-97] = 208.2;

    //third row is about 50% indented from middle row
    d['z'-97] = 300.5;
    d['x'-97] = 301.5;
    d['c'-97] = 302.5;
    d['v'-97] = 303.5;
    d['b'-97] = 304.5;
    d['n'-97] = 305.5;
    d['m'-97] = 306.5;

    for (char a = 'a'; a <= 'z'; a++) {
        for (char b = 'a'; b <= 'z'; b++)
            if (a != b && prox(a,b,d))
                System.out.println(a + " and " + b + " are prox");
    }

}

static boolean prox(char a, char b, double m) {
    double a1 = m[a-97];
    double a2 = m[b-97];

    double d = Math.abs(a1-a2);
    //TODO: add in d == 5 if there is a spacing for left and right hand gap (since it's more unlikely of a crossover)
    return d == 0 || d == 1 || (d >= 99 && d <= 101);
}

Partial Output:

a and q are prox
a and s are prox
a and w are prox
a and z are prox
....
g and b are prox
g and f are prox
g and h are prox
g and t are prox
g and v are prox
g and y are prox   
....
y and g are prox
y and h are prox
y and t are prox
y and u are prox 
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice idea! But unfortunately it's slower than a raw switch-block respectively than the bitset-version. But nevertheless: Thank you for you interesting suggestion! – Otts Aug 16 '11 at 21:56
    
Thanks, it can be optimized and be much closer to the BitSet speed if the code is adjusted from using a Map object to a double[] array. I have edited the example to show. Very interesting question! – scott Aug 16 '11 at 23:46
    
Ok, now I'm shocked. Luckily, I tried your new version. It took 469 ms for 1 000 000 runs. Bitset took 1752 ms which was also a major improvement in comparison to my 24 408-ms-trie but your version rocks it. Thank you very much! – Otts Aug 17 '11 at 12:32
    
I multiplicated every value by 10 and changed the variable type to short. Memory improvement is probably very small but the speed improvement measures another 23 %! – Otts Aug 17 '11 at 12:58
    
Nice improvement! – scott Aug 17 '11 at 13:06

You just want to determine whether two characters are next to each other on the keyboard? Why not use a map from a character to a set of adjacent characters? When using efficient data structures you will get O(1) time - use array for a map (continuous key space - ASCII codes of keys) and BitSet for a set of adjacent keys. Also very compact.

Here is a sample code:

BitSet[] adjacentKeys = new BitSet[127];

//initialize
adjacentKeys[(int) 'q'] = new BitSet(127);
adjacentKeys[(int) 'q'].set((int)'a');
adjacentKeys[(int) 'q'].set((int)'w');
adjacentKeys[(int) 'q'].set((int)'s');
//...

//usage
adjacentKeys[(int) 'q'].get((int) 'a');     //q close to a yields true
adjacentKeys[(int) 'q'].get((int) 'e');     //q close to e yields false

This should be very efficient, no loops and complicated computations like hashCodes. Of course you have to initialize the table manually, I would advice doing this once at application startup from som external configuration file.

BTW neat idea!

share|improve this answer
    
And the winner is...!! :D I tried your version and ran every character-combination 1 000 000 times. Your code took 1752 ms. The Raw switch-block 3596 ms. The proximity approach by scott 7254 ms and my origin trie-approach unbelievable 24 408 ms! So, thank you very much, Thomas :) – Otts Aug 16 '11 at 21:53
    
Ok, the new version by scott is even better. The speed differences are very interesting. But nevertheless: Thanks, Thomas! – Otts Aug 17 '11 at 12:34

I really like the idea.

For raw speed, you would use a massive switch statement. The code would be large, but there would be nothing faster:

public static boolean isNeighbour(char key1, char key2) {
    switch (key1) {
    case 'a':
        return key2 == 'w' || key2 == 'e' || key2 == 'd' || key2 == 'x' || key2 == 'z';
    case 'd':
        return key2 == 's' || key2 == 'w' || key2 == 'f' || key2 == 'c' || key2 == 'x';
    // etc
    default:
        return false;
    }
}


Here's a "standard" way to do it that should still perform well:

private static final Map<Character, List<Character>> neighbours =
    new HashMap<Character, List<Character>>() {{
    put('s', Arrays.asList('a', 'w', 'e', 'd', 'x', 'z')); 
    put('d', Arrays.asList('s', 'e', 'w', 'f', 'c', 'x'));
    // etc
}};

public static boolean isNeighbour(char key1, char key2) {
    List<Character> list = neighbours.get(key1);
    return list != null && list.contains(key2);
}

This algorithm does not make use of the fact that if a isneighbour b then b isneighbour a, but rather sacrifices data size for code simplicity.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure about that but I suspect BitSet will be faster than raw list. However since there will never be more than few keys in each adjacency list, HashSet isn't probably the most effective and compact for this problem. – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Aug 16 '11 at 14:15
    
First, I had a huge if-structure which wasn't that fast but I just adapted your switch-approach (coding-work was done by the program itself) and the speed is twice as fast as my previous trie-approach. Thanks for that! But I'm going to try the BitSet/HashSet-suggestion as well. Thanks for all your quick answers! – Otts Aug 16 '11 at 14:33

Here is my hungarian version (if somebody needs it):

 public static boolean isHungarianNeighbour(int key1, int key2) {
    switch (key1) {
        case 'q':
            return key2 == 'w' || key2 == 's' || key2 == 'a' || key2 == '1' || key2 == '2';
        case 'w':
            return key2 == 'q' || key2 == '2' || key2 == '3' || key2 == 'e' || key2 == 's' || key2 == 'a';
        case 'e':
            return key2 == '3' || key2 == '4' || key2 == 'w' || key2 == 'r' || key2 == 's' || key2 == 'd';
        case 'r':
            return key2 == '4' || key2 == '5' || key2 == 'e' || key2 == 't' || key2 == 'd'|| key2 == 'f';
        case 't':
            return key2 == '5' || key2 == '6' || key2 == 'r' || key2 == 'z' || key2 == 'f' || key2 == 'g';
        case 'z':
            return key2 == '6' || key2 == '7' || key2 == 't' || key2 == 'u' || key2 == 'g' || key2 == 'h';
        case 'u':
            return key2 == '7' || key2 == '8' || key2 == 'z' || key2 == 'i' || key2 == 'h' || key2 == 'j';
        case 'i':
            return key2 == '8' || key2 == '9' || key2 == 'u' || key2 == 'o' || key2 == 'j' || key2 == 'k';
        case 'o':
            return key2 == '9' || key2 == 'ö' || key2 == 'i' || key2 == 'p' || key2 == 'k' || key2 == 'l';
        case 'p':
            return key2 == 'ö' || key2 == 'ü' || key2 == 'o' || key2 == 'ő' || key2 == 'l' || key2 == 'é';
        case 'ő':
            return key2 == 'ü' || key2 == 'ó' || key2 == 'p' || key2 == 'ú' || key2 == 'é' || key2 == 'á';
        case 'ú':
            return key2 == 'ó' || key2 == 'ő' || key2 == 'á' || key2 == 'ű';
        case 'a':
            return key2 == 'q' || key2 == 'w' || key2 == 's' || key2 == 'y' || key2 == 'í';
        case 's':
            return key2 == 'w' || key2 == 'e' || key2 == 'a' || key2 == 'd' || key2 == 'y' || key2 == 'x';
        case 'd':
            return key2 == 'e' || key2 == 'r' || key2 == 's' || key2 == 'f' || key2 == 'x' || key2 == 'c';
        case 'f':
            return key2 == 'r' || key2 == 't' || key2 == 'd' || key2 == 'g' || key2 == 'c' || key2 == 'v';
        case 'g':
            return key2 == 't' || key2 == 'z' || key2 == 'f' || key2 == 'h' || key2 == 'v' || key2 == 'b';
        case 'h':
            return key2 == 'z' || key2 == 'u' || key2 == 'g' || key2 == 'j' || key2 == 'b' || key2 == 'n';
        case 'j':
            return key2 == 'u' || key2 == 'i' || key2 == 'h' || key2 == 'k' || key2 == 'n' || key2 == 'm';
        case 'k':
            return key2 == 'i' || key2 == 'o' || key2 == 'j' || key2 == 'l' || key2 == 'm';
        case 'l':
            return key2 == 'o' || key2 == 'p' || key2 == 'k' || key2 == 'é';
        case 'é':
            return key2 == 'p' || key2 == 'ő' || key2 == 'l' || key2 == 'á';
        case 'á':
            return key2 == 'ő' || key2 == 'ú' || key2 == 'é' || key2 == 'ű';
        case 'ű':
            return key2 == 'á' || key2 == 'ú';
        case 'í':
            return key2 == 'a' || key2 == 'y';
        case 'y':
            return key2 == 'a' || key2 == 's' || key2 == 'í' || key2 == 'x';
        case 'x':
            return key2 == 's' || key2 == 'd' || key2 == 'y' || key2 == 'c';
        case 'c':
            return key2 == 'd' || key2 == 'f' || key2 == 'x' || key2 == 'v';
        case 'v':
            return key2 == 'f' || key2 == 'g' || key2 == 'c' || key2 == 'b';
        case 'b':
            return key2 == 'g' || key2 == 'h' || key2 == 'v' || key2 == 'n';
        case 'n':
            return key2 == 'h' || key2 == 'j' || key2 == 'b' || key2 == 'm';
        case 'm':
            return key2 == 'j' || key2 == 'k' || key2 == 'n' || key2 == '?';
        default:
            return false;
    }
}
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