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Imagine you have a rating like

Rating = OneStar | TwoStars | ThreeStars | FourStars | FiveStars

What is the best way to instanciate/implement "Ord" for such an algebraic data type in Haskell?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The best way would be to just add deriving (Eq, Ord) to the type's definition.

Since you listed your constructors in ascending order, the derived Ord instance will give you exactly the order you want.

However, if changing the order in the definition is not an option for some reason you can still derive Eq, since for that the order does not matter. Given an instance of Eq, we can manually write an instance for Ord. The most succinct way to define compare would probably be to spell out all the combinations for which compare should return LT and then simply use compare x y | x == y = Eq; compare _ _ = GT for the remaining combinations.

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Thanks, i did not know that the order is preserved. –  LennyStackOverflow Aug 16 '11 at 14:24
    
Bonus question: what if the order in the definiton would not reflect the numerical order? –  LennyStackOverflow Aug 16 '11 at 14:31
2  
@Lenny: Then you'd have instantiate Ord and define compare by hand (assuming that changing the order in the definition is not an option for some reason) - you can still derive Eq though since for that the order does not matter. The most succinct way to define compare would probably be to spell out all the combinations for which compare should return LT and then simply use compare x y | x == y = Eq; compare _ _ = GT for the remaining combinations. –  sepp2k Aug 16 '11 at 14:41
2  
@Lenny easier solution: change the definition so it is in ascending order! –  Dan Burton Aug 16 '11 at 16:50
1  
@Lenny for some protocol work I even added unused placeholders: data x = Val0 | Val1 | Val2 | Unused3 | Unused4 | Val5. Silly, is just sometimes the fastest and easiest way to go (but not if you have large gaps, obviously). –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Aug 16 '11 at 20:48

As has been mention, you can derive Eq and Ord. Or you could derive Enum and then do

instance Eq Rating where
    x == y = fromEnum x == fromEnum y

Or just spell it all out

instance Eq Rating where
    OneStar == OneStar = True
    TwoStar == TwoStar = True
...
    _ == _ = False
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