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I need a base class like TInterfacedObject but without reference counting (so a kind of TNonRefCountedInterfacedObject).

This actually is the nth time I need such a class and somehow I always end up writing (read: copy and pasting) my own again and again. I cannot believe that there is no "official" base class I can use.

Is there a base class somewhere in the RTL implementing IInterface but without reference counting which I can derive my classes from?

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I know that TComponent does disable reference counting, but you probably don't want to carry all the stuff in TComponent around. I don't know of any predefined class, I wrote my own one. –  jpfollenius Aug 16 '11 at 14:54
    
@Smasher: I was tempted to use TComponent but then decided to first ask the question ;) I'd like to use a small, dedicated class. –  Heinrich Ulbricht Aug 16 '11 at 15:07
    
Thanks for all your input, it was fun considering all your different implementations! I like the addition of a name for debugging, TInterfacedPersistent was still too heavy for my taste, I nearly used TPureInterfacedObject (I like the name!) but then @Erwin stepped in and showed me the pure native implementation! Although I don't like the name TSingletonImplementation. –  Heinrich Ulbricht Aug 16 '11 at 17:10
1  
For perfectionism, the name is really annoying. I'd create a type alias TNonRefCountedInterfacedObject = TSingletonImplementation in order not to confuse myself. –  stanleyxu2005 Jun 12 at 15:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the unit Generics.Defaults there is a class TSingletonImplementation defined. Available in Delphi 2009 and above.

  // A non-reference-counted IInterface implementation.
  TSingletonImplementation = class(TObject, IInterface)
  protected
    function QueryInterface(const IID: TGUID; out Obj): HResult; stdcall;
    function _AddRef: Integer; stdcall;
    function _Release: Integer; stdcall;
  end;
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4  
+1 what an unfortunate name though... –  jpfollenius Aug 16 '11 at 20:00

I don't know of any out-of-the-box base class, so I wrote my own (like you). Just put it in a common utils unit and you are done.

type
  TPureInterfacedObject = class(TObject, IInterface)
  protected
    { IInterface }
    function QueryInterface(const IID: TGUID; out Obj): HResult; virtual; stdcall;
    function _AddRef: Integer; stdcall;
    function _Release: Integer; stdcall;
  end;

{ TPureInterfacedObject }

function TPureInterfacedObject.QueryInterface(const IID: TGUID; out Obj): HResult;
begin
  Result := E_NOINTERFACE;
end;

function TPureInterfacedObject._AddRef: Integer;
begin
  Result := -1;
end;

function TPureInterfacedObject._Release: Integer;
begin
  Result := -1;
end;
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1  
Why implement QueryInterface in such a limiting way. –  David Heffernan Aug 17 '11 at 10:51
    
I had no use for implementing it otherwise. But maybe I'll copy the implementation from TInterfacedPersistent.QueryInterface for the sake of completeness. –  Uli Gerhardt Aug 17 '11 at 11:13

I did this. It can be used in place of TInterfacedObject with or without reference counting. It also has a name property - very useful when debugging.

// TArtInterfacedObject
// =============================================================================


// An object that supports interfaces, allowing naming and optional reference counting
type
  TArtInterfacedObject = class( TInterfacedObject )
    constructor Create( AReferenceCounted : boolean = True);
  PRIVATE
    FName             : string;
    FReferenceCounted : boolean;
  PROTECTED
    procedure SetName( const AName : string ); virtual;
  PUBLIC

    property Name : string
               read FName
               write SetName;

    function QueryInterface(const AGUID : TGUID; out Obj): HResult; stdcall;
    function SupportsInterface( const AGUID : TGUID ) : boolean;
    function _AddRef: Integer; stdcall;
    function _Release: Integer; stdcall;

  end;

// =============================================================================




{ TArtInterfacedObject }

constructor TArtInterfacedObject.Create( AReferenceCounted : boolean = True);
begin
  inherited Create;

  FName := '';

  FReferenceCounted := AReferenceCounted;
end;

function TArtInterfacedObject.QueryInterface(const AGUID: TGUID; out Obj): HResult;
const
  E_NOINTERFACE = HResult($80004002);
begin
  If FReferenceCounted then
    Result := inherited QueryInterface( AGUID, Obj )
   else
    if GetInterface(AGUID, Obj) then Result := 0 else Result := E_NOINTERFACE;
end;


procedure TArtInterfacedObject.SetName(const AName: string);
begin
  FName := AName;
end;

function TArtInterfacedObject.SupportsInterface(
  const AGUID: TGUID): boolean;
var
  P : TObject;
begin
  Result := QueryInterface( AGUID, P ) = S_OK;
end;


function TArtInterfacedObject._AddRef: Integer;
begin
  If FReferenceCounted then
    Result := inherited _AddRef
   else
    Result := -1   // -1 indicates no reference counting is taking place
end;

function TArtInterfacedObject._Release: Integer;
begin
  If FReferenceCounted then
    Result := inherited _Release
   else
    Result := -1   // -1 indicates no reference counting is taking place
end;


// =============================================================================
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1  
I wanted to berate you for not using the predefined E_NOINTERFACE. But I just noticed that the VCL defines it four times, so you're a minor offender. :-P –  Uli Gerhardt Aug 16 '11 at 15:16
    
what is the point of the behaviour switching in QueryInterface? Seems needless to me. –  David Heffernan Aug 17 '11 at 10:48

You might consider TInterfacedPersistent. If you don't override GetOwner it does no ref-counting.

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There is no such class, but you can easily write your own, as others have shown. I do, however, wonder why you would need it. In my experience, there is seldom a real need for such a class, even if you want to mix object and interface references.

Also note that when you use such a class, you'll still have to take care of setting any interface references you have to such an object to nil before they leave scope and before you free the object. Otherwise you might get the situation the runtime tries to call _Release on a freed object, and that tends to cause an invalid pointer exception.

IOW, I would advise against using such a class at all.

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Your warning is much appreciated, the risk is definitely there. I also usually advocate using either objects or interfaces, but not both on the same objects. But there are cases where it solves certain problems... –  Heinrich Ulbricht Aug 16 '11 at 17:22
    
One can use both at the same time, no problem. One must just be aware of the refcount issues, i.e. one must not free the interfaced object. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 16 '11 at 18:20

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