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Assuming I have a table like the one below:

create table filetype_filestatus (
  id             integer(11) not null auto_increment,
  file_type_id   integer(11) not null,
  file_status_id integer(11) not null,
)

I want to add a sequence column like so:

alter table filetype_filestatus add column sequence integer(11) not null;
alter table filetype_filestatus add unique key idx1 (file_type_id, file_status_id, sequence);

Now I want to add the column, which is straightforward, and populate it with some default values that satisfy the unique key.

The sequence column is to allow the user to arbitrarily order the display of file_status for a particular file_type. I'm not too concerned by the initial order since that can be revised in the application.

Ideally I would end up with something like:

FileType FileStatus Sequence
   1        1          1
   1        2          2
   1        3          3
   2        2          1
   2        2          2

The best I can think of is something like:

update filetype_filestatus set sequence = file_type_id * 1000 + file_status_id;

Are there better approaches?

share|improve this question
    
I'm kind of confused by your question. It sounds like you're saying that the inital value of Sequence doesn't really matter. So why not just set it to 1? –  jadarnel27 Aug 16 '11 at 15:10
    
Drop the unique key? That should solve your problems. Even if there were more than 1 record with the same file_type_id, file_status_id and sequence - what can go wrong in the retrieval of the data? –  N.B. Aug 16 '11 at 15:12
    
All of the above comments are true. I was trying to enforce some db constraints that match what the application developer will present to the user. That is a screen for each file type with the file statuses order by the displayed sequence column number 1..n. I don't want to order them all by hand but I would like the displayed sequence column to match what the application will write out to the DB. –  hairyone Aug 16 '11 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Hmm, I believe this should work:

UPDATE filetype_filestatus as a 
       SET sequence = (SELECT COALESCE(MAX(b.sequence), 0)  
                       FROM filetype_filestatus as b
                       WHERE b.file_type_id = a.file_type_id) + 1

WHERE sequence = 0

I'd recommend adding the new column to the table, running the alter table statement (and getting the default of 0), run the update statement, then add the constraint (well, you have to anyways). Anything that gets touched updates to a sequence greater than 0, so this can be safely run multiple times, too.


EDIT:

As @Dems has pointed out, the subquery is being run before the update, and so the above doesn't actually work for this purpose. It does work on single-line inserts (which doesn't help at all here).


EDIT:

Gah, you have an id column, this works just fine (and yes, I tested this one first).

UPDATE filetype_filestatus as a
       SET sequence = (SELECT COALESCE(COUNT(*), 0)
                       FROM filetype_filestatus as b
                       WHERE b.file_type_id = a.file_type_id
                       AND b.id < a.id) + 1
WHERE sequence = 0

Don't know about the performance implications, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure it would work? I would not expect the results of the update to propegate into the correlated-sub-query within the same update. Not to mention the lack of guaranteed order in which rows would be updated. –  MatBailie Aug 16 '11 at 16:01
    
Gnn, you're right, it sets them all to the same thing (namely, 1). Hmmm... Oh, and the initial order didn't appear to matter, so I didn't care about it. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 16 '11 at 16:15
    
@X-Zero I tried the latter statemnt in MySQL and I got "You can't specify target table 'a' for update in FROM clause". However replacing "FROM filetype_filestatus as b" with "FROM (SELECT * FROM filetype_filestatus) as b" does (see: xaprb.com/blog/2006/06/23/…) –  hairyone Aug 16 '11 at 17:16
    
@Dems answer also works but I favoured this one because it achieved the my idealised outcome in one update statement statement. –  hairyone Aug 16 '11 at 17:25

If all you need are "some values that conform to idx1", why not just copy the id field? It is, after all, unique...

UPDATE
  filetype_filestatus
SET
  sequence = id;

EDIT

How to get sequential values based on the OPs changes to the question being asked.

ROW_NUMBER() is not available in MySQL, and it is also my understanding that you can't use the table being updated in the source query as well.

create temporary table temp_filetype_filestatus (
  id             integer(11) not null auto_increment,
  file_type_id   integer(11) not null,
  file_status_id integer(11) not null,
  PRIMARY KEY (file_type_id, file_status_id)
)

INSERT INTO temp_filetype_filestatus (
  file_type_id,
  file_status_id
)
SELECT
  file_type_id,
  file_status_id
FROM
  filetype_filestatus
ORDER BY
  file_type_id,
  file_status_id

-- Update Option 1
------------------
UPDATE
  filetype_filestatus
SET
  sequence
  =
  (SELECT id FROM temp_filetype_filestatus
   WHERE file_type_id   = filetype_filestatus.file_type_id
     AND file_status_id = filetype_filestatus.file_status_id)
  -
  (SELECT id FROM temp_filetype_filestatus
   WHERE file_type_id   = filetype_filestatus.file_type_id
   ORDER BY file_status_id ASC LIMIT 1)
  +
  1

-- Update Option 2
------------------
UPDATE
  filetype_filestatus
SET
  sequence
  =
  (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM temp_filetype_filestatus
   WHERE file_type_id    = filetype_filestatus.file_type_id
     AND file_status_id <= filetype_filestatus.file_status_id)
share|improve this answer
    
See my comment above. This would work and in fact is a simpler approach than my solution.However, I would like to be able to achieve the 1..n for sequence within a group of filetype. –  hairyone Aug 16 '11 at 15:59
    
There is, but it's slow as hell, I'll update the answer now... –  MatBailie Aug 16 '11 at 16:02

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