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I'm trying to use pointers to member variables in a polymorphic fashion.

This works:

struct Foo
{
   int member0;
   int member1;

   int* getMember( int i )
   {
     static int Foo::* table[2] = { &Foo::member0, &Foo::member1 };
     return &( this->*table[i] );
   }
};

This does not, since the members are not of the same type (BaseClass):

struct Foo
{
   SubClassA member0;
   SubClassB member1;

   BaseClass* getMember( int i )
   {
     static BaseClass Foo::* table[2] = { &Foo::member0, &Foo::member1 };
     return &( this->*table[i] );
   }
};

The error reported by g++ is:

[...] invalid conversion from 'SubClassA Foo::*' to 'BaseClass Foo::*'
[...] invalid conversion from 'SubClassB Foo::*' to 'BaseClass Foo::*'

Is there a way to make this work, ie to "upcast" the member pointer to its base class?

share|improve this question
1  
The form of the question is really bad. What is wrong with your code, right now? Any error? Post more info what you want to do, and what problem you're facing. –  Nawaz Aug 16 '11 at 16:31
    
@Nawaz Yeah, I almost attempted to answer this question but couldn't tell what he wanted to do or what was wrong. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 16 '11 at 16:36
    
I added the error message and some clarification. –  hmn Aug 16 '11 at 16:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is not possible. Because of multiple inheritance, address-of-base is not always the same as address-of-derived. You need some hidden address adjustment magic to convert one to the other, and a pointer-to-member, being a very simple object (basically an integer offset) cannot accomodate this magic.

It is true that address adjustment only needed sometimes, and when it is not needed, polymorphic pointers-to-members could in principle be allowed. But this is not done, for simplicity and consistency.

Instead of pointers-to-members, you can use pointers to functions (or function-like objects) that accept a Foo* and return a BaseClass*. You will have to make a separate function for each member though.

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It seems that I can hack this by using a C cast (BaseClass Foo::*) &Foo::member0. I can assert that no multiple inheritance is used in these member types... but I will probably switch to using arrays of BaseClass pointers instead. –  hmn Aug 16 '11 at 20:44
BaseClass* getMember(const int i)
{
  switch(i)
  {
  case 0: return &member0;
  case 1: return &member1;
  default: throw <exception>;
  }
}

For robustness you have to anyway check if the i is within the range or 0 and 1; so you can think for this simplified approach.

share|improve this answer

The easier way to do it would be to skip the member data pointers altogether.

getMember(int i) {
    BaseClass* ptr[2] = { &member0, &member1 };
    return ptr[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would be easier, but also slower? My reason for doing it with the static pointers is to minimize the lookup time... –  hmn Aug 16 '11 at 16:34
1  
@hmn: I would love to see the assembly for that small function you might be surprised by what the compiler generates... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 16 '11 at 16:43
    
That function is only small when the number of members is small ;-) –  hmn Aug 16 '11 at 16:56
    
Such a difference is the height of triviality, if it even exists at all. –  Puppy Aug 16 '11 at 17:56
    
How is this trivial? This is O(1) vs O(n) per call... –  hmn Aug 16 '11 at 18:29

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