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Would it be a good idea for me to learn something what dynamic variables actually mean and how they help to make my windows Vista ?

I have heard that

int* g=new int[50];

is supposed to dynamically allocate memory for an array of 50 integers. And g is called a dynamic variable too. If so, what are dynamic variables in my windows ? I think this is more of a concept than of some computable objects to define. And I am in the middle of nowhere between both.

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First part is correct, g is pointing to dynamically allocated memory. But g is not a dynamic variable, there is no such thing in C++. I have no idea what you mean by 'variables in my windows'. –  john Aug 16 '11 at 16:44
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It would benefit you to get a good introductory C++ book. –  James McNellis Aug 16 '11 at 16:47
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@Andrejs: C doesn't even have new, so... no. And tutorials should always be eschewed in favour of a good, recommended book. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 16:51
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"and how they help to make my windows Vista " eh? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 16:51
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@Andrejs: I could not disagree more. C++ is a distinct language to C, with its own conventions and idioms. Any good C++ book will teach you all you need to know: there is no reason to poison your mind with conventions and idioms from C -- a different language -- just to pick up the common subset of concepts. And there's absolutely no reason to encourage that in programming newcomers, either. The answer to "should I learn C before C++?" is a firm no! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 17:03
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1 Answer 1

You should definitely read a good book, but I'll give you some brief answers here anyway.

Would it be a good idea for me to learn something what dynamic variables actually mean?

Yes.

I have heard that

int* g=new int[50];

is supposed to dynamically allocate memory for an array of 50 integers.

That's right.

And g is called a dynamic variable too.

There may be people who use this terminology, but I haven't heard it and I wouldn't adopt it.

g itself is not dynamic at all. It's a pointer, with automatic storage duration ("on the stack" in colloquial language). It has no particularly magic properties.

The "dynamic object" here is the array of fifty integers. This object has no name, and you can only access it through the pointer g (or through another pointer with the same value as g).

If so, what are dynamic variables in my windows ? I think this is more of a concept than of some computable objects to define. And I am in the middle of nowhere between both.

And I don't understand this part of the question at all.

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Thank you Tomalak, This object has no name, and you can only access it through the pointer g (or through another pointer with the same value as g). I would like to understand what does the *name* you mention mean. Is a dynamic object supposed to include also a name ? I would like to apply the definition dynamic variables or objects (as you said) into something I see more common, that is why I would like to know in my Windows (Vista), what are dynamically created ? –  Real Bite of Life Aug 16 '11 at 17:14
    
Like the pointer object has a name g, which comes from the name of a variable that represents it. I suppose actually the dynamically-allocated object does have a name, which comes from the dereference expression *g. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 17:16
    
If you're asking about the details of the Windows Vista codebase, including which variables they dynamically allocate, then that is heavily specific, heavily proprietary, and completely useless to know. What are you really trying to find out here? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 17:16
    
Thank you, I would like to know some examples of dynamic objects in real life applications, and I choose Windows as the most common one people all play with. –  Real Bite of Life Aug 16 '11 at 17:38
    
@Real: You're better off taking a far smaller project to case study. Windows is huge. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 16 '11 at 17:49
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