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Initially I had the following.

struct A: public B
{                 
};

typedef struct A C;

Now, I changed that into

typedef struct: public B
{                 
} C;

and I get a link error for all functions getting

fun(C*)

as a parameter.

How can I fix this problem?

share|improve this question
3  
Why not simply say struct C : public B {};? Also in C++ structs don't live in separate namespace. – user786653 Aug 16 '11 at 17:39
4  
Removed the C tag. Inheritance is involved. Therefore the question has nothing to do with C – Armen Tsirunyan Aug 16 '11 at 17:43
1  
What linker error do you get? – jirkamat Aug 16 '11 at 17:44
2  
What's the error you get exactly? Also, I compiled your code and it worked fine. See ideone.com/rIXwD You'll have to show where you call fun. – Seth Carnegie Aug 16 '11 at 17:45
    
This works for me. So please be clear about what problem you are facing. – Alok Save Aug 16 '11 at 17:46

I'm not totally sure, but a couple ideas: You can't forward declare typedefs, so if someone was forward declaring A that could cause issues (even if it seems unrelated).

I suspect the real problem is because you're typedefing the struct instead of naming it. Almost certainly this is causing the compiler to give it different linkage (for example it gets different decorated name in each file) and it can't find the appropriate functions.

Finally, since you're using inheritance this must be C++, so you probably shouldn't be using typedef for your structs at all.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue was that i am typedefing a struct without naming it on C++. thanks – sramij Nov 18 '11 at 16:33

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