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I have a base class that has an API that returns a DataTable based on identifiers, And I need to have an object for each identifier.

I hate to work with datatables, so I wanted to write a mapping code, that I only have to map the properties to the specific fields in the datatable.

Is there any faster way to do it rather than my exmaple?

Thanks.

public abstract class BaseClass<T> where T : BaseClass<T>
{
    protected abstract T MapObject(DataRow row);

    protected abstract int SomeIdentifier { get; }

    public IList<T> GetData()
    {
        return ConvertDataTableToGenericList(GetDataTableFromOtherSource(this.SomeIdentifier));
    }

    private IList<T> ConvertDataTableToGenericList(DataTable table)
    {
        IList<T> objectList = new List<T>();
        foreach (DataRow row in table.Rows)
        {
            objectList.Add(MapObject(row));
        }
        return objectList;
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass<DerivedClass>
{
    public int ID { get; set; }

    protected override int SomeIdentifier
    {
        get { return 1; }
    }

    protected override DerivedClass MapObject(DataRow row)
    {
        return new DerivedClass()
        {
            ID = (int)row["ID"]
        };
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
There is no apparent bottlenecks. However, since you know the RowCount of the table, you can construct your list with that starting capacity. That will save you some reallocations in the list, if the number of items is large (this is real micro-micro optimization, I wouldn't expect notable performance difference). – driis Aug 16 '11 at 18:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could change your interface to work with IEnumerable<T> and yield return the results. The overall performance wouldn't increase but you could start faster to process the result.

As a sample:

private IEnumerable<T> ConvertDataTableToGenericList(DataTable table)
{
    foreach (DataRow row in table.Rows)
    {
        yield return MapObject(row);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This does what you want, maybe not as readable? But very concise. I'm not a LINQ expert, so maybe this can be cleaned up. Also, not sure why you'd want to do this though...

//using System.Dynamic; <-- put this at the top

Linq<dynamic> list = (from r in table.AsEnumerable()
  let eo = new ExpandoObject()
  let blah = (dt.Columns.Cast<DataColumn>().All(dc => { ((IDictionary<string,object>eo).Add(dc.ColumnName, r[dc]); return true; }))
  select eo).Cast<dynamic>().ToList();

Console.WriteLine(list[0].ID); //your first ID of your DataTable.

What do you think?

share|improve this answer
    
I am not a LINQ expert also, and I didn't quite understand what you did here... – Amir Aug 18 '11 at 18:26

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