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I have a simple code that seems to be giving strange results.

var startPoint:Point = new Point(x, y); // a point
var r:Number = path[i].row + (-Math.floor((length * 2 + 2) / 2)); // just some math
trace(r); // the math checks out and gives a 3
var tey = startPoint.y + r; //this gives a really strange return....
trace(startPoint.y + r, tey); // this works, and then gives the strange return.

the return is

3
10 7function Function() {}

as

var tey:Number = startPoint.y + r;
trace(startPoint.y + r, tey);

the return is

10 NaN

IDE is FlashDevelop if you feel that information is important.

Additional Info/Testing:

trace(startPoint.y);

traces as

7

:Number

var tey:Number = startPoint.y + r;
trace(tey);

equals

NaN

Number()

var tey = Number(startPoint.y) + r;
trace(tey);

equals

7function Function() {}

(excuse my poor post layout, I'm still inexperienced with stackoverflow's editing system and am working on making this a little cleaner)

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Have you tried tracing startPoint.y? NaN is returned when you try adding a number to something that is not a number. –  a paid nerd Aug 16 '11 at 18:54
    
it returns a 7, i shall add it to the post. The trace works for everything I could think of, i tested and fiddled for a while. It only doesn't work when I try to add them together in the 'tey' variable preemptively. –  SimpleRookie Aug 16 '11 at 18:57
    
It doesn't seem that startPoint.y is the problem, it seems that r is evaluating to function Function() {}, but obviously only in that context. Which is incredibly strange. –  Sam DeHaan Aug 16 '11 at 19:11
    
Hard to debug further without seeing assignments of x,y,i,path[],length, contents of path[i].row –  Sam DeHaan Aug 16 '11 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

I can not reproduce your issue. Your problem is with the X and Y values on this line, probably more so the Y value.

var startPoint:Point = new Point(x, y); // a point

Try hard coding the X and Y to 0

Here is some sample code I ran. This worked as expected, so I will assume its the vars X and Y or something related to the "i" when you access path[i].row

var startPoint:Point = new Point(0, 0); // a point
var r:Number = 3; // just some math
trace(r); // the math checks out and gives a 3
var tey = startPoint.y + r; //this gives a really strange return....
trace(startPoint.y + r, tey); // this works, and then gives the strange return.
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I discovered the issue, it was with a part of the code that I appended out of my sample above.

var startPoint:Point = new Point(x, y); // a point
for ( /*for stuff*/ ){
    var r:Number = path[i].row + (-Math.floor((length * 2 + 2) / 2)); // just some math
}
trace(r); // the math checks out and gives a 3
var tey = startPoint.y + r; //this gives a really strange return....
trace(startPoint.y + r, tey); // this works, and then gives the strange return.

being var'd inside of the for loop made it act oddly when used outside so I had to move the var assignment outside of the loop and use as normal. A strange occurrence, but I should have knew better.

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