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Right now, users can edit some their attributes without having to enter their password because my validations are set up like this:

validates :password, :presence =>true, :confirmation => true, :length => { :within => 6..40 }, :on => :create
validates :password, :confirmation => true, :length => { :within => 6..40 }, :on => :update, :unless => lambda{ |user| user.password.blank? } 

However, after a user does this, their password is deleted - update_attributes is updating their password to "". Here is my update definition:

def update

    if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
        flash[:success] = "Edit Successful."
        redirect_to @user
    else
        @title = "Edit user"
        render 'edit'
    end
end

I've also tried using a different definition that uses update_attribute instead:

def save_ff
    @user = User.find(params[:id])
    @user.update_attribute(:course1, params[:user][:course1] )
    @user.update_attribute(:course2, params[:user][:course2] )
    @user.update_attribute(:course3, params[:user][:course3] )
    @user.update_attribute(:course4, params[:user][:course4] )
    redirect_to @user 
end 

But for some reason this is doing the same thing. How can I update some user attributes without changing the password? Thanks!

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8 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I didn't realize the solution I gave you yesterday would lead to this problem. Sorry.

Well, taking inspiration from devise, you should simply update your controller this way:

def update
  params[:user].delete(:password) if params[:user][:password].blank?
  if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
    flash[:success] = "Edit Successful."
    redirect_to @user
  else
    @title = "Edit user"
    render 'edit'
  end
end
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Oh now that's very clever. This way you can use the same update action and split the update forms for the user over many views, you just need to remember to delete an attribute if it's blank. –  Starkers Apr 6 at 16:30
    
-1 are better explained... –  apneadiving Apr 7 at 7:26
    
Ah I feel bad now. But this answer didn't work for me as of Rails 4, because we now use strong params over the params hash itself, so this answer wouldn't work for a beginner who was copy-pasting. The concept is still sound though so maybe it doesn't grant a thumb-down. If you edit your answer with strong params I'll be able to upvote. –  Starkers Apr 7 at 11:31
    
this was posted in 2011.... lets do a null edit if you want to undo... Or feel free to blame everyone posting answers prior to strong params –  apneadiving Apr 7 at 11:34
2  
I wont update answers I wrote years ago for your comfort sake. My answer was right, many are or were. I'm the biggest contributors on Rails with more than 1.5k answers, do you think I can manage them? Would you pay me for this? A question has value in its context so does the answer. Sorry you cant undersatdn it –  apneadiving Apr 7 at 12:08
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This blog post demonstrates the principal of what you want to do.

What is not shown, but may be helpful, is to add accessors to the model:

attr_accessor   :new_password, :new_password_confirmation
attr_accessible :email, :new_password, :new_password_confirmation

and to provide all of the desired validation under the condition that the user has provided a new password.

  validates :new_password,  :presence => true, 
                            :length   => { :within => 6..40 }, 
                            :confirmation => true, 
                            :if       => :password_changed?

Lastly, I would add a check to see if the encrypted_password has been set in order to determine if "password_changed?" in order to require a password on a new record.

  def password_changed?
    !@new_password.blank? or encrypted_password.blank?
  end
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love this way! +1 –  Marco Sero Sep 13 '12 at 15:08
1  
Devise is using similar approach –  Amit Patel Jan 7 '13 at 10:07
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I had the same problem, and the solutions above didn't work for me. I found the real culprit in my case: I had an encrypt_password callback in my User model, which was setting the password to blank each time.

before_save :encrypt_password

I fixed it by adding a condition at the end for this call back:

before_save :encrypt_password, :unless => Proc.new { |u| u.password.blank? }

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Does this create any security vulnerabilities? I guess I also have a validates :password which should handle it, but I don't know enough about rails to know whether not encrypting the password could create any problems. –  LikeMaBell Feb 13 '12 at 3:08
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I've been struggling with this and going around in circles for a while, so I thought I'd put my Rails 4 solution here.

None of the answers I've seen so far meet my use case, they all seem to involve bypassing validation in some way, but I want to be able to validate the other fields and also the password (if present). Also I'm not using devise on my project so i can't make use of anything particular to that.

Worth pointing out that it's a 2 part problem:

Step 1 - you need to remove the password and confirmation field from the strong parameters if the password is blank like so in your controller:

if myparams[:password].blank?
  myparams.delete(:password)
  myparams.delete(:password_confirmation)
end

Step 2 - you need to alter validation such that the password isn't validated if it's not entered. What we don't want is for it to be set to blank, hence why we removed it from our parameters earlier.

In my case this means having this as the validation in my model:

validates :password, :presence => true, :confirmation => true, length: {minimum: 7}, :if => :password

Note the :if => :password - skip checking if the password is not being set.

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# It smells

def update
  if params[:user][:password].blank?
    params[:user].delete :password
    params[:user].delete :password_confirmation
  end

  if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
    flash[:success] = "Edit Successful."
    redirect_to @user
  else
    @title = "Edit user"
    render 'edit'
  end
end

# Refactoring

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...
  def update_attributes(params)
    if params[:password].blank?
      params.delete :password
      params.delete :password_confirmation
      super params
    end
  end
  ...
end

def update
  if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
    flash[:success] = "Edit Successful."
    redirect_to @user
  else
    @title = "Edit user"
    render 'edit'
  end
end

# And little better

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...
  def custom_update_attributes(params)
    if params[:password].blank?
      params.delete :password
      params.delete :password_confirmation
      update_attributes params
    end
  end
  ...
end

def update
  if @user.custom_update_attributes(params[:user])
    flash[:success] = "Edit Successful."
    redirect_to @user
  else
    @title = "Edit user"
    render 'edit'
  end
end
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I was having the same problem. I wasn't able to fix it with

params[:user].delete(:password) if params[:user][:password].blank?

I have only been able to get it to work by doing "update_attribute" on each item individually, e.g.

if (  @user.update_attribute(:name, params[:user][:name])     && 
      @user.update_attribute(:email, params[:user][:email])   &&
      @user.update_attribute(:avatar, params[:user][:avatar]) &&
      @user.update_attribute(:age, params[:user][:age])       && 
      @user.update_attribute(:location, params[:user][:location]) &&
      @user.update_attribute(:gender, params[:user][:gender]) && 
      @user.update_attribute(:blurb, params[:user][:blurb])   )        
    flash[:success] = "Edit Successful."
    redirect_to @user
else
  @title = "Edit user info"
  render 'edit'
end

which is clearly a total hack but its the only way I can figure it out without messing with the validations and deleting the password!

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@user.username=params[:username]
if @user.update_attribute(:email,params[:email])

  flash[:notice]="successful"
else
  flash[:notice]="fail"
end

above code can update username and email field. because update_attribute can update dirty fields. but it is a pity, update_attribute would skip validation.

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The correct answer no-longer works for rails 4. I believe my answer is the cleanest and the most versatile that will work whenever you want to leave out any attributes (not just the password). This approach will be needed if you want to update the separate attributes of model in a number of different places.

For example, if you want to do what Stack Overflow does and have the passwords updatable via a security page, the profile image updatable via the user show view and the bulk of a user's information updatable via a user edit view.

1) Extend the hash class with a class method to delete blank values. We will use this method to remove blank values that are not being updated but are still present in the params hash:

1a) Create a hash.rb file in your lib directory, under an ext directory:

command line

$ mkdir lib/ext
$ touch lib/ext/hash.rb 

1b) Inside hash.rb, 'create' a Hash class and create a .delete_blanks! method:

lib/ext/hash.rb

class Hash
    def delete_blanks!
        delete_if { |k, v| v.nil? }
    end
end

1c) Require this file (and your entire lib directory) into the rails referencing it in an initializer:

config/boot.rb

# other things such as gemfiles are required here, left out for brevity

Dir['lib/**/*.rb'].each { |f| load(f) } # requires all .rb files in the lib directory 

2) Inside the users#update action, implement our shiny new delete_blanks! class method to remove the attributes we're not updating from the params hash. Then, update the user instance via the update_attributes method, *not the update method!

2a) Firstly, let's use the delete_blanks! method to fix our user_params hash:

app/controllers/users_controller.rb

user_params.delete_blanks!

2b) And now let's update the instance using the update_attributes method, over the update method:

app/controllers/users_controller.rb

@user.update_attributes(user_params)

Here's how the finished users#update action should look:

app/controllers/users_controller.rb

def update

    user_params.delete_blanks!

    respond_to do |format|
      if @user.update_attributes(user_params)
        format.html { redirect_to @user, notice: 'User was successfully updated.' }
        format.json { head :no_content }
      else
        format.html { render action: 'edit' }
        format.json { render json: @user.errors, status: :unprocessable_entity }
      end
    end
end

3) In the User model, add the if: :<attribute> option to all of your validations. This is to make sure the validation is only triggered if the attribute is present in the params hash. Our delete_blanks! method will have removed the attribute from the params hash, so the validation for password, for example, won't be run. It's also worth noting that delete_blanks! only removes hash entries with a value of nil, not blank. So if someone leaves out the password on the user create form (or any form with a field for the password), a presence validation will take effect:

3a) Use the if: option on all validations:

app/models/user.rb

VALID_EMAIL_REGEX = /[a-zA-Z0-9_.+-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9-]+\.[a-zA-Z0-9\-.]/

validates :first_name, presence: true, if: :first_name
validates :last_name, presence: true, if: :last_name
validates :user_name, presence: true, if: :user_name

validates :email, presence: true, 
                  uniqueness: { case_sensitive: false },
                  format: { with: VALID_EMAIL_REGEX }, if: :email 

validates :password, length: { minimum: 6, maximum: 10 }, if: :password

And that's it. Now the user model can be updated over many, many different forms all over your app. Presence validations for an attribute still come into play on any form that contains a field for it, e.g. the password presence validation still would come into play in the user#create view.

This may seem more verbose than other answers, but I believe this is the most robust way. You can update in isolation an infinite number of attributes for User instances, on an infinite amount of different models. Just remember when you want to do this with a new model you need to repeat the steps 2a), 2b) and 3a)

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