Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to execute the following code and am receiving an error

    public List<Log> GetLoggingData(DateTime LogDate, string title)
    {
            var context = new LoggingEntities();
            var query = from t in context.Logs

                      where t.Title == title 
                      && t.Timestamp == LogDate

                      select t;
        return query.ToList();
    }

The error I'm receiving is "The specified type member 'Date' is not supported in LINQ to Entities. Only initializers, entity members, and entity navigation properties are supported." I have tried various attempts of casting everythign to a string, only comparing the date part, but can't seem to get the right combinaation. Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
Show us the Logs class and the table it's being mapped to. –  BennyM Aug 16 '11 at 19:35
    
I am using EFv1 with .net 3.5. The log class is just a log table from the enterprise library with the title as a String type and Timestamp as a datetime field. I just want to compare the datepart –  mikemurf22 Aug 16 '11 at 19:41

6 Answers 6

If you upgrade to .NET Framework 4+ you can use EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(), then you will have something like this:

var query = from t in context.Logs
                  where t.Title == title 
                  && EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(t.Timestamp) == LogDate.Date
                  select t;
share|improve this answer
    
You will also have to Truncate your LogDate.Date property –  invalidusername Dec 31 '12 at 20:47
1  
@invalidusername LogDate is a DateTime which means that LogDate.Date is "truncated" –  Henrik Stenbæk Jan 9 '13 at 5:26
2  
+1 for you sir. I couldn't use the accepted answer in my case as I did a 'greater than' comparison, in which you can't compare on Day, Month and Year separately. –  Action Hank Feb 26 '13 at 15:33
2  
Didn't know about the functions. Fantastic. –  James Jun 7 '13 at 9:51
4  
BTW -- That function is now obsolete and has been moved to another assembly. Use 'DbFunctions.TruncateTime(t.Timestamp)' instead. –  Bob Jan 23 at 15:57
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Not the greatest solution, but it works. For a variety of reasons, I have to use .net 3.5 at this point and modifying the database would be difficult. Anyways, here is a solution that works:

            var query = from t in context.Logs
                      where t.Title == title 
                      && t.Timestamp.Day == LogDate.Day
                      && t.Timestamp.Month == LogDate.Month
                      && t.Timestamp.Year == LogDate.Year
                      select t;

Not the most elegant solution, but it is effective.

share|improve this answer

Correct me if I'm wrong, but in mikemurf22's example, it would need to check each part of the date component, and potentially a lot more server processing?

Anyway, I stumbled across this problem, and this is my solution.

Assuming that you're going to be passing in the date component only, you can find the last minute of the day that you pass in, and use the where clause to define the range.

public List<Log> GetLoggingData(DateTime LogDate, string title)
{
    DateTime enddate = new DateTime(LogDate.Year, LogDate.Month, LogDate.Day, 23, 59, 59)

    var query = from t in context.Logs
                where t.Timestamp >= date
                where t.Timestamp <= enddate
                select t;

    return query.ToList();
}
share|improve this answer

Always use EntityFunctions.TruncateTime() for both x.DateTimeStart and LogDate. such as :

var query = from t in context.Logs
              where t.Title == title 
              && EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(t.Timestamp) == EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(LogDate)
              select t;
share|improve this answer

Convert LogDate to .ToShortDateString and then you can use

> EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(t.Timestamp) == LogDate
like mike did
share|improve this answer

You can use this hack:

DateTime startDate = LogDate.Date;
DateTime endDate = LogDate.Date.AddDays(1);

var query = from t in context.Logs
            where t.Title == title 
                  && t.Timestamp >= startDate 
                  && t.Timestamp < endDate
            select t;
share|improve this answer
    
I corrected it a little. Of cource you can't use AddDays method inside your query. But you can move it outside. So workaround still works. –  algreat Mar 26 at 14:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.