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I want to do a script of the sort:

#!/usr/bin/ksh93    
typeset -A foo

function fillItUP {
    typeset -A newarr
    newarr["this"]="bar"
    newarr["another"]="tut"

    inputarrayname=$1

    nameref $inputarrayname=newarr
}

With an output of the sort:

fillItUP "foo"
echo ${foo["this"]}
bar

I guess its pretty obvious, but what I thought of doing was using a double indirect reference to manipulate the array inside the function and later use it outside. Didn't work :(

Anyone would know a way to achieve this?

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Hi, Could you provide an example of what you mean by double indirect reference. add it as an EDIT in the question itself. –  tomkaith13 Aug 23 '11 at 17:33
    
Well, that would be already there, just maybe it isnt the correct term (sorry, couldn't think of anything better). The idea is when I receive "foo" as a parameter, and try to change it to point to the variable I created inside the function. I said double indirect, because I'm trying change the "pointer" inside the function (which I had the first indirect reference received as a parameter when called). Did I manage to explain or messed it up worse :( –  filippo Aug 23 '11 at 20:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks for the explanation . I understand what you are trying to pull off.

Now here is the working code

#!/usr/bin/ksh93
typeset -A foo
foo["this"]="old bar"
foo["another"]="old tut"

function fillItUP {
    nameref newarr=$1
    newarr["this"]="bar"
    newarr["another"]="tut"
    ## nameref newarr=$1


}
fillItUP foo
echo ${foo["this"]}

The whole idea of nameref of typeset -n is to feed a variable from the one scope to the other. In your sample code, you were first allocating a local array to your function fillItUP (NOTE: why local ?? Read this on ...typeset and scope ) and then trying to point the local array to foo. If you want to change foo.. you need to make the local variable point to foo and then change it.

If you uncomment the 'commented nameref' and comment the 'uncommented nameref' You will see that the value of foo is still "old bar". If you execute the code I have added as it is, you will see that the value if foo[this]=bar and not the "old bar"

Hope this helped.

NOTE: You can comment out the initial "old" contents of foo and try it too :)

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