Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an interface that defines a method for returning an IList<PropertyInfo> :

public interface IWriteable
{
    IList<PropertyInfo> WriteableProperties();
}

.
.
It is implemented in various (dissimilar) classes in the following manner:

public abstract class Foo
{
    private IList<PropertyInfo> _props;

    protected Foo()
    {
        this._props = new List<PropertyInfo>();

        foreach (PropertyInfo p in this.GetType().GetProperties())
        {
            if (Attribute.IsDefined(p, typeof(WriteableAttribute)))
                this._props.Add(p);
        }
    }

    #region IWriteable Members

    public IList<PropertyInfo> WriteableProperties()
    {
        return this._props;
    }

    #endregion
}

public class Bar : Foo
{
    public string A
    {
        get { return "A"; }
    }

    [Writeable()]
    public string B
    {
        get { return "B"; }
    }

    [Writeable()]
    public string C
    {
        get { return "C"; }
    }

    // Snip
}

Please note the attributes marking a couple of the properties, as these are the properties that will get added to the list. This IList will then be used elsewhere during some file write operations.

It is important to me that they are ordered in the list in the order they appear in the code file.

However, MSDN states:

The GetProperties method does not return properties in a particular order, such as alphabetical or declaration order. Your code must not depend on the order in which properties are returned, because that order varies.

So, what is the best way to ensure each PropertyInfo gets added in the order I would like to to be?

(I am also using .NET2.0, so I can't use any Linq goodness, should there be any that would help, although it would be interesting to see.)

share|improve this question
2  
What are you doing where order matters? –  Anthony Pegram Aug 16 '11 at 20:01
    
The file that is created needs to be in a certain format for 3rd parties. –  Andy Aug 16 '11 at 20:06
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Add information to the attribute about the ordering, you can then use this to ensure the ordering, e.g.:

[Writeable(Order = 1)]

So for the following attribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class WriteableAttribute : Attribute
{
    public int Order { get; set; }
}

You can get an ordered selection of the properties as follows:

private readonly List<PropertyInfo> _props;

protected Foo()
{
    _props = new List<PropertyInfo>();

    var props = new Dictionary<int, PropertyInfo>();

    foreach (PropertyInfo p in GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        if (Attribute.IsDefined(p, typeof(WriteableAttribute)))
        {
            var attr = (WriteableAttribute)p
                .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(WriteableAttribute))[0];

            props.Add(attr.Order, p);
        }
    }

    _props.AddRange(props.OrderBy(kvp => kvp.Key).Select(kvp => kvp.Value));
}

NB For production code I would recommend caching the property information (per type for example) as this will be relatively slow if carried out for each instance.

Update - Caching

With some example caching of property lookup and ordering:

public static class PropertyReflector
{
    private static readonly object SyncObj = new object();

    private static readonly Dictionary<Type, List<PropertyInfo>> PropLookup =
        new Dictionary<Type, List<PropertyInfo>>();

    public static IList<PropertyInfo> GetWritableProperties(Type type)
    {
        lock (SyncObj)
        {
            List<PropertyInfo> props;

            if (!PropLookup.TryGetValue(type, out props))
            {
                var propsOrder = new Dictionary<int, PropertyInfo>();

                foreach (PropertyInfo p in type.GetProperties())
                {
                    if (Attribute.IsDefined(p, typeof(WriteableAttribute)))
                    {
                        var attr = (WriteableAttribute)p.GetCustomAttributes(
                            typeof(WriteableAttribute), inherit: true)[0];

                        propsOrder.Add(attr.Order, p);
                    }
                }

                props = new List<PropertyInfo>(propsOrder
                    .OrderBy(kvp => kvp.Key)
                    .Select(kvp => kvp.Value));

                PropLookup.Add(type, props);
            }

            return props;
        }
    }
}

Update - No Linq

You can replace the Linq section with the following code to order the properties and add them to the cache:

List<int> order = new List<int>(propsOrder.Keys);
order.Sort();

props = new List<PropertyInfo>();

order.ForEach(i => props.Add(propsOrder[i]));

PropLookup.Add(type, props);

Update - Full Linq

And using a fully Linq solution:

static IList<PropertyInfo> GetWritableProperties(Type type)
{
    lock (SyncObj)
    {
        List<PropertyInfo> props;

        if (!PropLookup.TryGetValue(type, out props))
        {
            props = type.GetProperties()
                .Select(p => new { p, Atts = p.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(WriteableAttribute), inherit: true) })
                .Where(p => p.Atts.Length != 0)
                .OrderBy(p => ((WriteableAttribute)p.Atts[0]).Order)
                .Select(p => p.p)
                .ToList();

            PropLookup.Add(type, props);
        }

        return props;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for exactly same responce was going to write. –  Tigran Aug 16 '11 at 20:06
    
@chibacity: Good answer, thanks. Although as I am using .NET2.0, I can't use the .Select extension method so would have to rework that. Also, what do you mean by caching the property info? It's already cached in the private List isn't it, or do you mean something else? –  Andy Aug 16 '11 at 21:03
    
@Andy: Yeah it uses a little Linq, just needs converting to loops. I have added an example with some simple caching. Sorry for the formatting, not very much width on SO! :) –  Tim Lloyd Aug 16 '11 at 21:16
    
@Andy In my example the proprty info will be cached for each class type, rather than for every instance you create. Much more efficient. –  Tim Lloyd Aug 16 '11 at 21:38
    
@Andy I have refactored the example code into a utility class so you are not forced into an inheritance hierarchy to get the behaviour you want. I have also included Linq and Non-Liq examples. –  Tim Lloyd Aug 17 '11 at 9:24
show 1 more comment

A while ago when I had the same problem I wrote a helper class to sort the properties based on the Order property of the attribute. I used the built-in DisplayAttribute but you can just add an Order property to any attribute you write.

class FieldSorter : IComparer, IComparer<DisplayAttribute>, IEqualityComparer<DisplayAttribute>
{
    public int Compare(object x, object y)
    {
        return Compare((DisplayAttribute)x, (DisplayAttribute)y);
    }
    public int Compare(DisplayAttribute x, DisplayAttribute y)
    {
        return x.Order.CompareTo(y.Order);
    }
    public bool Equals(DisplayAttribute x, DisplayAttribute y)
    {
        return Compare(x, y) == 0;
    }
    public int GetHashCode(DisplayAttribute obj)
    {
        return obj.GetHashCode();
    }

    public static SortedList<DisplayAttribute, PropertyInfo> GetSortedFields(Type type)
    {
        PropertyInfo[] props = type.GetProperties();
        var sortedProps = new SortedList<DisplayAttribute, PropertyInfo>(props.Length, new FieldSorter());
        object[] atts;
        int assignedOrder = 1000; // anything without pre-assigned order gets a ridiculously high order value. same for duplicates.
        foreach (var prop in props)
        {
            atts = prop.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DisplayAttribute), true);
            if (atts.Length > 0)
            {
                var att = (DisplayAttribute)atts[0];
                if (!att.GetOrder().HasValue || sortedProps.Keys.Contains(att, new FieldSorter()))
                    att.Order = assignedOrder++;
                sortedProps.Add(att, prop);
            }
        }
        return sortedProps;
    }
}

This gives you a SortedList where the key is the attribute and the value is the PropertyInfo. This was because I still needed to access other properties of the attribute.

Example usage:

        public class Stats 
        {
            [Display(Name = "Changes", Description = "Changed records.", Order = 8)]
            public int RecordsWithChanges { get; set; }
            [Display(Name = "Invalid", Description = "Number of invalid records analyzed.", Order = 4)]
            public int InvalidRecordCount { get; set; }
            [Display(Name = "Valid", Description = "Number of valid records.", Order = 6)]
            public int ValidRecordCount { get; set; }
            [Display(Name = "Cost", Description = "Number of records with a Cost value.", Order = 10)]
            public int RecordsWithCost { get; set; }
            public Stats(int changed, int valid, int invalid, int cost)
            {
                RecordsWithChanges = changed;
                ValidRecordCount = valid;
                InvalidRecordCount = invalid;
                RecordsWithCost = cost;
            }
        }

        class Program
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                var foo = new Stats(123, 456, 7, 89);
                var fields = FieldSorter.GetSortedFields(foo.GetType());
                foreach (DisplayAttribute att in fields.Keys)
                    Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1} ({2}) == {3}", 
                        att.Order, att.Name, att.Description, fields[att].GetValue(foo, null));
null));

            }
        }

Output:

4: Invalid (Number of invalid records analyzed.) -- 7
6: Valid (Number of valid records.) -- 456
8: Changes (Changed records.) -- 123
10: Cost (Number of records with a Cost value.) -- 89
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.