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I am working with images that have multiple layer which are described in their meta data that looks like this..

print layers
Cube1[visible:true, mode:Normal]{r:Cube1.R, g:Cube1.G, b:Cube1.B, a:Cube1.A}, Ground[visible:true, mode:Lighten, opacity:186]{r:Ground.R, g:Ground.G, b:Ground.B, a:Ground.A}, Cube3[visible:true, mode:Normal]{r:Cube3.R, g:Cube3.G, b:Cube3.B, a:Cube3.A}

I'm wondering if this formatting could be recognizable by Python as more then a string. Ideally I would like to call up the properties of any one for the layers. For example:

print layers[0].mode

"Normal"

On another post someone showed me how to get the names of each layer, which was very helpful, but now I'm looking to use the other info. PS: if it helps I don't care about any of the info inside the {} Thanks

print type(layers)
<type 'str'>"
share|improve this question
    
I would suggest just parsing the line. –  Jakob Bowyer Aug 16 '11 at 20:09
    
layers is not a string i guess. If so then use apropriate method to get required info. –  Artsiom Rudzenka Aug 16 '11 at 20:14
2  
    
Find out with print type(layers) If it is a string, it will be easy to parse with regular expressions. –  dpitch40 Aug 16 '11 at 20:25
    
I would note that your print layer[0] command is on layer not layers this may be part of your problem. It looks like layers is an object of some type, probably a wrapper for the cube objects. It would help if you told us what framework or library this was from. –  Spencer Rathbun Aug 16 '11 at 20:25

2 Answers 2

In case you don't want to deal with regex ...

layers = "Cube1[visible:true, mode:Normal]{r:Cube1.R, g:Cube1.G, b:Cube1.B, a:Cube1.A}, Ground[visible:true, mode:Lighten, opacity:186]{r:Ground.R, g:Ground.G, b:Ground.B, a:Ground.A}, Cube3[visible:true, mode:Normal]{r:Cube3.R, g:Cube3.G, b:Cube3.B, a:Cube3.A}"


layer_dict = {}

parts = layers.split('}')
for part in parts:
    part = part.strip(', ')

    name_end = part.find('[')
    if name_end < 1:
        continue
    name = part[:name_end]
    attrs_end = part.find(']')
    attrs = part[name_end+1:attrs_end].split(', ')
    layer_dict[name] = {}
    for attr in attrs:
        attr_parts = attr.split(':')
        layer_dict[name][attr_parts[0]] = attr_parts[1]        


print 'Cube1 ... mode:', layer_dict.get('Cube1').get('mode')
print 'Ground ... opacity:', layer_dict.get('Ground').get('opacity')
print 'Cube3', layer_dict.get('Cube3') 

output ...

Cube1 ... mode: Normal

Ground ... opacity: 186

Cube3 {'visible': 'true', 'mode': 'Normal'}

share|improve this answer

Parsing (Pyparsing et al) is surely the correct and extensible way to go, but here's a fast-and-dirty object and constructors using regexes and comprehensions to parse properties and bolt them on with setattr(). All constructive criticisms welcome!

import re
#import string

class Layer(object):
    @classmethod
    def make_list_from_string(cls,s):
        all_layers_params = re.findall(r'(\w+)\[([^\]]+)\]',s)
        return [cls(lname,largs) for (lname, largs) in all_layers_params]        
    def __init__(self,name,args):
        self.name = name
        for (larg,lval) in re.findall(r'(\w+):(\w+)(?:,\w*)?', args):
            setattr(self,larg,lval)                
    def __str__(self):
        return self.name + '[' + ','.join('%s:%s' % (k,v) for k,v in self.__dict__.iteritems() if k!='name') + ']'
    def __repr__(self):
        return self.__str__()

t = 'Cube1[visible:true, mode:Normal]{r:Cube1.R, g:Cube1.G, b:Cube1.B, a:Cube1.A}, Ground[visible:true, mode:Lighten, opacity:186]{r:Ground.R, g:Ground.G, b:Ground.B, a:Ground.A}, Cube3[visible:true, mode:Normal]{r:Cube3.R, g:Cube3.G, b:Cube3.B, a:Cube3.A}'
layers = Layer.make_list_from_string(t)

I moved all the imperative code into __init__() or the classmethod Layers.make_list_from_string(). Currently it stores all args as string, it doesn't figure opacity is int/float, but that's just an extra try...except block.

Hey, it does the job you wanted. And as a bonus it throws in mutability:

print layers[0].mode
'Normal'
print layers[1].opacity
'186'
print layers[2]
Cube3[visible:true,mode:Normal]
layers[0].mode = 'Weird'
print layers[0].mode
'Weird'

"I'm wondering if this formatting could be recognizable by Python as more then a string."

Alternatively, I was thinking if you tweaked the format a little, eval()/exec() could be used, but that's yukkier, slower and a security risk.

share|improve this answer
    
Fwiw, Python doesn't require classes to have explicit constructors; you don't need to supply the empty __init__ function for Layer. –  Wallacoloo Aug 16 '11 at 23:09
    
__init__() is no longer empty, I moved the regex parsing inside it. –  smci Aug 16 '11 at 23:09
    
Awesome! thanks so much that was really helpful! –  lacrossj Aug 17 '11 at 1:04
    
@lacrossj, if it answered your question, don't forget to click accept. –  smci Aug 17 '11 at 7:06

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