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I have a table with data like so:

[ID, Name]
1, Bob
1, Joe
1, Joe
1, Bob

I want to retrieve a list of records showing the relationship between the records with the same ID. For instance, I want the following result set from my query:

Bob, Joe
Joe, Bob
Bob, Bob
Joe, Joe

This shows me the "from" and "to" for every item in the table.

I can get this result by using the following query:

SELECT DISTINCT [NAME] 
FROM TABLE A
INNER JOIN TABLE B ON A.ID = B.ID

Is there anyway for me to achieve the same result set without the use of the "distinct" in the select statement? If I don't include the distinct, I get back 16 records, not 4.

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Any particular reason why DISTINCT should not be used? –  Matthew Jones Aug 16 '11 at 20:25
    
This is a problem I am having with a much larger query that takes over 2.5 minutes to run. I'm trying to get rid of the outer level distinct on that query in hopes it will improve performance and this is just a simple illustration of the concept. –  Amanda Myer Aug 16 '11 at 20:27
2  
Just so we are clear, can you post the schema/sample data for Table A/B mentioned in your query? –  Matthew Jones Aug 16 '11 at 20:35
    
Well, for the example here, the schema and example data is exactly as I posted above. Two columns, one called ID, the other called "Name", with the data as shown above. –  Amanda Myer Aug 16 '11 at 20:49
    
Right, but to me it looks like you are either joining the table to itself or you have two tables with (for this example) the same schema, and I just wanted to see which it was. –  Matthew Jones Aug 16 '11 at 20:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason you get duplicate rows without DISTINCT is because every row of ID = x will be joined with every other row with ID = x. Since the original table has (1, "Bob") twice, both of those will be joined to every row in the other table with ID = 1.

Removing duplicates before doing a join will do two things: decrease the time to run the query, and prevent duplicate rows from showing up in the result.

Something like (using MySQL version of SQL):

SELECT L.NAME, R.NAME
FROM (SELECT DISTINCT ID, NAME FROM A) AS L
INNER JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT ID, NAME FROM B) AS R
ON L.ID = R.ID

Edit: is B an alias for table A?

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I was able to use this to achieve a small performance improvement. Thanks. –  Amanda Myer Aug 17 '11 at 16:51

Have you tried using a group by clause?

select name
from table a
inner join table b
on a.id=b.id
group by name

That should get you the same thing as your distinct query above. As for the result set that you want, a simple self join should do it:

select name1,name2
from(
  select id,name as name1
  from table
  group by 1,2
  )a
join(
  select id,name as name2
  from table
  group by 1,2
  )b
using(id)
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In SQL and MY SQL

SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM TABLE_NAME group by COLUMN_NAME
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