Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a little confused in regards to the scope of things in regards to jQuery and Ajax.

Script start:

 $(document).ready(function () {
        var page = 'index';
        displayContent(page)
});

displayContent contains the ajax call to fetch the text content and shove it into the '#textCotnent' div.

If within the function I alert($('#textContent').text()), it alerts the text fine.

function displayContent(page) {
        $.ajax(//ajax stuff goes here and works fine);
        alert($('#textContent').text()) //alerts the text, hooray.
}

However, if I do the following:

$(document).ready(function () {
        var page = 'index';
        displayContent(page)
        alert($('#textContent').text()); //alerts a blank box, boo.
});

the text is displayed per the ajax call, but the alert pops up null.

I would assume that $('#textContent') would be fine no matter where you called it in the script, but this appears not to be the case.

What don't I understand about jQuery?

share|improve this question
1  
Are you sure you did not put alert($('#textContent').text()) inside the Ajax callback when you put it inside displayContent? Most likely it is not a jQuery problem, but you are calling the alert before the response returns. –  Felix Kling Aug 16 '11 at 23:46
    
I'll double check. But my question remains the same. Why would it matter? –  Tom Thorogood Aug 16 '11 at 23:47
    
I think jQuery/javascript execute asynchronously so in order to have the behavior you desire, you must use a callback. –  Evan Layman Aug 16 '11 at 23:48
    
See my edited comment and the answers... ;) If you did not put it in the callback (as it seems to be in your first snippet) you should have the same problems as in the second one. –  Felix Kling Aug 16 '11 at 23:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The ajax call is being done asynchronously. You have to wait until a callback function from $.ajax in order to manipulate / access the DOM from the call. I'm surprised the original structure is working. You should use the following structure:

 function displayContent(page) {
   $.ajax(/* ajax parameters */).complete(function() {
     alert($('#textContent').text()) //alerts the text, hooray.
   });
 }

Think of it this way: $.ajax function is returning immediate (in 2-3 ms) and code continues to run. The hit to your server takes ~100ms. Thus, you are jumping the gun and need to wait until the ajax completes before playing around with the results. Does this make sense?

share|improve this answer
    
or add success:functionName or success:function() { ... } to your ajax params. api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax –  Jackson Aug 17 '11 at 1:42
    
gHayes - This makes sense, and I see what you're saying. I didn't know about the .complete() method. I think I know now how to restructure my script so that it has the expected behaviour. Jackson - I had the alert() in the success param before. That is why it was working there, but not in the global call, I think. –  Tom Thorogood Aug 17 '11 at 1:45

Ajax calls are asynchronous (most of the time), thus, the alert happens right after the ajax call is initiated but before the ajax call returns an answer.

Timeline of your code:

displayContent(page);
$.ajax(etc...); //Ajax call is sent
alert($('#textcontent').text()); // At this point, your #textcontent element is empty
//Sometimes later, the ajax call returns
share|improve this answer

AJAX calls are asynchronous. So while the AJAX request is being sent the rest of the code will execute.

You need to call the function once the AJAX request is complete, as you have done in the first example.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.