Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

for example

  Aclass myAclass = new Aclass();
  for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
  {
     myAclass.load(i);
     myAclass.do();
     myAclass.clear()  // clear the state of myAclass, rdy for next iteration.
  }

or what if I embed the `myAclass.load() into the class constructor, and do sth like:

   for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
   {
      Aclass myAclass = new Aclass(i);
      myAclass.do();
   }

So which way is better practice? btw, the title seems not fitting the content, help me with a more appropriate title.

Note: Constructor of Aclass is trivial, Load() is not, Clear() is trivial (of course the constructor in the 2nd example is not trivial as it triggers Load().)

share|improve this question
1  
Depends on what is do() and what is clear() –  sll Aug 16 '11 at 23:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no way to tell which approach is best in terms of performance, it depends on the implementation of the class.

Now, as a general rule, you should avoid mutable objects, so reusing the same instance of the class to do something else is usually not a good idea. So I would favor the second approach. Of course, if the initialization of the class is an expensive operation, the first approach will be faster...

As for memory usage, the second approach will create more instances in memory, but they will eventually be collected by the GC, so it shouldn't be an issue. The only drawback is that it puts more pressure on the GC, so it could negatively affect performance if there are many iterations.

share|improve this answer
1  
“you should avoid mutable objects”. Immutable objects have some advantages and functional programming is all about them, but I don't think it's a “general rule” for C#. –  svick Aug 17 '11 at 5:30

I'm going to buck the trend, and suggest doing it the second way (assuming trivial construction). The garbage collector thrives on short lived objects, and the second way

  1. is easier to reason about because you're not sharing state between loop iterations by reusing the same object
  2. as a result of the objects' independence is trivially parallelizable (assuming no other hidden shared state)
share|improve this answer

Generally, in C# the Garbage Collector will handle all of that for you.

If you want to expressly dispose of an object when you are done with it, make sure it implements IDisposable and in your loop do the following:

for (int i = 0; i < infinity; i ++)
{
  using (MyClass myObject = new MyClass(i))
  {
    myObject.DoWork();
    ...
  } // The object will dispose here
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks TrueWill for the proof read! (Spell ckecher for the win!) –  EtherDragon Aug 17 '11 at 19:33

For performance it really depends on how much expensive to construct a Aclass class instance vs. calling Clear(), You can test the behavior which is better by running a loop with 10000 iteration for example and use System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch to test which is better performance. So:

  int n = 100000;

  Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

  Aclass myAclass = new Aclass();
  for(int i=0; i<n; i++)
  {
     myAclass.load(i);
     myAclass.do();
     myAclass.clear()  // clear the state of myAclass, rdy for next iteration.
  }
  watch.Stop();
  Console.WriteLine(watch.ElampsedMilliseconds);
  watch.Reset();

  watch.Start();
   for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
   {
      Aclass myAclass = new Aclass(i);
      myAclass.do();
   }
   watch.Stop();

   Console.WriteLine(watch.ElampsedMilliseconds);

Edit: as pair to @Mark comment we should first call the functions without time measurement then run the time test. so:

AClass foo = new AClass();

foo.Load(0);
foo.do();
foo.clear();

then the test code posted above "started by int n = 100000;".

share|improve this answer
1  
You should run this twice and ignore the first results, because the first one will pay JIT penalties and such –  Mark Sowul Aug 17 '11 at 0:01
    
I was hesitate to add that to the answer to not destract the questioner, however but not twice.., only create a foo instance from AClass at the beginning of the test, so AClass foo = new AClass(); then the remaining code.. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Aug 17 '11 at 0:04
    
You'd at least want the other methods to be jitted too; perhaps they load additional assemblies or something. –  Mark Sowul Aug 17 '11 at 0:05
    
Answer updated. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Aug 17 '11 at 0:10

A lot depends on the structure of Aclass.

The first option is usually going to use less memory because you are re-using the class instance. I say usually because if Aclass's state contains a lot of reference types (strings, other classes), then 'clearing' it (setting those references to null) will still leave those objects on the heap for the garbage collector to clean up. It will also likely be slower (and potentially more error prone) because of the time taken to clear the object.

The second way will usually be faster (allocations in .net are really, really fast), but will usually use more memory. This is the common pattern in .net, java, and other garbage collected platforms, because the intention of the garbage collector is to simulate an environment with unlimited memory (See Raymond Chen's article.)

share|improve this answer

In terms of performance, the first option is the best way to go. In the second for loop, every time you iterate through the loop, a new instance of Aclass is going to be instantiated and allocated on the heap. You'll be leaving many instances of this class on the heap that the CLR will have to garbage collect. Garbage collection slows down the execution of the running program since precious CPU cycles must be taken up to free up memory.

Think about it, if your loop iterates 1000 times, it will leave 1000 objects on the heap. Even if each object is 5mb or even 2MB, that will greatly slow down your program. Go with number one. As a side note, I prefer the load method as opposed to the constructor because I find it to be easier to understand what your doing with that class.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.